Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Debert, Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts
    12

    Default leak proofing tray feeders

    I have sealed my wooden tray top feeders with silicone and it has lasted quite well, but now some are starting to leak and so last year I tested them all before using them and re-siliconed a few. When I made a new batch of feeders I tried doing the seams with fibre glass resin and that experiment was not very successful. I recently spotted a product in a hardware store that I was not familiar with called "Liquid Rubber" that is billed as a "Flexible heavy duty waterproof coating". I thought I'd give it a try. Has anyone in bee land used it or something similar and do you have an opinion on the product?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    High Hil, MO
    Posts
    6

    Default Re: leak proofing tray feeders

    You might also consider using spray on bed liner that you can get in an aerosol can. It worked for me, just let it air for a couple days before use.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Debert, Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts
    12

    Default Re: leak proofing tray feeders

    Quote Originally Posted by Handloader View Post
    You might also consider using spray on bed liner that you can get in an aerosol can. It worked for me, just let it air for a couple days before use.
    Thanks for your suggestion. The product I am going to try says -on the can - that it can also be used for a bed liner, so it will likely work. It is a brush on rather than an aerosol ... so maybe it will work out to be a cheaper solution.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    carney, maryland, USA
    Posts
    602

    Default Re: leak proofing tray feeders

    Quote Originally Posted by Handloader View Post
    You might also consider using spray on bed liner that you can get in an aerosol can. It worked for me, just let it air for a couple days before use.
    Do you have a brand name and part number/description?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Debert, Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts
    12

    Default Re: leak proofing tray feeders

    Quote Originally Posted by philip.devos View Post
    Do you have a brand name and part number/description?
    The brand name is Liquid Rubber and here is the company web site. http://www.liquidrubber.ca/

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    High Hil, MO
    Posts
    6

    Default Re: leak proofing tray feeders

    What I have been using is a 3M brand that my brother in law give from his body shop. His cost was about $2 a can so I don't know what it would be on the shelf. He has since went to getting it in bulk and it can be rolled on but the preferred method is spraying as this covers better and uses less material. Not sure but I think the new brand is lineX. Hope this helps as I've had really good luck with it. I may try to do the outside of a couple boxes instead of paint. Any thoughts?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Debert, Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts
    12

    Default Re: leak proofing tray feeders

    I thought I replied yesterday, but I see my answer didn't show up ... I'm new to this technology. The product is "Liquid Rubber". The manufacturer's web site is LiquidRubber.ca
    Quote Originally Posted by philip.devos View Post
    Do you have a brand name and part number/description?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Debert, Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts
    12

    Default Re: leak proofing tray feeders

    Quote Originally Posted by Handloader View Post
    What I have been using is a 3M brand that my brother in law give from his body shop. His cost was about $2 a can so I don't know what it would be on the shelf. He has since went to getting it in bulk and it can be rolled on but the preferred method is spraying as this covers better and uses less material. Not sure but I think the new brand is lineX. Hope this helps as I've had really good luck with it. I may try to do the outside of a couple boxes instead of paint. Any thoughts?
    I wrap my hives for winter, either homemade hive cozies or, when I run out of them, black pallet wrap, and I've found that since the wrap traps moisture, latex paint is better than oil based. It seems that latex is more breathable. Oil based paint sometimes lifts and flakes. I'm kind of wondering if a rubber based covering on the outside of the hive bodies would trap moisture in the wood, which might be a problem if the bees couldn't fan it out of there. In a less northerly climate than the one I live in it might not be a problem. I like the price of the product you use; my quart can of liquid rubber cost $22.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    High Hil, MO
    Posts
    6

    Default Re: leak proofing tray feeders

    I think that you may get into moisture problems if you sealed the outside of your box with either rubber product but it would be worth a try on a hive or two just for the knowledge of it and to share with others. I used it strictly for building feeders as a waterproofing sealer. I also thought of using this in place of metal covers but haven't made the move yet.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Manassas, Virginia, USA
    Posts
    1,069

    Default Re: leak proofing tray feeders

    I'm supposed to pick up a quart of Camcoat food grade epoxy coating tomorrow, if the shipment arrives on time. Brushy Mountain sells it. I have a couple of new wooden top feeders and it just seems really weird to pour syrup into wooden tanks. I don't worry about paint for the outside of the hives, but anything in contact with things bees consume that has a chemical odor (bed liner, bar counter urethane, etc.) as it cures makes me suspicious. But I have no idea if it will hold up so check back in a year and I'll tell you if I think it was a good idea.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Morris Plains, NJ USA
    Posts
    251

    Default Re: leak proofing tray feeders

    I simply buy plastic food containers at WalMart and cut them down to fit. Very cheap and will never lead.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads