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  1. #21
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    Jan 2003
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    Manitoba Canada
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    Default Re: Time to get nervous #3

    I keep touch with my Cali supplier, to which I hinge my operation on...
    here is a snip from our last conversation in regards to the challenges of current extended drought conditions;

    "... It will be a challenge for sure this year but this is not the first time. We put a lot of inputs into our bees and never let them stress, our annual loss each year runs around 5 to 8 percent, those losses are figured between September 1st and Feb 1st and we run thousands of hives. We cannot afford to have any high losses because so many people are depending on us to produce queens and package bees on a consistent basis year after year, we operate at a very highly (intensive) labor level... "

    Professional beekeepers taking this situation very seriously, and doing everything they can to MANAGE the situation.
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Milwaukee, Wisconsin
    Posts
    106

    Default Re: Time to get nervous #3

    And how long do you get out of your queens before you have to requeen them?

  3. #23
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    Default Re: Time to get nervous #3

    I requeen 50% every year.
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  4. #24
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    Jan 2003
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    Manitoba Canada
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    Default Re: Time to get nervous #3

    Nosema, viral loads, chemical contaminated wax they live months and months and years on. Im finding regardless the queens that come in, or are raised here on the farm they all fall to the same fate, too early. Requeening is just becoming a part of a good management strategy. If we cant manage the conditions affect our queen health, then we must manage the issue the only way we can.
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Milwaukee, Wisconsin
    Posts
    106

    Default Re: Time to get nervous #3

    Quote Originally Posted by Ian View Post
    I requeen 50% every year.
    You're an honest beekeeper...I'll give you that much. Having to replace half the queens every year isn't good... I see it in the u.s with people I know... If you want to keep them alive all winter, you have to. You don't see a problem with having to replace half every year? I bet the queens lay like crazy then run out of eggs.

  6. #26
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    Jan 2003
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    Default Re: Time to get nervous #3

    Quote Originally Posted by grumpybeeman View Post
    You don't see a problem with having to replace half every year?
    yes I do.

    what exactly are you figuring your going to do about this issue? If it were as simple as breeding, then it would represent a non issue. The problem is a more than just one contributing condition
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Milwaukee, Wisconsin
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    106

    Default Re: Time to get nervous #3

    Quote Originally Posted by Ian View Post
    yes I do.

    what exactly are you figuring your going to do about this issue? If it were as simple as breeding, then it would represent a non issue. The problem is a more than just one contributing condition
    How many head of cattle do you run? Would you sell your best bull or heifers and keep the lame one or sick one that occasionally comes along? They're selling the tired-bad genetic bees to everybody all over the u.s. and it sounds like canada as well. If someone sold you a cow that was supposed to be calving, sent her up in a freight car and said here you go...And she wasn't. That wouldn't be very nice...would it? That's what we're getting with bees....

    These crap genetic queen bees that don't last a year started somewhere. They're bred to lay alot. Queen breeders are doing the same thing that manufacturers are with products.. They make it/breed it as cheap as they can and sell as much of it as they can for as much$ as they can. It's a throw away society, and it's not an accident.
    Last edited by JohnK and Sheri; 02-01-2014 at 06:25 PM. Reason: off topic

  8. #28
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    Jan 2003
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    Default Re: Time to get nervous #3

    Its obvious you have no idea what your talking about.

    Have you ever spoken to a large commercial queen breeder? Local breeder? Extremely professional. They would talk you under the table about their breeding efforts.

    Have you ever considered breeding your own queens? Because in your eye, that should solve all your problems.
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  9. #29
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    Jan 2014
    Location
    Milwaukee, Wisconsin
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    106

    Default Re: Time to get nervous #3

    Quote Originally Posted by Ian View Post
    Its obvious you have no idea what your talking about.

    Have you ever spoken to a large commercial queen breeder? Local breeder? Extremely professional. They would talk you under the table about their breeding efforts.

    Have you ever considered breeding your own queens? Because in your eye, that should solve all your problems.
    Take bees that burn out early and breed stock off of that...That makes sense, doesn't it? Are you kidding me?
    Last edited by JohnK and Sheri; 02-01-2014 at 06:26 PM. Reason: off topic

  10. #30
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    Jan 2003
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    Manitoba Canada
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    Default Re: Is almond pollination adversely affecting queen genetics?

