Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 37 of 37

Thread: In the NORTH

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    SNOW SHOE PA USA
    Posts
    1,241

    Default Re: In the NORTH

    Quote Originally Posted by Honey-4-All View Post
    Did she also happen to purchase a vacation home in some appropriate Malaria infested tropical climate where you could use it?

    Not in ol Penns state but the biggest advantage I can see in this design is that the skunks will have a bit of a difficult time banging on the front door. Might also be the case that the raccoons could rip out the top bars as a disadvantage.
    I have fence we have bear.
    Say hello to the bad guy!
    year five==== 31 hives==== T{OAV}

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    27,092

    Default Re: In the NORTH

    Are those bars the right width? They look about twice the width of regular top bars. Unless the perspective isn't there.
    Mark Berninghausen #youmatter

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    SNOW SHOE PA USA
    Posts
    1,241

    Default Re: In the NORTH

    Quote Originally Posted by sqkcrk View Post
    Are those bars the right width? They look about twice the width of regular top bars. Unless the perspective isn't there.
    They are 1 3/8 and on the other side I have half rounds to put wax on for them to start on.
    Say hello to the bad guy!
    year five==== 31 hives==== T{OAV}

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Athens, OH
    Posts
    2,695

    Default Re: In the NORTH

    My TBH is going into it's 5th year here in Ohio. They do fine here, but never made much surplus honey. It was a nice learning tool but I'm tired of it. Langs much more versatile.
    Politics is the entertainment branch of industry. -Frank Zappa

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Gallatin, Montana, USA
    Posts
    80

    Default Re: In the NORTH

    Quote Originally Posted by GLOCK View Post
    They are 1 3/8 and on the other side I have half rounds to put wax on for them to start on.
    1 3/8 is alittle wide in the brood area. they should be 1 1/4. 1 3/8 is good for honey. I haven't seen anyone use a rounded starter. Doesn't mean it won't work. I use a pointed starter and have never had cross or crooked comb. You are really going to enjoy the ride. Nothing like a TBH to get to see what bees are really capable of. You really need to carve out enough time to go through them every week.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,131

    Default Re: In the NORTH

    The more of an edge you have, the better it works as a starter. I do not wax my starters and I recommend you do not wax them. Your wax will not stick as well as the bees will attach it themselves and can lead to combs that fall off the bars sometimes, and wax that falls off of the starters sometimes... they follow them just as well without the wax.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    SNOW SHOE PA USA
    Posts
    1,241

    Default Re: In the NORTH

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Bush View Post
    The more of an edge you have, the better it works as a starter. I do not wax my starters and I recommend you do not wax them. Your wax will not stick as well as the bees will attach it themselves and can lead to combs that fall off the bars sometimes, and wax that falls off of the starters sometimes... they follow them just as well without the wax.
    thank you.
    What do you think about my bars?
    Say hello to the bad guy!
    year five==== 31 hives==== T{OAV}

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,131

    Default Re: In the NORTH

    >What do you think about my bars?

    Sorry, I'm afraid all the pictures are blocked for me, so I can't see them.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Bristol,RI
    Posts
    385

    Default Re: In the NORTH

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Bush View Post
    >What do you think about my bars?

    Sorry, I'm afraid all the pictures are blocked for me, so I can't see them.
    they look like .75-1" dowels cut in half. should work fine i'd think. sorta wedge style

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,131

    Default Re: In the NORTH

    The old Greek basket hives had a curve to them and not an edge, but I think an edge works better at keeping them in a precise location on the bar.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Greater Hartford area, CT
    Posts
    269

    Default Re: In the NORTH

    Quote Originally Posted by GLOCK View Post
    Is there any PA. TBH keepers in the house and if so is it hard to do the TBH thing here in N.PA?
    My wife built me a TBH and I'm going to give it a shoot this spring so what is the pros and cons?.
    First of all, your wife is totally awesome! What a thoughtful and amazing gift!

    I started last year with a TBH in New England. Unfortunately, a bear got my hive in the fall, but they seemed to be doing really well up until that point.

    I think most of the cons I've seen have to do with weather. Can bees survive the cold living horizontally? Sam Comfort (upstate NY), Michael Bush (NE), and Christy Hemenway (ME) are well-known beekeepers with TBHs, and they seem to manage. I also follow the blog of a Swedish TBH guy who has no trouble keeping his girls alive. So the answer is yes, and I don't think the climate in PA should be a deciding factor for you.

