Results 1 to 20 of 20
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Centerville, Utah, USA
    Posts
    272

    Default New to all of this

    Hello everyone I have never kept bees before, and am intent on fully educating myself before I begin. I know without a doubt that natural and organic is the way to go for me, but I am having a bit of a hard time finding resources as readily available on the subject. I ordered the Organic Beekeeping 101 DVD, and there are a couple books I have in queue at the library, but I wondered if there were any good books, how to's, or websites that you experts recommend to get me started.

    Thanks so much!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,385

    Default Re: New to all of this

    Hi Teal -

    Start by reading the basic books on beekeeping. The Hive and the Honey Bee, First Lessons In Beekeeping, BEEKEEPING IN THE UNITED STATES, and then supplement it with more natural beekeeping oriented books like The Complete Idiot's Guide to Beekeeping, The Practical Beekeeper. You'll get real time support right here in this forum.

    Enjoy!
    Regards, Barry

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Walker, Alabama, USA
    Posts
    884

    Default Re: New to all of this

    For websites, try bushfarms.com--Michael Bush's site, which is geared for treatment-free beekeeping.

    HTH

    Rusty
    Rusty Hills Farm -- home of AQHA A Rusty Zipper & Rusty's Bees ( LC and T)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,385

    Default Re: New to all of this

    Another good site: http://talkingstick.me/bees/
    Regards, Barry

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Centerville, Utah, USA
    Posts
    272

    Default Re: New to all of this

    Awesome, you guys, thank you so much! I feel that I have somewhere to start now

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
    Posts
    5,071

    Default Re: New to all of this

    I second Complete Idiot's Guide and bushfarms.com.

    You might check out my website as well. I don't have vast encyclopedic content like Michael Bush does, my focus is intense practicality.
    Solomon Parker, Parker Farms, ParkerFarms.biz
    11 Years Treatment-Free, ~25 Colony Baseline

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Centerville, Utah, USA
    Posts
    272

    Default Re: New to all of this

    Most of these books I have had to place on a new book order from my library, but that makes me happy, because then these practices will be more available to others interested in my area I have been reading the websites all day too, so thanks for those links.

    Are there any other forums on this site that I should be frequenting other than this one? There are so many topics but many seem geared toward conventional/commercial beekeeping.

    Also, what are you experts thoughts on Hex Hives? I know next to nothing, but I really liked the look of those hives, plus the super cool copper roof! Seems smart to me too, but again, I am a true novice here.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
    Posts
    5,071

    Default Re: New to all of this

    Quote Originally Posted by HoneyTeal View Post
    Also, what are you experts thoughts on Hex Hives? I know next to nothing, but I really liked the look of those hives, plus the super cool copper roof! Seems smart to me too, but again, I am a true novice here.
    The difficulty with hives that are out of the ordinary is that they work differently than the ordinary. The ordinary is there for a reason, it works, and it works better at what it does than other things or else they'd have the job. The same thing goes for those big horizontal axis three-bladed wind turbines. If something worked better for the job, somebody would be using it.

    However, your purposes may adapt themselves better to a different tool.

    But don't let me sound like I'm encouraging you to do something like that. Looks do not a beehive make. You want something that works. If you want to make some honey, I might be able to recommend a topbar hive. If you want to make a lot of honey and a lot of bees, use what everyone else is using. It works better. Other styles of hives are going to be more work or less work and from what I have read about care of hex hives, they don't really involve any beekeeping at all, just bee having.

    Yes, they look kinda cool. But I have a copper roofed hive too. And they're expensive. I got mine for free when a newbee's hive failed and they gave up and gave all their stuff to me. I don't want to see that happen to you. I don't want any more free copper hive tops. I mean, I'll take 'em, but y'know, I have seen enough newbees quit.
    Solomon Parker, Parker Farms, ParkerFarms.biz
    11 Years Treatment-Free, ~25 Colony Baseline

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Centerville, Utah, USA
    Posts
    272

    Default Re: New to all of this

    I totally get where you're coming from. I would much rather have the sound advice of an expert to keep me grounded and on track than spend my money or time with something that has a higher chance of not working for me

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,821

    Default Re: New to all of this

    >Also, what are you experts thoughts on Hex Hives? I know next to nothing, but I really liked the look of those hives, plus the super cool copper roof! Seems smart to me too, but again, I am a true novice here.

    The big disadvantage to the hex hive is that you have various sized combs which makes them not interchangable. Interchangable combs make your life and your choices much easier. It's also helpful to have standard things as you have things available if you need them, like escape boards, or queen excluders. Not that I run excluders all the time, but they are handy to have around for some manipulations such as shaking the bees off the brood combs and putting those above the exluder to insure you don't get the queen.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Milwaukee, Wisconsin
    Posts
    106

    Default Re: New to all of this

    Whatever happened to taking a basic wood working class, and then buying a table saw??? That should be the first fundamental of beekeeping. Unless of course you already have a friend with a table saw, or own one for that matter. You can spend 200 bucks in the blink of an eye buying wooden ware or spend 100 bucks for a good used saw. Scrap wood from job/construction sites is a good starting point past having access to a saw.

