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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Manassas, Virginia, USA
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    1,106

    Default Re: drone frame for varroa control

    Quote Originally Posted by crofter View Post
    The bees draw out foundationless very quickly. These frames I wired as I planned to uncap them but you wouldnt have to especially if you take the route of cutting the whole panel out and tossing it.
    Hah! Neat! I'm new enough that I'd never seen foundationless on a Langstroth frame. I thought it was just a top-bar thing. So that's all there is to it? That goes on my list of things to try. Thanks for the absolutely great pics!

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Bonn, Germany
    Posts
    133

    Sold Out Re: drone frame for varroa control

    Quote Originally Posted by Duncan Thacker View Post
    works in Germany .....
    We have to little varroas to descern it.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Grosse Ile, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    2,901

    Default Re: drone frame for varroa control

    I like the idea of using running the plastic foundation down through the horizontal division bar to give a comb guide for the bees to start off straight with.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Hardin Cty, KY, USA
    Posts
    112

    Default Re: drone frame for varroa control

    Quote Originally Posted by sjj View Post
    We have to little varroas to descern it.
    Not my experience in Amberg!

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Manassas, Virginia, USA
    Posts
    1,106

    Default Re: drone frame for varroa control

    I dug this thread back up to ask a noobee question. I've got two hives equipped with green drone frames that have been in service about 6 weeks now. Painting a stripe of burr comb wax across the tops of these frames did generate a little interest, but they're still not drawing them out much. One of them has a little nectar stored in it. Drones are being squeezed in to comb elsewhere.

    It is finally sinking in to my thick head that I might not have put them in the right spot. If you want them to raise drones in these frames, wouldn't they have to be adjacent to the broodnest? Not just in the brood box, but adjacent to combs in which brood are being heavily tended?

    And if you pull them out to freeze them, I presume you need to close up the broodnest if it has spread beyond the drone comb?

  6. #26
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Gainesboro, Tennessee
    Posts
    100

    Default Re: drone frame for varroa control

    Quote Originally Posted by Duncan Thacker View Post
    When you see a post like this the conversation should turn to ....."(foundationless)" ....."It is difficult to find any Varroa in my hives..... THANKS Michael, Think I'll try that!!!!! Forget looking for the silver bullet, we know from experience it does not exist. Beeks have been looking for it since before the Elgon project!!!!

    OH by the way thanks to the "foundationless" pioneers
    Not to be mean but I have hundreds of Foundationless hives. These colonies are not any better at varroa. Drone comb removal is smart and profitable for the beekeeper and his bees. Beekeeping is like any other business or hobby you get what you put into it. There is no free honey.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Gainesboro, Tennessee
    Posts
    100

    Default Re: drone frame for varroa control

    Quote Originally Posted by Phoebee View Post
    I dug this thread back up to ask a noobee question. I've got two hives equipped with green drone frames that have been in service about 6 weeks now. Painting a stripe of burr comb wax across the tops of these frames did generate a little interest, but they're still not drawing them out much. One of them has a little nectar stored in it. Drones are being squeezed in to comb elsewhere.

    It is finally sinking in to my thick head that I might not have put them in the right spot. If you want them to raise drones in these frames, wouldn't they have to be adjacent to the broodnest? Not just in the brood box, but adjacent to combs in which brood are being heavily tended?

    And if you pull them out to freeze them, I presume you need to close up the broodnest if it has spread beyond the drone comb?
    Best place for them is up against a pollen frame on the edge of the broodnest in a ten frame hive it would often be positions 3 and 7. Getting the earliest spring trappings are the most valuable but the less stress the better.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    St. Petersburg, fl, USA
    Posts
    187

    Default Re: drone frame for varroa control

    yes they need to be where the queen will lay in them so put them in the brood area next to a frame of brood. When the queen starts laying in them you need to pull them and freeze them about ever two weeks. The idea is to let the mites settle in with the drones but kill the mites before they can reproduce and infest more bees. If you wait too long the drones hatch and you have actually increased your mite load. When you take out a frame replace it with another drone frame. The day before you plan to switch pull the other one out of the freezer to thaw. Scratch the caps off and shake out most of the dead drones. The bees will handle the rest. After you get drone frames built out You can rotate them every two weeks all summer long. /by the way even if you don't shake out most of the dead drones the bees will still clean out the comb it just makes more work for them lugging the dead out so I try to save them a little time and energy.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,742

    Default Re: drone frame for varroa control

    >If you want them to raise drones in these frames, wouldn't they have to be adjacent to the broodnest?

    That would be the most predictable place, yes. But I've seen a queen cross several supers to lay in drone comb when there was none in the brood nest.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Millbury, MA, USA
    Posts
    1,929

    Default Re: drone frame for varroa control

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Bush View Post
    >If you want them to raise drones in these frames, wouldn't they have to be adjacent to the broodnest?

    That would be the most predictable place, yes. But I've seen a queen cross several supers to lay in drone comb when there was none in the brood nest.

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Ithaca, NY USA
    Posts
    1,563

    Default Re: drone frame for varroa control

    Drone brood culling can be effective but the beekeeper must be absolutely diligent.
    I worked on a University study which seemed to indicate the frames could keep mite levels low all summer. Then I did a very strict trial with my own hives where I put in empty frames and cut the combs out whenever there was sealed drone brood (or honey, sometimes they get filled up with honey).

    The technique kept mites from building up until late August when the mite numbers went through the roof. I think they pick them up from robbing other mite infested hives. Lost the whole bunch, doing that technique. Can't recommend it.

  12. #32
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Concord, CA
    Posts
    4,194

    Default Re: drone frame for varroa control

    Yes plop it i the right brood area, they might draw it faster.
    Dan

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Chesterfield, NH
    Posts
    504

    Default Re: drone frame for varroa control

    I did go to a lecture by Dr.James Tew he did say that's the green frames for drones did not work well in the Southeastern part of the USA they did work well in the Northeast.



    BEE HAPPY Jim 134
    Franklin County Beekeepers Association MA.
    http://www.franklinmabeekeepers.org/

  14. #34

    Default Re: drone frame for varroa control

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Bush View Post
    Many things in life are counter intuitive. I let them build as much drone as they want (foundationless). I leave all of the drone comb and I leave all of the drones to emerge. It is difficult to find any Varroa in my hives. It may make it better...

    Quote Originally Posted by Duncan Thacker View Post
    When you see a post like this the conversation should turn to ....."(foundationless)" ....."It is difficult to find any Varroa in my hives..... THANKS Michael, Think I'll try that!!!!! Forget looking for the silver bullet, we know from experience it does not exist. Beeks have been looking for it since before the Elgon project!!!!
    I have to somewhat agree with Michael Bush. What he did not say, was that what he described is a part of a treatment free operation, which has been going on for a while. If you right now start and let them raise drones as much they want, sure it will be a disaster. But in the long run they play a vital part in all successfull treatment free beekeeping efforts. How could it be otherwise? They bring 50% of the genes.

    I have some observations of my hives (all TF) that strong hives which have mite load (infestation) going up, above some limit maybe, make a lot of dronebrood and "trap" mites themselves. Then they drag out the infested drones and get the varroa mites in control. Drones are also, because of their haploid genetics or just because they are made in the sides of broodnest, more vulnerable against chalkbrood and other diseases and viruses, and these diseases fight the mites too.

    ( My hives have 2 inces free space under the frames of the bottom box)
    Treatment free, honey production, isolation mated queens, www.saunalahti.fi/lunden/varroakertomus.html

  15. #35
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Baden Wurtemburg Germany
    Posts
    185

    Default Re: drone frame for varroa control

    Not mine in Kippenheim too!
    Stephen 26 hives. 4th year. Treat. Germany.

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Manassas, Virginia, USA
    Posts
    1,106

    Default Re: drone frame for varroa control

    So far what I'm seeing is no drones on the green frames. Where they've drawn it out they seem to be using it for nectar.

    Maybe next year.

    The green nectar frame is one of those that I failed to place next to the broodnest.

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