    However, there are other real cons, though, including lack of standardized equipment, it's more difficult to feed emergency rations in the winter, they require more maintenance, and there is less overall support for TBH beekeepers.

    On the plus side, though, I love the fact that the bees are waist-high and the bars are light. My back thanks me for that. Skunks and other creatures have a harder time getting into the hive because it's off the ground. Because this is a hobby, not a business for me, I actually look forward to doing frequent maintenance. I really get into watching the bees do their thing. My neighbors like seeing the hive, too.

    In any case, your wife has given you such an amazing gift, and I hope you really enjoy it!

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Baker Oregon
    Posts
    2,373

    Default Re: In the NORTH

    Quote Originally Posted by Dominic View Post
    Are you sure starvation was the cause, if they had honey within reach...?
    Quite sure, however they were weak due to mites. So you could say the extended cold snap (6 weeks and never got above freezing) we had and the starvation were symptoms and the mites were the cause. Or the other way around. In the end they starved inches (or less) from honey, because they could not move to that honey.

    Nor am I claiming that the TBH survived the winter better due to the fact it was a TBH. All the colonies were treated the same, TX free, and some of the lang colonies were from the same source as the TBH. I am stating that this was my experiance. My personal preferance is using langs however the TBH is fun, and I will keep it around, and perhaps build another one.
    Last edited by RiodeLobo; 02-14-2014 at 03:38 PM.
    Dan Hayden 4 Years. 9 hives. Tx Free. USDA Zone 5b.

  13. #33
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Accomac, Virginia
    Posts
    190

    Default Re: In the NORTH

    Is there any PA. TBH keepers in the house and if so is it hard to do the TBH thing here in N.PA?

    Just South of you, we keep TBHs and several Langs.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Ed

  14. #34
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Roanoke, VA
    Posts
    1,495

    Default Re: In the NORTH

    Glock, nice bear fence! Got any details on that?

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Canada BC Delta
    Posts
    426

    Default Re: In the NORTH

    Healthy bees and a well packed winter nest is quite important in colder areas. Any where that single deeps are wintered TBH's should winter. I think your best advice would be from the ones practicing wintering in this fashion. This outfit winters in singles located in Cut Knife Saskatchewan and may have some useful info on the web pages.

    http://www.pedersenapiaries.ca/revisited.html

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    SNOW SHOE PA USA
    Posts
    1,241

    Default Re: In the NORTH

    Quote Originally Posted by shannonswyatt View Post
    Glock, nice bear fence! Got any details on that?
    I have 6 ft. 14 gauge black coated fence on 4x4s with 3 rows of barb wire through ceramic insulators hooked up to a Zareba SP10B Low Impedance Solar Electric Fence Controller. Works great never had a problem with any thing .
    Say hello to the bad guy!
    year five==== 31 hives==== T{OAV}

  17. #37
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Montgomery Twp, PA
    Posts
    160

    Default Re: In the NORTH

    I'm in SE PA, about 40 minutes north of Philly. I have 1 top bar hive. It is my first hive, and I've only had it for a year. Started it with a package from Georgia and they requeened 3-4 times last year. My hive is currently PACKED and the bees are doing awesome. They seem to be tolerating varroa and they have done amazingly well with the cold this year. I know there is varroa in the hive from the mess of melted fondant on the floor that I've cleaned from time to time. I've done minimal treatments. I think I'm going to have to split the hive this spring. On warmer days (over 40degrees farenheight), all 20 bars are completely covered in bees.

    I'll be adding a lang this year with a package of bees from Sam Comfort. The top bar is all I know and it has been great! If you are going to do it, make sure you have a hive with a window. You can easily add one now if your wife didn't add one.

    Just to touch on some of the comments made previously..... feeding is more difficult than a lang. I built a feeder. It's a trapezoid shape with hardware cloth across the front. As long as the temp is above freezing, the bees will move all over the hive to get food. I started my winter with a split cluster. The bees readjusted before the many snow storms hit. They constantly break cluster to go to the feeder on warm days. Really, the best part of the TBH is the window. I peek on my bees all the time... something you can't do with a lang. It has been a great learning tool for my first year. I have seen them dragging wax moths/larva and drones during eviction across the window. It's amazing!

    Treating the bees is also more difficult with a TBH, that is if you are going to treat.

    I have some shakey, but good videos on my youtube.

    http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCHuO8_ZT3z_QXFi2gf30PGg
    Last edited by chr157y; 02-25-2014 at 11:10 AM.
    Christy
    Beekeeping, working mom of 2 little future beekeepers in Pennsylvania.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads