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Thread: planers

  1. #21
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Maitland, Missouri USA
    Posts
    5

    Default Re: planers

    I have been runnig the Dewalt 13 for a number of years and have recently been planing a lot of rough lumber. I switched to the spiral cutter head $275 I think from eBay and it has made all the difference. I run have hickory, white oak, black walnut, cherry and sycamore thru it and it is still on the first side of the cutters. It gnaws right thru a 12" sycamore no problem

    Kent

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Park City Ky
    Posts
    1,738

    Default Re: planers

    If you are making bee equipment, look for a Delta 22-560 on Craigs list for $100 - $150.00. Cut your rough saw wood to length before planing and it will go a lot faster. I have 3 of these, and I would rate it 9.9 out of 10. Only drawback is an occasional snipe. Keep sharp blades. They are only $29.95 a set.

    cchoganjr

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Clackamas Oregon
    Posts
    693

    Default Re: planers

    Cleo, do you mean width or length? If I get snipe after cutting to length then my joinery does not work out as well.
    “Why do we fall, sir? So that we might learn to pick ourselves up” Alfred Pennyworth Batman Begins (2005)

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Park City Ky
    Posts
    1,738

    Default Re: planers

    Cut both length and width, before planing, unless you are getting excessive snipe. My 3, 22-560 rarely snipe enough to be concerned. A belt sander will take it right out.

    cchoganjr

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,304

    Default Re: planers

    Sniping can largely be controlled/eliminated by simply leveraging the board as you feed it and remove it. The end of the board is getting pulled up into the cutter head so counter this by prying the ends down to the table. Lift the opposite end from the cutter up a tad forcing the other end down.
    Regards, Barry

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Greenville, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,327

    Default Re: planers

    The bees won't notice the snipe at all.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Edgefield, SC
    Posts
    32

    Default Re: planers

    Quote Originally Posted by Barry View Post
    Sniping can largely be controlled/eliminated by simply leveraging the board as you feed it and remove it. The end of the board is getting pulled up into the cutter head so counter this by prying the ends down to the table. Lift the opposite end from the cutter up a tad forcing the other end down.
    Hmmmmm, wonder if adjusting the feed tables to do the same thing would help?

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,304

    Default Re: planers

    I don't follow. The only thing that moves in the process of planing is the board. Everything else is fixed. If anything, I think the rollers may need adjusting, more pressure. My planer doesn't snipe.
    Regards, Barry

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Menomonee Falls, Wis.
    Posts
    2,613

    Default Re: planers

    We have 2 pairs of drive rollers in ours, one pair before, and one pair after the cutter. If I adjust up the lower rollers too far up, the cutter bites differently as the board climbs and falls off the bottom roller. I have found if I set them "proud" of the surface by about 10 "thou", I get minimal cutter digs. Your results may vary.

    Crazy Roland

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Park City Ky
    Posts
    1,738

    Default Re: planers

    Ross... My bees don't notice it either. HA!!!,

    But, I rarely get snipe.

    cchoganjr

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Clackamas Oregon
    Posts
    693

    Default Re: planers

    After I plane I cut to length. I then stack and clamp 6 or 8 sides together to push through the dato on the saw using my finger jig. If I have snipe on the ends the board wants to not fit flat on the saw table or the clamped stack wants to rock. I also built a jig to square and nail the boards. If I sand the ends to make them less noticeable from the snipe the fingers stand proud and show off the mistake unless I sand them again. Since I use two screws to let the glue set (so I can rotate in the jig) I sand off the ends of the coated deck screws. I guess what it comes down to is when I go from building furniture I expect the same craftsmanship from myself. Snipe is 3” of firewood, not a joint face,
    “Why do we fall, sir? So that we might learn to pick ourselves up” Alfred Pennyworth Batman Begins (2005)

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Pueblo, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    650

    Default Re: planers

    Snipe is pretty easy to minimize.
    Zone 5a @ 4700 ft. High Desert
    Facebook

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Clackamas Oregon
    Posts
    693

    Default Re: planers

    So is pregnancy but they both seem to keep happening!
    “Why do we fall, sir? So that we might learn to pick ourselves up” Alfred Pennyworth Batman Begins (2005)

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Pueblo, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    650

    Default Re: planers

    yeah
    Zone 5a @ 4700 ft. High Desert
    Facebook

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    mountainair, torrance, new mexico
    Posts
    23

    Default Re: planers

    Hey everybody thanks for all the talk. I want to go to a portable because I get snipe with my hand power plane, and I don't have much room in my shop. I didn't know about spiral blades either, I thought all planers had straight blades, so I will look into that. I have a Ryobi hand plane and like it except as noted. I use my shop vac, with home made wood adapters on most of my power tools for dust control, but it is not a perfect solution by far, and I will have to see about that. I am looking for a general purpose planer, but thinking a lot about ceder fence boards, because they smell good, they are cheepo, and the wood looks nice when the rough cut is planed down smooth.

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