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  1. #1
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    Aug 2002
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    Default Artificially fertilizing a drone egg

    This topic has come up a couple of times before. I thought this might be interesting. Maybe someone has time to look up the referenced letter in the 1919 journal:

    ABJ April 1920 pg 147
    ARTIFICIAL EGG FERTILIZATION Mr. E.M. Cole of Audubon Iowa recently called my attention to the fact that the artificial impregnation of so called drone eggs as set forth by Gilbert Barratt in the American Bee Journal December 1919 page 415 is not a new idea but that Langstroth reported such a case. The statements referred to appear on the first page of the appendix in the 1914 reprint of the original and on page 41 of Langstroth's third edition. The latter reference reads Dr. Donhoff of Germany in the summer of 1855 reared a worker larva from a drone egg which he had artificially impregnated. Langstroth himself had attempted the same thing in 1852 without success but still held to the opinion that it could be accomplished under favorable circumstances. Apparently this paragraph has been omitted from the recent revisions of Langstroth but now that the subject is receiving considerable attention would it not be desirable to incorporate it in the next revision.--Wallace Park
    The reason why the experiment in question was left out of the Langstroth Dadant revision was that Mr Langstroth had failed and that we feared Donhoff had been mistaken. But the incident was entirely forgotten by me and I thank you for recalling it. It is now too late to incorporate it in the new revision which is just out. But later we may be able to add not only this but also additional facts I do not believe that the eggs which a queen drops involuntarily have ever been cared for by experimenters to ascertain whether they are fertilized or not. If it has been done has the result been invariably the same and what was the sex? These questions have a scientific and perhaps practical importance.--Editor
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Artificially fertilizing a drone egg

    what was the goal??

  3. #3
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    Sacramento,California,USA
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    Default Re: Artificially fertilizing a drone egg

    gmcharlie
    I suspect it was to raise queens from drone eggs in drone cells. This was at the time before Doolittle had perfected the making of wax cups and grafting into them.
    “When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world.” – John Muir

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Artificially fertilizing a drone egg

    Here is a link to a thread about the subject.

    http://www.beesource.com/forums/show...ne-cells/page2

  5. #5

    Default Re: Artificially fertilizing a drone egg

    Quote Originally Posted by gmcharlie View Post
    what was the goal??
    Isn´t it also possible to make diploid drones so? They need to be fed. Was is Woyke?

    1966. Woyke J. Knytel A. Bergandy K.
    The presence of spermatozoa in eggs as proof that drones can develop from
    inseminated eggs of the honeybee.
    J. apic. Res. 5(2): 71-78
    AA 79/1967

    1966. Woyke J. Knytel A. Bergandy K.
    Cytological proof of the origin of drones from inseminated eggs of the honey bee.
    Bul. Acad. pol. Sci. Cl. V. Ser. sci. Biol. 14(1): 65-67
    AA 463L/1967


    http://jerzy_woyke.users.sggw.pl/origpap.htm
    Treatment free, honey production, isolation mated queens, www.saunalahti.fi/lunden/varroakertomus.html

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Hamilton, Alabama
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    1,212

    Default Re: Artificially fertilizing a drone egg

    One reason for fertilizing drone eggs is to have precise control over the drone used for a particular egg. The best I recall, this only works within 2 hours of the drone egg being laid. Put a drone comb in a colony that is ready to raise drones, 2 hours later, remove it and slice it down into strips and mount them on a cell bar. Select drones and extract semen into a pipette, then touch it to the tip of a drone egg where the sperm will enter through the micropyle and fertilize the egg. Give the eggs to a queenless colony and they will raise queens from any that are fertilized.

    It is not a highly reliable way to get queens, success typically is only 20 or 30 percent.
    DarJones - 44 years, 10 colonies (max 40), sideliner, treatment free since 2005, 11 frame broodnest, small cell

  7. #7

    Default Re: Artificially fertilizing a drone egg

    Quote Originally Posted by Fusion_power View Post
    One reason for fertilizing drone eggs is to have precise control over the drone used for a particular egg. The best I recall, this only works within 2 hours of the drone egg being laid. Put a drone comb in a colony that is ready to raise drones, 2 hours later, remove it and slice it down into strips and mount them on a cell bar. Select drones and extract semen into a pipette, then touch it to the tip of a drone egg where the sperm will enter through the micropyle and fertilize the egg. Give the eggs to a queenless colony and they will raise queens from any that are fertilized.

    It is not a highly reliable way to get queens, success typically is only 20 or 30 percent.
    Wau, I was slightly recalling spray method. Have you tried or seen that pipette thing working?

    Isn´t it also used to make one type inbreeding, impossible in nature, egg and sperm coming from same individual? The queen must be confined and CO2 gassed to make drone eggs, then these drones are raised and used to fertilize the eggs. (Or to AI the queen, but comes hurry, may not be possible, she is too old then?)

    Woyke made diploid drones just to prove it is possible.
    Treatment free, honey production, isolation mated queens, www.saunalahti.fi/lunden/varroakertomus.html

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
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    Pleasant Shade, TN
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    453

    Default Re: Artificially fertilizing a drone egg

    That is very interesting. I would like to see it done. I would have thought two hours would be too long. Unless I'm mistaken, this would be a wacky way of turning a drone's brother into his father if the egg and drone were from the same colony and laid by the same queen.
    A man is worth just as much as the things about which he busies himself- Marcus Aurelius

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Gainesboro, Tennessee, USA.
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    398

    Default Re: Artificially fertilizing a drone egg

    Interesting but until someone has a breakthrough I guess I don't see any advantages or anything practical about it. Still it is a very neat concept.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
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    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    Default Re: Artificially fertilizing a drone egg

    >I suspect it was to raise queens from drone eggs in drone cells.

    Yes.

    >This was at the time before Doolittle had perfected the making of wax cups and grafting into them.

    No. It was well after (that articale was in 1920. Doolittle's Scientific Queen Rearing was first published in 1889.

    The object was to get controled genetics for the queen. If one raised all ones queens in this fashion one may not have control over the genetics of the workers (as that is related to the drones the queen mated with) but one could control both sides of the equation as far as the genetics off all the queens.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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