    Quote Originally Posted by grumpybeeman View Post
    Take bees that burn out early and breed stock off of that...That makes sense, doesn't it?
    Sounds like you will have this problem well at hand throughout your own breeding efforts.
    Last edited by JohnK and Sheri; 02-01-2014 at 06:29 PM.

  11. #31
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    Jan 2014
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    Milwaukee, Wisconsin
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    Default Re: Is almond pollination adversely affecting queen genetics?

    "Sounds like you will have this problem well at hand throughout your own breeding efforts"

    More like trying to find bees that aren't bred for pollination. I don't move them around to florida, georgia, etc.
    Last edited by JohnK and Sheri; 02-01-2014 at 06:27 PM. Reason: off topic

  12. #32
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    Dec 2005
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    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
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    Default Re: Time to get nervous #3

    Quote Originally Posted by grumpybeeman View Post
    I bet the queens lay like crazy then run out of eggs.
    What is this queens laying like crazy and then running out that you are talking about? What does that look like?

    I don't know where you are getting your crappy queens from, but you should shop around more.
    Mark Berninghausen
    Squeak Creek Apiaries



  13. #33
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Spokane, Washington, USA
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    768

    Default Re: Time to get nervous #3

    Quote Originally Posted by grumpybeeman View Post
    I bet the queens lay like crazy then run out of eggs.
    I would have to disagree with the statement. If a queen runs out of eggs then she turns into a drone layer. If you bought some queens and they are laying drones then most likely they failed at mating. Most of the time queens that are laying crazy and are about to run out of eggs get superseded. Do you think bees forgot what supercedure is?

  14. #34
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    Jan 2014
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    Milwaukee, Wisconsin
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    Default Re: Time to get nervous #3

    Quote Originally Posted by RAK View Post
    I would have to disagree with the statement. If a queen runs out of eggs then she turns into a drone layer. If you bought some queens and they are laying drones then most likely they failed at mating. Most of the time queens that are laying crazy and are about to run out of eggs get superseded. Do you think bees forgot what supercedure is?
    Cordovans for example...Their output is too high...

  15. #35
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    Jun 2012
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    Suffolk, NY, USA
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    648

    Default Re: Is almond pollination adversely affecting queen genetics?

    Quote Originally Posted by grumpybeeman View Post
    "Sounds like you will have this problem well at hand throughout your own breeding efforts"

    More like trying to find bees that aren't bred for pollination. I don't move them around to florida, georgia, etc.
    there are beekeepers that currently post on BeeSource that breed bees in the northern states for honey production. Go back and search for and look at some older posts to find them. Maybe they have the stock you can start your breeding program with.
    As for the rest of your belly aching .

  16. #36
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    Default Re: Is almond pollination adversely affecting queen genetics?

    Quote Originally Posted by grumpybeeman View Post
    Cordovans for example...Their output is too high...
    What would your target output be, exactly... Because what Cali is giving me is exactly the out put I'm looking for. Longevity is a totally different set if circumstances

  17. #37
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    Dec 2005
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    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
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    Default Re: Time to get nervous #3

    Quote Originally Posted by grumpybeeman View Post
    Their output is too high...
    Does that mean that the queen lays more eggs than the nurse bees can tend to? Or that the queen lays more eggs than workers can keep covered when cold conditions exist.
    Mark Berninghausen
    Squeak Creek Apiaries



  18. #38
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    Default Re: Time to get nervous #3

    I think one thing that might help this conversation is if Grumpybeeman edit his name to happybeeman and his posts might reflect a more constructive tone
    Because in our email conversations you emit a more positive attitude

  19. #39
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Milwaukee, Wisconsin
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    106

    Default Re: Time to get nervous #3

    Quote Originally Posted by Ian View Post
    I think one thing that might help this conversation is if Grumpybeeman edit his name to happybeeman and his posts might reflect a more constructive tone
    Because in our email conversations you emit a more positive attitude
    That's because I'm not busting knuckles trying to put chains back on sprockets that want to throw them off. What kind of queens are they that are crapping out on you?.... Cordovan seem to be here and gone in no time.

  20. #40
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    New York City, NY
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    4,317

    Default Re: Time to get nervous #3

    He's got something to gripe about.

    The average queen lasts only six months, and there are only 500-700 breeder queens in the U.S. .

    When you consider the large number of queens required each year for almond pollination alone, it becomes an issue.

    Of course, beekeepers don't have a magic wand and can't simply make new/better breeder queens appear out of thin air.

    My question would be, 'Where are you going to get new breeder queens to replace/augment the current ones?'

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