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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Upper Kingsclear, NB, Canada
    Posts
    74

    Default Varroa survival in dead-outs

    Many sources of information on the varroa life cycle are surprisingly vague about this, but it seems that varroa do not perist in egg form outside a living colony. In other words, for them to carry on year over year in the same colony, it has to have live bees/brood in it to sustain some adult varroa. Therefore, if the colony dies entirely, all the adult varroa presumably die...my concern was that re-used comb might contain varroa eggs that could infect other bees. Not possible? Of course there may be varroa-transmitted viruses and a whole constellation of other stuff on those combs, some desirable , some not. But as far as varroa is concerned, there should be no carry-over from dead-out equipment??

    thanks,

    Rob

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Montgomery County, NY
    Posts
    1,690

    Default Re: Varroa survival in dead-outs

    That is correct. check out http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/doc...d=2744&page=14

    You will notice the female varroa destructor doesn't start to lay eggs until after she has already started engorging herself on prepupa blood after day nine. Day nine and day 10 is when workers/drones sping their cocoon. Day 11 is when first varroa egg is laid. That stated logic only shows the cells in which the eggs are laid are already capped thus trapping the mites in the cocoon until the bee emerges. Because the mites are trapped in the cell with the larva by the cocoon then all eggs will be hatched by the time the bee emerges. Therefore you will have no worries about unhatched varroa eggs in deadouts.

    Be more concerned about Fb or Nosema twins.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,797

    Default Re: Varroa survival in dead-outs

    >my concern was that re-used comb might contain varroa eggs that could infect other bees. Not possible?

    Not possible.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Posts
    1,255

    Default Re: Varroa survival in dead-outs

    If you get a bee package and no comb or brood is that a good time to vapourizer or use some sort of varroa treatment. Try to start clean or are package so stressed at that time that treatments will kill them..including kill the Queen?
    Janne....first hives April 2013, 19 hives, treat, plant zone 8b, at sea level, latitude 49.13, longitude 123.06

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Lottsburg, Virginia USA
    Posts
    131

    Default Re: Varroa survival in dead-outs

    There was a paper put out by some university where tests were conducted with very good results on the spraying of packages with a OA and sugar solution. I would think that OA vapour would give better results with less stress on the package. If I had known this at the time I got my first packages I would have OA treated them before hiving and saved myself a lot of trouble as I am sure the mite population in my yards was imported with the bees.
    Johno

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