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Thread: cutout

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Pendleton,Oregon USA
    Posts
    22

    Default cutout

    I have been offered a hive of bees that are living in the wall of a chicken coop, they are believed to have moved in last summer. Any guesses as to how big this thing could be, it is supposed to be pushing out onthe walls.I don't even have bees yet, I am really green about all of this have,watched a lot of videos about how to go about it.How late in to the season should I wait? We are just now getting a few 50's. They can't get anybody interested in getting these out. I don't have to do any repair when I'm done. free bees just seam to good to pass up!How many deeps should I take over?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Kinder, Louisiana, USA
    Posts
    155

    Default Re: cutout

    Go for it ! Doubt it's pushing on the walls, bees aren't that strong and comb doesn't swell.
    Don't wait too long. I'd start as soon as soon as temp hits 60. The earlier you get them moved, the earlier they can get back to work building up for next winter.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Bloomfield,KY
    Posts
    277

    Default Re: cutout

    If they really want them out and no one else will bother, I'd charge at least $50 to at least cover some of your hive costs ( I do this professionally and charge much more than that ). I prefer to wait until temp's are staying in the high 50's before doing removals Taking the bees out isn't really that hard but it does take basic carpentry skills to get them out without making the repair harder for the next guy or causing more cost for the homeowner. It's hard to say how large it will be without knowing when they moved in. If they moved in during the early nectar flow, they can build quite a bit of comb. At this time of year you may not see a large amount of sealed brood or open brood, open brood will chill quickly. If they haven't been raising a lot of brood, then there will more than likely be a lot of honey in the combs, provided they had time to build up enough stores to winter on properly. I would take at least 2 deep bodies and 10 frames, it's good to bring a queen clip also.. A bee vac is "worth it's weight in gold" when doing cutouts but I have also used a brush. Start cutting comb from the outside combs and work your way in, checking each comb for the queen as you go. I would expect the bees to be a bit more defensive at this time of year. The best way to learn how to do cutouts is by doing them just be aware of which way smoke will drive the bees if using it.Remember, the less smoke the better! I can usually get by with a puff at the entrance when starting work but sometimes the bees decide differently! Always be on the lookout for the queen, catching her makes the job much easier. Good Luck.
    "Of all God's creatures, only the honeybee improves its environment and preys on no other species."--Haydon Brown

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Rockford, MI
    Posts
    2,519

    Default Re: cutout

    Wait until the lows are above 45 consistantly. Most of my first year coutouts will fit into two mediums. Bring two deeps.
    Best advice I can give is TAKE YOUR TIME, find the queen and carefully cage her. Also be relaxed while performing the cutout.
    Until the weather cooperates, watch some more cutout vids. Be prepared.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Reno, NV
    Posts
    2,919

    Default Re: cutout

    I don't do cut outs for free anymore. it will leave you broke paying to solve other peoples problems at $100 a pop pretty fast. Not many will pay to get rid of them. I tell them to keep my number. I do home repair as well.
    Stand for what you believe, even if you stand alone.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Pleasant Shade, TN
    Posts
    443

    Default Re: cutout

    What Daniel Y said is definitely true. However, I still offer doing cut outs for free. But I am very very picky about which cut outs I do. I consider the space that the bees are in, how difficult will it be to open the space, is it an outbuilding or living space, etc. This helps me determine whether I want to do the project or not. Also, like Daniel said, you will get calls about bees in walls, and then find that people are not interested in paying for having them removed, in which case I decide not to do the cut out, but I instead use the hive as a source for feral bees. If they don't want to pay,then they don't want the service bad enough. The location then becomes a place for one of my swarm traps. A lot less work is involved with about the same chance of getting viable bees. It's a win win for everyone.
    In your situation though, since it is a chicken house and not someone's $500,000 home, I would give it a go. You need the experience to help you in different situations in the future. Like everyone else said,wait til the weather warms up a bit more. Have fun with it and learn. Good luck.
    A man is worth just as much as the things about which he busies himself- Marcus Aurelius

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Pendleton,Oregon USA
    Posts
    22

    Default Re: cutout

    everybody thanks for your input,I plan to wait 3-4 more weeks depending on our weather. if this was something besides a coop I probably would pass.

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