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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    McClure, OH
    Posts
    1,017

    Default Re: Am I on the right track?

    If the list is from your cart, I don't see bottom board, inner cover (if using) and top cover (either migratory or telescoping). What are you using for hive stand? I use concrete blocks, others make special stands.

    I agree with the other posters with sticking with one size boxes for brood and supers. Keep in mind the frame size of the nucs you're ordering the brood boxes. Personally, I would get at least a jacket until you get comfortable with bees. I also use regular leather work gloves.

    I am not sure if you get a cardboard nuc or a wood box. I would keep 1 extra hive setup (nuc) in case you end up with a swarm.

    Some more thoughts (you've got most of it covered): http://www.donnellyfarmsohio.com/201...hive-kits.html

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Colorado Springs, CO United States
    Posts
    377

    Default Re: Am I on the right track?

    Quote Originally Posted by hjsmith00843 View Post
    after doing some research in my local area I have located some used hives and supers. Picking them up early next week. I will be getting 5 sets. (minus frames) for cheaper than one of the new hives.

    He said they are not rotted in anyway but they could use a cleaning and paint. I think that will be a fun project for the winter months getting the used hives refurbished.
    Be careful of used equipment, things may be lurking,,,

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Hartville, Missouri, USA
    Posts
    125

    Default Re: Am I on the right track?

    Just my two cents worth: I got a frame grip and get a lot of use out of it. I wear gloves, so it makes it much easier to get a grip. For a hive tool, I really like the ones with a "J" shape on the end--they are excellent for prying out the frames when the bees glue them to the frame rests with propolis. Regarding queen excluders, I have never used one and never needed one. A couple came with the equipment I bought, and they have sat in a shed for a dozen years. And save up some corrugated cardboard, the plain brown kind with no ink and no tape, to roll up and use for smoker fuel. A smoker giving you trouble is a hassle when you are new to bees (and all other times too). I found the cardboard to be the most reliable smoker fuel. Some people recommend pine needles--I don't have them so I don't know. Also, not to confuse things, but I am switching over to all 8-frame mediums and wish I had started that way. Of course I haven't done it yet so it's just an idea.

    Good luck and welcome to beekeeping.
    Hobbyist beekeeper since 2002

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Midland, MI
    Posts
    577

    Default Re: Am I on the right track?

    The problem with beekeeping is that there are so many different ways to set things up. I made all of my own gear, so i tried a number of different configurations to see what i like best and what worked easiest for me. I bought a boardman feeder, but when i saw it out of the box, i decided that i'd never use it. I also purchased a frame feeder, but was unhappy with the drowned bees. I made a few miller style hive top feeders, and they work GREAT, but it's not fun to remove a full feeder for hive inspections. For hives close to home that can be easily checked, I'm converting to 1/2 gallong mason jars to feed through migratory covers. For my hives far from home, i'll probably still use the miller feeders.

    I thought i was going to be some magical bee whisperer and only use a veil, but I quickly realized that thousands of bees flying around made me a bit nervous. I cobbled togetehr a suit out of tyvex painters suits, but it was so overwhelmingly hot inside that it was not fun to wear. I bought a full suit off of of ebay for a reasonable price and I love it. it's not a fancy super vented turbo suit, but it's much better than tyvek. I'd rather slip into that than mess about with tying the darn strings on my hat/veil. I think this single item made working with bees much more enjoyable.

    My suit came with leather bee gloves, but they are so bulky that I don't like to wear them. I usually wear rubber dishwashing gloves, which are affordable and last about a season or so. Sometimes I wear nitrile gloves that I have around the shop. FWIW, i have been stung through the nitrile once, but the stinger didn;t stick in me. the leather gloves have taken a number of stings, but they have not penetrated to my skin.

    I bought and made a number of hive tools. I forged one that is very similar in design to the "j-hook" style tool. I use this one the most because it makes lifting the frames out so much easier. i just hooj the "J" under the frame top rail and lift it enough to get my fingers on it.

    Regarding hive finishes, i have played with varnishes, urathanes, and paints. While i like the look of stained and varnished wood, its much faster to simply paint them. I like the oil based paints, but they take a long time to dry completely and cleanup is tougher than with latex. I now use only quality latex paint. I tried a gallon of the cheap stuff, but it takes twice as many coats, which is jsut more time and hassle. Good quality exterior latex is the way to go for me. I buy the "oops" paint at whatever place I happen to be.

    There are lots of ways to do any one thing in beekeeping. I wouldn't get held up on the idea of doing any one thing a certain way until you get to playing with the bees for a little while. I've had a number of convictions change as I learn about my bees, and about my beekeeping ideas and beliefs.

    Welcome to the hobby! I hope it brings you as much joy as it has brought me. It really is pretty fun, and as others have mentioned, somewhat addicting.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Myrtle Beach SC
    Posts
    106

    Default Re: Am I on the right track?

    I understand everyone has their own way of doing things. This is why I hope to find someone to mentor me before I get started very heavily. I think I have someone that may be putting bee's on my property this spring and maybe mentor me while he is working his hives. It is not a done deal but it is a possibility. I really appreciate all of the comments and suggestions so far.

    All of them seem so informative and the willingness for everyone to help is mind blowing. I have done a lot of reading about bees and how the population is dying off in the wild. I think it is doing the community a favor by having a few hives. Lots of farm area's within a 2 mile radius.

    I understand that the used hives could possibly have things that could be harmful to the new colonies that I will be introducing in Arpil. I will clean each hive out meticulously and I plan to refurbish them ilke new condition.

