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Thread: apivar question

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    bryan, texas
    Posts
    194

    Default apivar question

    from what i understand, bees just have to wander around the apivar strips for it to work. Does it have to be a certain temperature for the chemicals to work or does physical contact work? i.e. is it a gas that comes from the strip or is it a contact working chemical?

    reason I'm asking is i just put all my bees on apivar today. Jan 2nd. Almost lost ALL my hives last year because of varroa. Put the strips on right at the start of my flow, and we couldn't get any honey in 2013.

    most of the time in texas, its way above 55 just for some reason this week it's in the 40s.. so just wondering if bees wander around much when its in the 40s

    i know they cluster.. but do they freeze into immobility or do they move around in the ball?

    after i used the apivar last spring, i believe it slowed them down on brooding, but after a month or so after i removed the strips, they rebounded exponentially, which is why I'm trying to see if it would work a bit earlier than normal.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Nelson, South Island, New Zealand
    Posts
    527

    Default Re: apivar question

    Its physical contact that is important. They may not spread it around as much if they are clustered but the strips are in the hive for quite a few weeks and a few cold days shouldnt make too much difference

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Stafford, Virginia
    Posts
    284

    Default Re: apivar question

    right now I am doing a comparison with Apivar and Checkmite down in Florida to see which works better. I have been using Checkmite and Thymol combinations in the past few years with good results. If Apivar is as good as is claimed, I will make the switch. The problem I have with the Apivar Strips is that they are not as easy to place between the frames as Checkmite. The notches are too rigid and sometimes wont stay between the frames. If anyone out there is doing something that makes this easier, please let me know. Thanks.

    Jerry

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Peace River, AB Canada
    Posts
    456

    Default Re: apivar question

    The apivar strip has a hole near the fold out tab so it can be hung using anything similar to a nail or match stick.
    There is enough movement in the cluster but in colder temps you need to make sure the strips are placed so that they will be in the cluster. If the cluster moves away from the strips to cover brood or get nearer to honey stores then you need to move the strips back into the cluster.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Nelson, South Island, New Zealand
    Posts
    527

    Default Re: apivar question

    As JD says there's a hole you can use a toothpick or a nail and hang them between the frames. We never use the tab

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Auckland,Auckland,New Zealand
    Posts
    5,729

    Default Re: apivar question

    Same. If the tab is used the strip tends to bend sideways and the bees eat out part of one of the combs because of that, I put a nail or stick through the hole & the strip hangs straight down.

    The active ingredient, Amitraz, slowly seeps out of the strip and gets on the bees as they brush against the strip. Once out of the strip and on the bees it has a 1/2 life of only a few days before breaking down, so for good results the strips must be within the cluster to have the product circulating in the hive continuously.

    Long as it's done right Apivar is pretty effective it can pull a hive back from the brink of death. As the Amitraz breaks down there is no permanent Amitraz residue left in the hive which is why I personally favour it over the other strip treatments such as Apistan etc. Some of the products the Amitraz breaks down into may be left in the hive but not toxic like the residues of Apistan or similar.
    44 years, been commercial, outfits up to 4000 hives, now 120 hives and 200 nucs as a hobby, selling bees. T (mostly).

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