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  1. #81
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    Jul 2010
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    moravia,ny
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    Default Re: For those who build your own, which table saw?

    as fosion power states the most important key is a sharp blade. root co used to make bee equip. (at the time dadants only competition) they made frames of the highest quality. thier secert was one key employee who only sharpened blades. the finish was so smooth that every piece seemed sanded. the wobble blade may work but it cuts sideways as well as ahead at the same time. It hacks it way thru the wood. kind of crude.

  2. #82
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
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    Bertie County,NC
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    870

    Default Re: For those who build your own, which table saw?

    actually, The HP of the motor isn't really a big deal. What you really need to pay close attention to is the amps of the motor. The higher the amps the better. Stay away from saws with 10-11 amps. Try and make sure you get AT THE VERY LEAST 13 amps...15 would even be better. I was a carpenter in a former life, and when it comes to power tools...amps are the key.

    also like others have said, you will want to make sure the arbor bolt is long enough for the dado sets...I think if a wobble will fit, then a stacked set will also fit, and you can decide which one you like the best.

  3. #83
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
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    Park City Ky
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    1,896

    Default Re: For those who build your own, which table saw?

    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel Y View Post
    1.5 HP or less go with a 6 inch dado set. 1.75 HP and more and you can go up to the 8 inch stack set.
    Daniel and others..... We need to caution new woodworkers here to check how high their blade will extend. If you build a sled for your box joint, some saws will not adjust high enough to cut the box joint. It will require an 8 inch dado set.

    If I were going to use sleds I would just go ahead and get an 8 inch set.

    cchoganjr

  4. #84
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    Utica, NY
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    Default Re: For those who build your own, which table saw?

    Just for I threw the dado on and cut a pass full width 13/16+. It cut like butter through hard rock maple with less vibration then the 10 inch blade I took off to test this thing. Makes sense because the dado is much smaller in dia.

    http://i697.photobucket.com/albums/v...pse0d58930.jpg

    http://i697.photobucket.com/albums/v...ps407dc17b.jpg

    At maximum setting the sides will not be exactly 90 and the bottom is a tad cupped. I miked up about a .010 ~ in cup.
    Last edited by Barry; 01-23-2014 at 06:17 PM. Reason: warning
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  5. #85
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Hamilton, Alabama
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    1,212

    Default Re: For those who build your own, which table saw?

    The higher the amps the better. Stay away from saws with 10-11 amps. Try and make sure you get AT THE VERY LEAST 13 amps...15 would even be better. I was a carpenter in a former life, and when it comes to power tools...amps are the key.
    I used to be an electric motor service technician. While I get your point, I have to disagree with the too broad statement. A series motor such as most skillsaws or drills can be compared based on amps. This cannot be done with either induction start induction run or capacitor start induction run motors such as are common on tablesaws. The capacitor start induction run motor has excellent startup torque and high efficiency while running. This type motor is common on Craftsman saws. Induction start induction run motors are also used on many craftsman saws because they are cheaper to make but reasonably durable. They have a serious weakness because startup torque is low.

    These motors should be compared based on output horsepower, not on amps. As a general rule of thumb, an 8 inch table saw needs a minimum of 3/4 HP in a capacitor start motor and 1 HP for induction start. A 10 inch table saw needs a 1 HP capacitor start and 1.5 HP induction start. A 12 inch table saw needs at least a 2 HP capacitor start and 3 HP induction start. These are "minimum" ratings, a larger motor has advantages in terms of cutting faster and less problems with binding and burning wood edges.

    My 10 inch craftsman table saw has a 1 HP capacitor motor that has cut thousands of board feet of wood over the last 38 years. If and when I have to replace it, I will go for a 1.5 or 2 HP capacitor motor.
    DarJones - 44 years, 10 colonies (max 40), sideliner, treatment free since 2005, 11 frame broodnest, small cell

  6. #86
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    Jul 2012
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    Bertie County,NC
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    Default Re: For those who build your own, which table saw?

    Quote Originally Posted by Fusion_power View Post

    My 10 inch craftsman table saw has a 1 HP capacitor motor that has cut thousands of board feet of wood over the last 38 years. If and when I have to replace it, I will go for a 1.5 or 2 HP capacitor motor.
    I would be curious as to the amps on the motor that is on it?

  7. #87
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    Sep 2011
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    Reno, NV
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    Default Re: For those who build your own, which table saw?

    NewJoe, It stands to reason that the manufacturer of hudnreds of thousands of pieces of equipment over the span of decades did not choose the wrong unit of measurement of their equipments power.

    Amperage dos not even have anything to do with the power equipment puts out. it has more to do with what it can withstand.

