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Thread: side bar design

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Grosse Ile, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    2,864

    Default side bar design

    I plan to make some homemade frames sometime, but would like to know if there is some particular reason why the current sidebar design has only about 1/3 (don't have one in front of me) of the sidebar tapered for the bee space instead of more than that? Why not only have about an inch of stock at the top and then start the taper or bee space? Seems like less adjoining wood on the sidebars would be less to propolize up and easier to separate.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Jacksonville, Florida
    Posts
    1,646

    Default Re: side bar design

    Yes, I'm pretty sure its so there is less wood touching. So the bees have less to propalize together.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Mtn. View, Arkansas, USA
    Posts
    1,271

    Default Re: side bar design

    If you transported a box with frame with only 1 inch wood at the top the bottom of the frames would slap together and crush bees. You would need a projection of some sort about 3.5 to 4 inches from the top to prevent this. If you are only making a few frames, make the end bars straight and use screws, screweyes, staples or nails to get the bee space. A screweye in the top bar and one in the lower part of the end bar facing away from you on the right and the same facing toward you on the left and you have your bee space.

    If you do very many homemade frames then removing wood like the standard frame would be very much faster than the above. The nice thing about the screweyes is the small area that is propolized.
    37 years - 25 colonies - IPM disciple - naturally skeptic

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    1,501

    Default Re: side bar design

    Quote Originally Posted by AR Beekeeper View Post
    If you transported a box with frame with only 1 inch wood at the top the bottom of the frames would slap together and crush bees. You would need a projection of some sort about 3.5 to 4 inches from the top to prevent this. If you are only making a few frames, make the end bars straight and use screws, screweyes, staples or nails to get the bee space. A screweye in the top bar and one in the lower part of the end bar facing away from you on the right and the same facing toward you on the left and you have your bee space.

    If you do very many homemade frames then removing wood like the standard frame would be very much faster than the above. The nice thing about the screweyes is the small area that is propolized.
    To the same point for vertical alignment too, to avoid angel frames, keeping them parallel to eachother.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Grosse Ile, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    2,864

    Default Re: side bar design

    That makes sense, I figured there was a good reason most manufacturers make the side bars that way. Thanks.

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