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Thread: Black Locust!

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    46,593

    Default Re: Black Locust!

    Most of our "weeds" are nonnative and were brought here on purpose by the Europeans as medicine. I dont' think we should eradicte the apple trees... or pears etc. etc. etc...
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Manassas, Virginia, USA
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    1,070

    Default Re: Black Locust!

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Bush View Post
    >There has been a large push to remove it from the environment. It has become an very invasive non-native plant.

    It is a native American plant. It would have been planted in MA sooner or later by someone, I'm surprised the American Indians didn't beat the colonists to it and then the colonists would have thought it was native... in fact at that point in time it would be. This whole take that everything non-native is evil is a very interesting view since based on current beliefs that would send all Europeans home and get rid of all the honeybees...
    Uuuh, white man come, bring stinging fly, and plant ugly thorn tree from our enemies on the Pawtomac.

    My favorite example is the sportsmen all up in arms over the invasion of "snakeheads" on the Potomac River. They weep over the devastation of their favorite sportfish, widemouth bass. But if you check, those were introduced on the Potomac in the 1800's, and were the snakeheads of their day.

    Personally, I'd like to flay alive the people who introduced gypsy moth and the "Tree of Heaven." Or Dutch Elm Disease. I'm not a fan of the wooly adelgid, either. Oh, and how do you guys feel about the varroa mite?

    Some are good, though. Did you know earthworms are not native to most of North America, either? And most of our food crops are imported.

    I actually feel guilty about introducing Apis m. to our little paradise. We have a healthy stock of native bees (although I find a badminton racket can make individual carpenter bees less healthy when they bore into the cabin). We're limiting our hives in part because we don't want to totally displace the native pollinators.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,593

    Default Re: Black Locust!

    I think introducing new species is unwise as we never know the outcome until later. But trying to eradicate what has already become part of the ecosystem is a waste of effort that only unbalances things more.

    As a Lakota I definitely see a down side to invasive species and varieties... but what is here is here.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Mifflin PA USA
    Posts
    66

    Default Re: Black Locust!

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Bush View Post
    I think introducing new species is unwise as we never know the outcome until later. But trying to eradicate what has already become part of the ecosystem is a waste of effort that only unbalances things more.

    As a Lakota I definitely see a down side to invasive species and varieties... but what is here is here.
    Wisdom spoken, very easy to get on to a cause and fail to see the world around it.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Lipik, Croatia
    Posts
    61

    Default Re: Black Locust!

    I adore when is black locust forage, weather appropriate and bees in top form. In peak of forage they can bring easily over 10kg per day per hive ( some say 18kg) in our conditions.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Mifflin PA USA
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    66

    Default Re: Black Locust!

    Black Locust is our first major flow if conditions are right, and the honey is delectable.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Randolph county,WV,USA
    Posts
    15

    Default Re: Black Locust!

    We live in the Mts. of W.Va.and the locust has only bloomed 1 time in 3 years,maybe this year

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Aurora,CO
    Posts
    20

    Default Re: Black Locust!

    It has it's good and bad points.. higher BTU's for firewood, nitrogen fixing, can handle coppice, pretty good rot resistance for use as posts... but it's also toxic to livestock.

    (Earthworms- separate tangent.. we do have some natives- many are being pushed out by invasives. Glaciated areas around the Great Lakes & the forests of the NE are being altered by their presence as that ecosystem evolved without them. Sugar maples in particular they are finding to be more stressed.)

    Can't stop it.. with movement comes new introductions. (Can put on football padding/ helmet, grab a net and come fishing not far from here where the Asian carp are plenty.)

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Stockholm, NJ, USA
    Posts
    68

    Default Re: Black Locust!

    I live in northern NJ and I got 5 black locust trees from the forest in November of 2012. they lined the road. They were dormant, I planted them and they sprouted late spring. They trunck were about 1" circumference and over 5 feet tall. Of course, I pruned them. They grow quickly. Oh, only one did not make it. The root rotted at the ball joint. The best thing they were free. I have seen linden trees in the forest too, but I already paid a hefty price for one. I already have my eyes on a sassafra tree at my place of work. So, for forest trees, don't go to the nursery, wait until the ones in the forest go dormant and dig them up and plant it right away on your property. If you still insist on a nursery stock wait for late fall or early winter when they are heavily discounted. I bought a $159 tulip tree at 75% discount for $40 and a $200 Raintree for $50 and a bunch of cleomatis and viney plants for less than $20 dollars each. Bottomline, the ones in the forest are hardier and will transplant well in late fall when they are dormant.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Manassas, Virginia, USA
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    1,070

    Default Re: Black Locust!

    Thanks, Roberto, because you make me realize how lucky we are to be surrounded by most of what you've been paying for.

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Benton, KY
    Posts
    128

    Default Re: Black Locust!

    Finding black locust of any size is difficult on any farm of my family. We have used them as fence posts for years, and cut the suckers off ASAP because the thorns would puncture tires. Now I'm beekeeping tryingto change 75 years of mindset. My brother is excited as he thinks I'm growing fence posts for him

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Big Stone Gap, VA
    Posts
    988

    Default Re: Black Locust!

    Quote Originally Posted by Goran View Post
    I adore when is black locust forage, weather appropriate and bees in top form. In peak of forage they can bring easily over 10kg per day per hive ( some say 18kg) in our conditions.


    Like others have said, we don't have a big black locust flow every year. Last year was a very good locust flow here. My biggest is maybe 20' tall and has not bloomed yet. I have seen trees as small as six or seven feet bloom.

    Shane

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Big Stone Gap, VA
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    988

    Default Re: Black Locust!

    Quote Originally Posted by The Valley View Post
    Black Locust is our first major flow if conditions are right, and the honey is delectable.
    Black Locust is one of my favorite types of honey as well. To me, it is better than our storied sourwood.

    Shane

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Benton, KY
    Posts
    128

    Default Re: Black Locust!

    I didn't grow up knowing what black locust was, but my dad cut all those thorn trees for fence post and burnt the rest so it wouldn't stob a tractor tire

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Morris Plains, NJ USA
    Posts
    251

    Default Re: Black Locust!

    There are many, many black locust trees in my New Jersey area, many 80 feet high; will the bees fly to these altitudes for pollen?

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Great Falls Montana
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    4,165

    Default Re: Black Locust!

    Yes and for the nectar. I understand Black locust can be a good flow in certain years.

  17. #37
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Meadows of Dan, Virginia, United States
    Posts
    197

    Default Re: Black Locust!

    You could plant several acres of black locust as a cash crop. Once established, you could cut trees for firewood on a rotational basis. New saplings spring up from the stump with vigor. You would have a perpetual source of income from firewood, and in years of good bloom, the possibility of some great honey. Also, as mentioned in your opening post, you could begin with a cover crop of clover.

  18. #38
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Indiana, Clay County
    Posts
    569

    Default Re: Black Locust!

    Black locust is a good honey when it comes here; this yr we will miss it with what looks like is a early dry period. I would plant late summer forage , not spring/early summer producers

  19. #39
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    St. Albans, Vermont
    Posts
    5,545

    Default Re: Black Locust!

    I planted 100 Locust whips in about 1985. After 10 years they were 15' tall and covered with blossoms…but not a huge nectar source yet. Today they're 30' tall and have a huge number of blossoms.

  20. #40
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Gainesboro, Tennessee
    Posts
    94

    Default Re: Black Locust!

    black locust trees bloom fast here but are half the time low yielding. The Virginia creeper kills many of ours. I would focus on evodia (bee bee trees) instead. if it is a valuable tree you want.

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