    -Hammer, nails, and a ruler.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Walker, Alabama, USA
    Posts
    884

    Default Re: New to all of this

    Quote Originally Posted by grumpybeeman View Post
    Whatever happened to taking a basic wood working class, and then buying a table saw??? That should be the first fundamental of beekeeping.
    Let's not make this any more complicated than it really needs to be. A hobbyist doesn't need a table saw to build hives. I've always built my own hives (20+ years and counting) and use hand tools. Table saws scare the you-know-what out of me. If you are patient and take your time, you don't need to invest all that cash unless and until you know this hobby really IS for you. Raise some bees first and decide if you enjoy that. THEN you can take the courses and buy that table if you still want to.

    JMO

    Rusty
    Rusty Hills Farm -- home of AQHA A Rusty Zipper & Rusty's Bees ( LC and T)

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Milwaukee, Wisconsin
    Posts
    106

    Default Re: New to all of this

    The young lady could always take the easy way out and find a local beekeeper in her area to loan her some boxes to get her started. The beesuit bought is always a plus for those days that mosquitoes are out in the garden, or after you when you're fishing. Rotted out corners on deeps and supers may not mean much to most people, but with a quick wrap around of rabbit wire(hardware cloth)...that old box stack is mouse proof. If you can find someone to loan you boxes and not charge you for it, tipping with honey and a thank you plate of something good is always warmly welcomed by the beekeeper helping you out. Find an old retired/only a few hives for personal use beekeeper that will give you a good ear full. That's the best way hands down to learn. Each area in the country has different rules, just like gardening & the weather.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Mifflin PA USA
    Posts
    66

    Default Re: New to all of this

    Natural Beekeeping by Ross Conrad is the one that convinced me beyond all doubt that I wanted treatment free.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Centerville, Utah, USA
    Posts
    272

    Default Re: New to all of this

    I'm really happy to be getting so much feedback. Even more happy to learn my cousin keeps TF bees, and he's just up the road from me! He'll be my mentor, hopefully.

    I don't mind looking into building my own hives. I live in a suburban area though, and the lot I live on is not huge. I was probably not going to keep any more than 5 hives here.

    Luckily, my husband and brother in law have a shop full of tools that would make building my hives easy if I decide to go that route. I just haven't decided yet. There's so much info out there.

    For now I'm sticking with my plan of educating myself, gathering the most necessary equipment gradually, and getting as much hands on experience as I can throughout this next year.

    And getting lovely advice from people here! Thank you! I love hearing about all the different methods used in beekeeping.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Castlegar, BC, Canada
    Posts
    6

    Default Re: New to all of this

    Good luck, Teal. I'm just starting too, my bees will be here in April.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Washington County, Maine
    Posts
    2,767

    Default Re: New to all of this

    I know of one couple that looks to very happily married where 1 spouse works with bees and the other takes care of making, putting together and painting the woodenware. It appears to be a great partnership where both get to follow their passion and in some way share beekeeping.
    Master Beekeeper (EAS) and Master Gardener (U Maine CE) www.beeberrywoods.com

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Fairfield County, Connecticut, USA
    Posts
    3,590

    Default Re: New to all of this

    Quote Originally Posted by Teal View Post


    Also, what are you experts thoughts on Hex Hives? I know next to nothing, but I really liked the look of those hives, plus the super cool copper roof! Seems smart to me too, but again, I am a true novice here.
    I'm offering the following information purely for its entertainment value:

    Hex Hive™ is a trademark. So you will need to make a Hexagonal Hive instead.


    The owner of the trademark shows up in post #19 of the following thread.
    http://www.beesource.com/forums/show...built-hex-hive

    BeeCurious
    Trying to think inside the box...

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Lakeland, FL USA
    Posts
    784

    Default Re: New to all of this

    .

    Teal,

    I don't think this has been recommended yet, but I suggest SomdBeekeeper's podcast.

    His archives are chocked full of natural beekeeping guests.

    http://somdbeekeeper.com/

    Or

    http://somdbeekeeper.libsyn.com/webpage/2011/12
    www.savebeesflorida.com (Honeybee removals and top bar hives)

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Lakeland, FL USA
    Posts
    784

    Default Re: New to all of this

    .

    Then there is Phil Chandler's site and podcast:

    www.biobees.com

    And

    http://www.biobees.com/podcast_page.php
    www.savebeesflorida.com (Honeybee removals and top bar hives)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads