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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Hamilton, Alabama
    Posts
    1,227

    Default Re: Parker Farms January 2014 Update

    no more Big Bee Buzzes for you
    That depends on exactly what you mean by a 'BUZZ' now doesn't it?
    DarJones - 45 years, 10 colonies (max 40), sideliner, treatment free since 2005, 11 frame broodnest, small cell

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
    Posts
    5,113

    Default Re: Parker Farms January 2014 Update

    Well, I guess I'm the only one whose mind didn't go straight to drugs.
    Solomon Parker, Parker Farms, ParkerFarms.biz
    11 Years Treatment-Free, ~25 Colony Baseline

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Fort Walton Beach, Florida
    Posts
    1,256

    Default Re: Parker Farms January 2014 Update

    Solomon, I'm sorry to hear about your losses, but in at least one way it's not a complete disaster. It may actually help with some of the skeptics. That you have reported those losses should make it even more apparent that you have also been reporting your successes honestly.

    I think you'll enjoy Denver. I lived there for a while in my misspent youth and had a lot of fun. There are a lot of open-minded people there, and they make life interesting.
    Ray--1 year, 7 hives, TF

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Grand Junction, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    230

    Default Re: Parker Farms January 2014 Update

    Solomon, Good luck on your move to the great state of Colorado. Once you're up and running we can compare and contrast the difference in eastern and western Colorado bee keeping. As Jim said there are many challenges to overcome here but it can be done. Keep us posted.
    Jack Moore ~ Sticky Bear Apiary
    Zone 7a ~ Elev: 4840ft. ~ https://www.facebook.com/StickyBearApiary

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Tulsa, OK
    Posts
    3,559

    Default Re: Parker Farms January 2014 Update

    Sol, the Buzz is the last weekend in March, which reminds me that I need to get that posted. Your obviously welcome to stay with us.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,584

    Default Re: Parker Farms January 2014 Update

    I had bees in Brighton but also in Laramie. Laramie is 7,200 feet. We used to laugh at the "mile high city". We were one and a third miles... the two toughest things in Laramie were the relentless wind and we'd get a couple of weeks of -40 F. Denver is much warmer and less windy... which is not saying it's warm and windless.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,603

    Default Re: Parker Farms January 2014 Update

    Quote Originally Posted by Solomon Parker View Post
    I have a few friends who also brew who are coming along.
    And your wife? Takes me back to the 60's. Some sort of communal living by chance?
    Regards, Barry

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Hamilton, Alabama
    Posts
    1,227

    Default Re: Parker Farms January 2014 Update

    Now we know that Barry is an ex-hippie in disguise. Talk about a wolf in sheep's clothing!
    DarJones - 45 years, 10 colonies (max 40), sideliner, treatment free since 2005, 11 frame broodnest, small cell

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Colorado Springs, CO United States
    Posts
    401

    Default Re: Parker Farms January 2014 Update

    Solomon, nice to hear that you are moving to our neck of the woods. Hive lost happens, yet it is still unsettling, especially a hive like this. Hope we get to meet and pick brains. Safe travels to the Mile High,,
    Jim, it is legal to have elephants in Denver , but I am certain, this had nothing to do with the move

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
    Posts
    5,113

    Default Re: Parker Farms January 2014 Update

    Quote Originally Posted by Sticky Bear View Post
    Once you're up and running we can compare and contrast the difference in eastern and western Colorado bee keeping.
    Quote Originally Posted by fieldsofnaturalhoney View Post
    Hope we get to meet and pick brains.
    I'm looking forward to it. Right now I need to find a location to keep them. We're going to have to rent for a few years and there are several counties which don't allow bees at all. Inside city limits, most cities allow a maximum of two (dependent upon lot size). Haven't yet decided exactly where to live. It's a big area, far bigger than I am used to. I have never lived in or near a city larger than 75,000 people.
    Solomon Parker, Parker Farms, ParkerFarms.biz
    11 Years Treatment-Free, ~25 Colony Baseline

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,584

    Default Re: Parker Farms January 2014 Update

    Boulder might be worth a look if big cities aren't your thing. We lived in Brighton and we called Boulder "2 square miles surrounded by reality". It is a real different place. I could see that Mork (of Mork and Mindy) would fit right in... I was used to Denver traffic where they will run over you and cut you off just as a matter of principle, and will flip you the bird as they pass you like you are standing still because you are only doing 70 mph in a 40 mph construction zone... and I'm in Boulder pulling out of an alley. There is only one car as far as I can see in any direction. That car stops at the alley and motions for me to pull out. Only in Boulder...
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
    Posts
    5,113

    Default Re: Parker Farms January 2014 Update

    I hadn't heard that one, the one I heard was "People's Republic of..." That is my goal, but my research has shown that a few miles out of town equals far lower prices and vast improvements in the distance between houses. I'm not a city person.

    Update: I went out and collected some of the equipment from the dead hives in my home yard. I was correct with my earlier assessment. Both dead hives had gotten stuck on brood during a cold spell and starved. What has often given them a jump on the season in the past was their undoing this time 'round. The Zia hive looks like it died back in December in our first freeze, and the other one looks like it died during our most recent cold spell.

    The rest of the hives I checked had honey, but one was clustered on empty plastic frames. I ended up feeding it some sugar because I want medium frame hives alive for the future. I can requeen it later.
    Solomon Parker, Parker Farms, ParkerFarms.biz
    11 Years Treatment-Free, ~25 Colony Baseline

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
    Posts
    5,113

    Default Re: Parker Farms January 2014 Update

    Over the past week, I've done about a 90% word by word update of my website including adding a new post-mortem examination page. Check it out some time.
    Solomon Parker, Parker Farms, ParkerFarms.biz
    11 Years Treatment-Free, ~25 Colony Baseline

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
    Posts
    5,113

    Default Re: Parker Farms January 2014 Update

    After checking into the aforementioned dead hives, I discovered some very interesting things. Firstly, most of them didn't starve, at least not in the no-honey-in-the-hive sense. All but one had honey, and several didn't have brood.

    Check it out in cases 2-6. http://parkerfarms.biz/postmortem.html
    Solomon Parker, Parker Farms, ParkerFarms.biz
    11 Years Treatment-Free, ~25 Colony Baseline

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    28,064

    Default Re: Parker Farms January 2014 Update

    Pretty pitiful clusters, don't you think?
    Mark Berninghausen
    Squeak Creek Apiaries



  16. #36
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Hamilton, Alabama
    Posts
    1,227

    Default Re: Parker Farms January 2014 Update

    Those pics look a lot like tracheal mite collapse. Any chance you could do an examination on some of them and see if they were infested?
    DarJones - 45 years, 10 colonies (max 40), sideliner, treatment free since 2005, 11 frame broodnest, small cell

  17. #37
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
    Posts
    5,113

    Default Re: Parker Farms January 2014 Update

    Pitiful clusters yes, but they are dead.

    If I were interested in checking for tracheal mites, it's too late. The whole affair has already been packed up and stored.
    Solomon Parker, Parker Farms, ParkerFarms.biz
    11 Years Treatment-Free, ~25 Colony Baseline

  18. #38
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    28,064

    Default Re: Parker Farms January 2014 Update

    Were they alive they would be pitifully small clusters destined to die. Don't you think?
    Mark Berninghausen
    Squeak Creek Apiaries



  19. #39
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
    Posts
    5,113

    Default Re: Parker Farms January 2014 Update

    Good question, I'd have to let them try to find out.
    Solomon Parker, Parker Farms, ParkerFarms.biz
    11 Years Treatment-Free, ~25 Colony Baseline

  20. #40
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Morro Bay, California, USA
    Posts
    961

    Default Re: Parker Farms January 2014 Update

    I agree with Fusion on the diagnosis of Tracheal mites. You see this really rapid late fall-winter depopulation with hundreds of crawlers moving away from the hive with k-wings, not DWV.

    My feral TF experimentals get Tracheal mites in waves periodically. The conventional wisdom says Tracheal mites are becoming rare due to resistance developed in commercial breeding. I wonder if wild/feral bees are a reservoir for non-resistant types.

    Tracheal builds up in apiaries (due to drift I suppose). Good reason to keep individual groupings small --- so you disperse the risk.

    The feral bees don't develop resistance because they are already dispersed widely, and are relatively "naive" for the pest.
    One might want to import known tracheal resistant queens to mix with the locals, and brew one's own resistant strain.

    Worth having a scope around to verify the internal mites.

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