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Thread: planers

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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    mountainair, torrance, new mexico
    Posts
    23

    Default planers

    I can see how a planer in my wood shop would be a great tool. but they ain't cheep, and there are many brands and sizes. I think 13 inches is about right, as it will handle up to a 12 by. If anyone has tried out the models from sears or hf or hd and can relate your experience and satisfaction level that would be great.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,518

    Default Re: planers

    Sorry, I can't, but if you're able to pick up a used one of these, you won't be sorry. Still have mine from late 1970's. Makita 2040 - 16"

    http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-KRLuDxKEx1...0/CIMG6309.JPG
    Regards, Barry

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Rader, Greene County, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    6,354

    Default Re: planers

    I don't have any past experience with HD, HF or Sears planers.

    I do have a 13" Grizzly floor model planer that I like, but new its about twice the cost of the tabletop planers. But before you make a choice on what to buy, make sure you investigate replacement blades and their costs. Some planers use 'disposable' blades which aren't meant to be sharpened. That is OK if that is what you want, but explore those choices/costs before you buy.
    Graham
    --- Practical reality trumps philosophy!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Gallatin, Montana, USA
    Posts
    80

    Default Re: planers

    I wore out a Dewalt 12 1/2". It planed a lot of boards. I replaced it with a delta 15" floor model. I bought it from an online auction site called MachineryMax. It was brand new in the box. It retailed for about $1200. I paid $575 including shipping. Check out their site they have some pretty amazing deals.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    New London WI, USA
    Posts
    87

    Default Re: planers

    Have you checked craigslist? Sometimes you can find a good used floor model cheaper than a new bench-top because not many people "need" a 18 or a 20" planer so they don't sell fast

    I have a Delta 12.5" and it works fine as long as it has sharp knives. And there's the problem. Fleet Farm here is WI sells the planer but not replacement knives.

    I also purchased a used Woodmaster 718 for $450. Knives are $80 a set

    I like the Woodmaster for larger jobs like a pile of rough cut lumber.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Menomonee Falls, Wis.
    Posts
    2,729

    Default Re: planers

    We picked up a 12" Powermatic planer, made when Ike was president, cast iron, 300 lbs, 3 hp , 3 phase. Don't send a boy to do a man's job. It was pricey(less than 1K), but well worth it if you need to make alot of 3/8th" material for innercovers and roofs.

    Crazy Roland

  7. #7

    Default Re: planers

    The better Dewalt one is good.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Victoria, BC, Canada
    Posts
    43

    Default Re: planers

    I've had a Delta portable planer almost identical to this one, for somewhere between 10 & 15 years, and it's still going strong. It was on sale for just over $200 at the time. I'm a hobbiest, but have run a ton of wood thru this machine over the years. As others have reported, a 1/16th of an inch is about as much as it wants to take in one pass, depending on the wood species -- maybe a bit more with soft woods like pine and cedar. I do a lot of wood segmenting and run it thru with no problem. Lot of furniture with shelves made of strips of wood glued together -- again, no problem. It came with a spare set of blades (that are a bugger to re & re...), but it provides an extremely smooth surface requiring only a light sanding before finish. The cuts are accurate with opposite sides perfectly parallel.

    It's greatest issue -- not mentioned here yet -- is snipe. Even with carefully aligned rollers to bear the weight of the wood passing thru, it still takes a pretty good bite from the end of the piece. I've largely overcome that with sacrificial follower boards, that take the snipe cuts as they pass thru behind. With smaller boards, I've used a hot glue gun to to quickly glue longer sacrificial pieces to the work, and knock them off with a hammer when done. It's a PIA, doing this...

    More expensive higher quality planers don't have snipe issues.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    lafargeville ny usa
    Posts
    805

    Default Re: planers

    the dewalt portable has heavier blades than the rest. I am told that the rigid portable is also good and has the best warranty. I have had a dewalt for years, the heavier knives make a difference I think.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    S Hadley, Massachusetts USA
    Posts
    690

    Default Re: planers

    I picked up the Ridgid 13" bench top planer. I give it a 7 out of 10. It works decent. The blades are very sharp but rather thin. They dull very quickly and are reversible. The reason I don't give it a 10 is the snipe factor is next to impossible to over come. The in and out feed tables are perfectly level and ends of the boards get sniped. I now run 14' thru at a time any just cut off the last 3".
    Pearl City Apiary Michael and Loucil Bach

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Menomonee Falls, Wis.
    Posts
    2,729

    Default Re: planers

    Vance wrote:

    That three phase sucker has to make the electric meter spin!

    I use an inverter, which seems to help. I will try to check it. Never noticed it that much on the bill, but it you get done in a few days what might take a week with smaller unit.

    Crazy Roland

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Oxford, Maine
    Posts
    182

    Default Re: planers

    If you are only planing boards 10" or less and not tens of thousands lineal feet of lumber than the smaller planers would probably
    do anyone just fine. Portable is nice if you don't have much shop space. You can get it out of the way when you don't need it.
    I had about 400 lin ft. of 1x14 to 1x16" rough pine boards hanging around forever and finally got an order for a wide pine stereo cabinet so trucked it to the mill to get planed to the tune of $110.00.
    Snipe can be a problem at times so got use to planing before trimming to desired length when possible.
    Last edited by woodsy; 03-08-2014 at 09:50 AM.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    lafargeville ny usa
    Posts
    805

    Default Re: planers

    a 3 phase motor is always more efficient than a similar single phase motor. the problem is that most non industrial areas only have single phase available. in my area 3 phase is commercial rate which is 3 times residential rate, I am lucky 3 phase is not available here...... there are 3 basic ways to change single phase into 3 phase to run a 3phase motor.....the cheapest way is a capacitor box type, this will only give you 2/3 of the motors rated output. the motor and converter will overheat above this. this takes more power than true 3 phase, but it is cheap, best suited where the motor is only under light load without much of a start load...... a solid state inverter is a lot more money, it must be over sized with single phase input, a 10hp 3 phase motor would require a 15 hp or 20 hp inverter depending on application, this is the clear choice for variable speed applications. a solid state inverter should only be used with a motor that is rated "inverter rated", this means better windings in the motor, these solid state units are high tech, they cannot stand lighting and power surges...... for single speed heavy loads [planer] the best choice is a rotary inverter. it should be sized as close as possible to the load without being undersized, about 1 1/2 times size or less. the rotaries are dependable and low maintainence.......a few years back a local machine shop way back in the woods built there own rotary that was a bit different, it used so little electricity that the power co. investigated, changed meters and sent out spies. the power co. then sent up engineers from over a hundred miles away to try and figure out why it worked so well.
    Last edited by mathesonequip; 03-08-2014 at 09:43 AM.

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