    Right now I am still in the research and learning stage. I will not even take possession of my first nucs for a few months. This should give me a little time to absorb as much info as I possibly can. I am sure my mind will change a few times over on supplies and equipment before I even start.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Lassen, California, USA
    Posts
    133

    Default Re: Am I on the right track?

    You will learn! I am a first time keeper also. Have 2 hives, all set up, will pick up bees mid April, like you. I have made one Quilt so far, need to make another one. I have made 2 - 2" boxes, for feeding sugar cakes. I'm headed outside this morning to make a swarm catch box. I am not handy at woodworking either, this is my first attempt, tons of good info on YouTube.
    Good luck! And have fun, I'm having a blast and don't even have bees yet!

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Arbutus, MD USA
    Posts
    64

    Default Re: Am I on the right track?

    And hive stands are something that you cwn consider...anything is possible from cinder blocks to manufactured plastic, to formed stainless tubing. Some manufactured models come with frame holders, which are not much more than hangers to accommodate 3 or 4 frames while you dig into the main hive during inspections et al.
    Returning to stands, someone suggested to me to do the following:
    Buy a PT 2X6X12. Cut off two 14" pieces. Fasten each of those across the remaining two long sections, forming sort of a hybrid capital H, if you will. This will hold two hives.

    Anyway, get something built to keep your girls off the ground. When you are manipulating hives, it will wind up helping your back most of the time too.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Shickshinny, Pennsylvania
    Posts
    842

    Default Re: Am I on the right track?

    Hope things go good for you there's alot of good help on beesource , I just started this past spring , my biggest mistake was trying to go with deep brood box's and med. honey supers because I had deep nucs coming to start off with . Also I didn't believe how heavy a deep box full of honey and or brood can really be , I shrugged it off , they can honestly be 80 to 90 pds , not sure of your age so be careful .I didn't understand the value of being able to interchange frames of the same size with all of my box's , I bet its one of the most common mistakes for a new beekeeper as far as equipment goes .The medium box for everything is probably the most common in 10 frame but 8 frame is used alot also .Many beeks have had to cut all there equip. down to med size to get everything to a standard size . Like others have told you most nucs come in the deep size and they won't fit a med box and thats what mess's things up , if you can find med. nuc's thats the way to go . Cutting down the used equipment you found is a breeze with a table saw as far as the box's go , but I wouldn't suggest you do it with frames unless you are really familiar with woodworking tools , your bottom boards and tops and inner covers will all fit your med 10 frame box but be careful 8 frame won't , there narrower . Good luck Bruce
    Second Year 4 Hives T USDA Zone 5b

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,120

    Default Re: Am I on the right track?

    >2 10-Frame Complete Hives not assembled
    I'd get all eight frame mediums... those deeps weight 90 pounds when they get full of honey...

    >20 black 8-3/8 plastic foundation (ea)
    I'd get Mann Lake PF120s (which fit the mediums) for the small cells

    >2 Deep Plastic Division Bd Feeder
    Not my favorite feeders. They drown a lot of bees... you can just convert a solid bottom board to a feeder and save the cost.

    >2 Frame select assembled Medium DT Super
    I'd just get more eight frame boxes...

    >20 Assembled 6 1/4 white super frame (ea)
    I'd get more PF120s...

    >2 10-Frame Plastic Queen Excluder
    I rarely have any use for an excluder, and I have no use for a plastic one. I'd save your money and skip it.

    >2 10-Frame Entrance Reducer
    Reducers are easy enough to cut out of a one by two and make them however you like. But actually I like #8 hardware cloth for my reducer as it gives better ventilation, better robber protection and doesn't cost much...

    >Smoke Stack Smoker
    Not sure what size that is, but I'd get the large one. The larger ones are easier to keep lit.

    >Hive Pry Tool
    I love my Italian hive tool.. gave away the rest of them...

    >Hood
    I'd get a jacket with hood. Preferably a ventilated jacket with hood...

    >Gloves
    Now that you have the jacket, just buy some regular buckskin leather gloves and tuck them into the elastic on the sleeves of the jacket. Easier to get on and off, cheaper and cooler.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Mirabel, Québec, Canada
    Posts
    423

    Default Re: Am I on the right track?

    My plan was originally to go all deeps, but after having tried it... I'm having a change of heart. Sure, it's nice to have one-size-fits-all frames, but even when only half-full with honey, the rest with brood, these things were HEAVY. I could lift them, but I doubt my back would love me when I'd get older, and usually people helping me could not lift them. I'm seriously considering shallows, now. Deeps with black plastic foundation for the brood, and shallow foundationless for comb honey.
    www.apisrustica.com (French-only website) Bee Breeding: Canadian nuclei & queens / northern hygienic bees

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Winchester,Tn
    Posts
    16

    Default Re: Am I on the right track?

    Excellent, Michael...
    The correct kind of HELP.
    Wish I had found a nuc supplier with wintered medium nucs. Even 2 storied.
    Thanks.

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,120

    Default Re: Am I on the right track?

    >Wish I had found a nuc supplier with wintered medium nucs. Even 2 storied

    It's no harder than finding a nuc supplier in the first place... but you could get one eight frame deep box and fill the remainder with medium frames. Many variations on this have been suggested. One of the easiest is to buy a five frame nuc box and cut the top 3" off and use it for a shim to put the deeps in a medium box and fill the gap on the side with a board (one by six 20") and cover the five frame part with another board (one by ten 20") and move the shim up as you add boxes. Eventually pull any of those deeps that are not brood and replace with mediums. Cutout the brood in any remaining combs and tie them into mediums.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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