    You recommend a 15 amp motor that will most likely be plugged into a 115 volt 14 gauge duplex outlet that is protected by a 15 amp breaker. I woudl prefer a 10 amp motor that generates 1.5 hp over one that is 13 amp and generates 1 hp.
    Stand for what you believe, even if you stand alone.

  8. #88
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    Default Re: For those who build your own, which table saw?

    replaced post with following post
    Last edited by NewJoe; 01-24-2014 at 08:23 AM.

  9. #89
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    Jul 2012
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    Bertie County,NC
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    870

    Default Re: For those who build your own, which table saw?

    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel Y View Post
    NewJoe, It stands to reason that the manufacturer of hudnreds of thousands of pieces of equipment over the span of decades did not choose the wrong unit of measurement of their equipments power.

    .
    here is some other information from another source (not me). http://professional-power-tool-guide...wer-and-volts/

    Amps

    A tools amp rating indicates the electrical current load a motor can carry for an indefinite period of time without degrading the insulation and other electrical compounds of the motor. In a UL tested tool, the motor is tested to verify that it can run or operate below a specific temperature while current or electricity is flowing through it. So in essence how much can the motor absorb and dissipate heat. Motor speed is important. The faster a motor can spin the more air it can draw through the motor to help cool it down. So amps measures or indicates the maximum time a tool can continuously run without exceeding the temperature limits. Amps basically measure how effectively the motor cools itself, not how much power it has. With this in mind, more amps can be good because motors will run longer and won’t heat up as fast. Remember heat is what kills a motor. Have you ever popped a circuit breaker on the panel? This can be annoying, but it protects your tools. Notice when you’re popping the breaker your tool is probably bogging down causing more heat to build up and in return drawing more amps.

    Horsepower

    Horsepower is a mathematical expression of the relationship between speed and torque. Again horse power is misleading because it is a mathematical equation and the manufacture can either use sustained or stalled toque; and thus you can get two different numbers. Most manufactures use peak power (stalling point) as the higher number. This is a bogus measure because it shows the highest output possible. If you did that to your tool you would burn the motor out very quickly because of the high current and high heat build up. So in reality it is not a realistic number measure




    I certainly am no expert, But over the last 30+ years I have owned and used a lot of power tools, several of which have been table saws.

  10. #90
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    Default Re: For those who build your own, which table saw?

    Quote Originally Posted by NewJoe View Post
    So in reality it is not a realistic number measure

    It is a realistic number when you are comparing motors of the same age. No different than lawn mower engines. A standard is set and everyone has to go by that standard.

    In the normal operation of things current (Amps) relates to torque. Typically the more amps a motor draws the more torque it will put out. Everything has its limits so if you pull down the rpms of the motor below its normal operating speed it will draw more current with less torque. You can get into this situation very easily with a stack blade set. If your motor (single phase) is having a hard time coming up to speed it is in this situation and it is not good.

    This is a good graphic representation:

    http://elpaso.apogee.net/md/mfcttor.asp
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  11. #91
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    Default Re: For those who build your own, which table saw?

    Quote Originally Posted by Acebird View Post
    It is a realistic number when you are comparing motors of the same age. No different than lawn mower engines. A standard is set and everyone has to go by that standard.

    In the normal operation of things current (Amps) relates to torque. Typically the more amps a motor draws the more torque it will put out. .
    The statement about HP not being realistic, was not me speaking...this was a quote from the referenced website.

    When you say Amps relates to torque....isn't torque what most of us interpret as power? Isn't torque what would give a blade the "power" to complete a task?

  12. #92
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    Nov 2011
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    Rader, Greene County, Tennessee, USA
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    Default Re: For those who build your own, which table saw?

    Quote Originally Posted by Acebird View Post
    In the normal operation of things current (Amps) relates to torque. Typically the more amps a motor draws the more torque it will put out.
    Not true!

    Consider an induction motor on a tablesaw that is set up for 115 volt operation and draws 15 amps. Lets presume that that combination results in 1.5 HP.

    Now change the connections on that motor so that it is set up for 230 volts (and plug it into the appropriate plug). That motor STILL produces 1.5 HP, but the amps to do so have been cut in half to 7.5 amps (disregarding the minor efficiency gained in using a higher voltage).


    Or, if you look at it going the other way - changing from 230 volts to 115 volts, the amps required have been doubled, but with no change in ("torque") horsepower results.




    In relatively simple terms, the horsepower output of a motor is calculated as a product of (amps * voltage / (efficiency factor)). Note that (volts * amps) is a calculation of watts. Here is a reference:
    http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/el...wer-d_653.html

    .
    Last edited by Rader Sidetrack; 01-24-2014 at 12:09 PM. Reason: add reference
    Graham
    -- The real problem is not precise language, it's clear language. - Richard Feynman

  13. #93
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Rome, GA
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    155

    Default Re: For those who build your own, which table saw?

    Thanks for everyone's Help! I went looked at the saw today. It definitely needs a little TLC, but it runs quiet, straight and true and the blade felt solid as a rock. The fence was straight and solid. This saw will not have any problems cutting anything I need. I still won't know for sure about the dado till I try. The nuts on the arbor look like their one solid piece with the stabilizing washer. I ended up picking it up for $65.
    But ya know what??? I've spent more than $65 eating out with my wife, and didn't even like the meal.
    Either way, I will get a lot of use out of this saw.

    Thanks again,
    DD
    Let's Eat Grandmaw ........... Let's Eat, Grandmaw.......Grammar Saves Lives

  14. #94
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Midland, MI
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    584

    Default Re: For those who build your own, which table saw?

    Glad you got a saw! even if you can;t run a dado, you can make everything you need as it is. I make everything, frames too, and don;t use a dado set. The dado set would make thigns faster for me at some stages, but I'll likely never exceed a dozen hives, so I"m okay with spending a little bit of time here and there.

  15. #95
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    Nov 2011
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    Rader, Greene County, Tennessee, USA
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    Default Re: For those who build your own, which table saw?

    Congratulation on purchasing a saw!

    Note that with a stack dado set, if you don't have enough arbor length for a full 3/4" dado cut, you can put on fewer chippers and still make it work - but you may need two passes.

    The chippers are the odd looking blades (2 or 4 arms) that go between the fully formed outer blades in a stack set.
    Graham
    -- The real problem is not precise language, it's clear language. - Richard Feynman

  16. #96
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    Feb 2010
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    Park City Ky
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    Default Re: For those who build your own, which table saw?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ddawg View Post
    But ya know what??? I've spent more than $65 eating out with my wife, and didn't even like the meal. DD
    If you are taking your wife out to eat, it isn't the meal that counts. It is the points.

    About the dado. If you are only going to make equipment for yourself, make 1/2 inch box joints, or make 7 /16 inch. Number of joints doesn't really matter unless you are trying to maintain industry standard appearance.

    cchoganjr
    Last edited by Cleo C. Hogan Jr; 01-24-2014 at 05:11 PM.

  17. #97
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    Dec 1999
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    DuPage County, Illinois USA
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    9,507

    Default Re: For those who build your own, which table saw?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ddawg View Post
    I still won't know for sure about the dado till I try.
    And if you can't get 3/4" worth on there, make 5/8" dados.
    Regards, Barry

  18. #98
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    Feb 2012
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    Rome, GA
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    155

    Default Re: For those who build your own, which table saw?

    Quote Originally Posted by Cleo C. Hogan Jr View Post

    About the dado. If you are only going to make equipment for yourself, make 1/2 inch box joints, or make 7 /16 inch. Number of joints doesn't really matter unless you are trying to maintain industry standard appearance.

    cchoganjr
    I never even considered that!! Yes I am only making equipment for my personal use.

    Thanks
    Let's Eat Grandmaw ........... Let's Eat, Grandmaw.......Grammar Saves Lives

  19. #99
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    Sep 2011
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    Reno, NV
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    Default Re: For those who build your own, which table saw?

    Part of the reason or I should say advantage of making it yourself is making it your way. More finger on a box joint. smaller bottom bars or larger if that is what you want. thicker top bars.

    What I would not stray away from is the overall outside dimensions of the boxes. Sooner or later you are going to get some standard commercial made equipment and you will most likely want it to match. But you can make extra deep frame rests and fill it back in with angle iron if that is what you want. You can make a whole assortment of corner joints not just box joints. You may find you like a splined or lock miter joint the best. Figure out how to make that all one piece double deep box. the perfect brood nest solution. Make an improved entrance reducer.

    You may have opened a whole can of works buying a saw.
    Stand for what you believe, even if you stand alone.

  20. #100
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    Mar 2011
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    Utica, NY
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    Default Re: For those who build your own, which table saw?

    Quote Originally Posted by NewJoe View Post
    When you say Amps relates to torque....isn't torque what most of us interpret as power? Isn't torque what would give a blade the "power" to complete a task?
    Mechanical power is torque times speed. Electrical power is current times voltage. So to simplify you can think of current being the torque factor and voltage being the speed factor.
    For a DC (direct current) motor amps relates directly to torque almost exactly. It is practically a straight line curve. An AC motor doesn't follow exactly because there is frequency involved but it does follow in the portion of the curve around the stated RPM of the motor. It is only when you pull the motor down (out of phase) that bad things happen. Variable speed AC drives (inverters) work by changing the frequency and voltage. In so doing the HP varies with the speed. For the most part any AC motor can be variable speed by using an inverter (AC drive).
    Last edited by Acebird; 01-25-2014 at 04:03 PM. Reason: changed phase to frequency
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

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