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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Largo,Florida
    Posts
    69

    Default Hive on the beach in a dead palm

    I work for a city on the gulf coast. While removing and cleaning out a bum nest in one of our beach sand dunes I came across a bee hive that is in a fallen palm. The palm is laying on the ground and only elevated the last 4 feet with the hive entrance on the bottom end of the dead palm.The palm is about 12 to 18 inches in diameter. I can only drive within 30 yards of the hive due to beach restrictions so a vacuum is probably out. It would be nice for the free bees(sort of), but is it even worth trying. Also how would someone even start. I'm just wondering if anyone else has run into this problem?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    26,761

    Default Re: Hive on the beach in a dead palm

    What is a bum nest?
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Rader, Greene County, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    5,956

    Default Re: Hive on the beach in a dead palm

    Squatter's camp, hobo jungle, homeless encampment ....
    Graham
    USDA Zone 7A Elevation 1400 ft

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Ft Myers, Fl 33967
    Posts
    161

    Default Re: Hive on the beach in a dead palm

    Been there, done that. Was not worth the effort.
    Hauled a generator in and ran 150 ft of extension cord to the nest. MY tree had not allen down but was dead. Cut it in sections with a chain saw and ruined a chain. Had to split the cores and that was a mess. Honey, wax, brood and sawdust everywhere. No honey to speak of and a small nest on top of that. Bees were testy and hard to vacuum. They absconded two days later.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Largo,Florida
    Posts
    69

    Default Re: Hive on the beach in a dead palm

    Yeah, I'm kind of leaning to the side of not worth the hassle. And the reason you ruined your chain is because a palm is fibrous and full of wind blown sand. As it grows on the beach the sand gets caught in the trunk and becomes part of the tree. So when you use a chainsaw on it the sand dulls it quickly. I'll go through two chains if it's a big palm. Thanks for giving me a heads up on the hassle factor.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    26,761

    Default Re: Hive on the beach in a dead palm

    When in doubt, do without.
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

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