Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst ... 456
Results 101 to 111 of 111
  1. #101
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Sacramento, CA, USA
    Posts
    2,974

    Default Re: Pollination of soybeans

    I'm just wondering how to correlate growing soy in Brazil using ahb to US soy varieties, climates, soil conditions and ehb.

  2. #102
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Flora,IL
    Posts
    2,644

    Default Re: Pollination of soybeans

    Betting more of that is cotton than beans. I put hives in beans, but not for honey, for visibility and safety. Yes bees made bean honey this year, BUT I really beleive because it was lack of anything else.

  3. #103
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Sacramento, CA, USA
    Posts
    2,974

    Default Re: Pollination of soybeans

    I jumped ship when soy acreage was thought to be less than almonds..... Also, a bulk of the pollination occurs before the flower even opens in a lot of legumes, if the bloom opens at all. I've worked with varieties the flowers never even open fully which is what I'm betting is why some people see a flow and others do not.

  4. #104
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    New York City, NY
    Posts
    4,317

    Default Re: Pollination of soybeans

    http://cdn.intechopen.com/pdfs/44836...ll_flowers.pdf

    I found this Brazilian study examining Africanized Honeybee pollination of Two varieties of soybeans, one of them RR ready, to be helpful in understanding how far ahead the Brazilians are in this area of research.

  5. #105
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    New York City, NY
    Posts
    4,317

    Default Re: Pollination of soybeans

    Well, U.S. beekeepers have been producing major honey crops from soybeans for a long time.

    So, you really don't need to go 'Africanized' to get the job done.

    I was just pointing out that there's some very serious research currently going on in Brazil regarding soybean pollination by AHB.

    I don't know much about the Brazilian researcher, Chiari, who has been doing these studies, however, I am impressed.

    ----------

    This thread was an offshoot of the 'Industrial Beekeeper' thread.

    When the yields of huge acreages of soybeans can be increased significantly by Honeybee pollination, that's an example of a market that can clearly support migratory pollination on an industrial scale.

    I'm just pointing out the obvious.

    It's not the current SOP though.

  6. #106
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Chardon, Ohio
    Posts
    91

    Default Re: Pollination of soybeans

    Quote Originally Posted by WLC View Post
    http://cdn.intechopen.com/pdfs/44836...ll_flowers.pdf

    I found this Brazilian study examining Africanized Honeybee pollination of Two varieties of soybeans, one of them RR ready, to be helpful in understanding how far ahead the Brazilians are in this area of research.
    You quote a meaningless study that involved caged 24 square meter areas of beans. There have been lots and lots and lots of US based studies on soybean pollination by honey bees, both caged and open. These studies go back 40 years or more. Caged studies have clearly been shown to be 100% meaningless in terms of the real world. As a beekeeper are you going to cage my 100 acre field of cleistogamous soybeans? And are you going to provide one colony per 24 square meters? Are you going to do this at a cost of say $20 per acre for a four week period plus 25% of the value of any yield enhancement over five bushels per acre? Value to be established based on the Chicago Board of Trade commodity price for beans on the day of harvest and yield of surrounding non pollinated fields. And by the way, I may need to spray roundup during pollination. I will give you 48 hour notice to take whatever steps you think you need to take to protect your bees from the spray. Rest assured, if I need to spray I am going to spray as some weeds are well proven to kill bean yield due to allelopathic actions. It will be in the contract. By the way that 100 acre field is over a mile and a half from the closest open water supply during soybean bloom. How are caged bees going to get water? Are you going to provide water for your bees daily? My beans are in Iowa and do not bear nectar. Not hot enough to bear nectar almost every day. Are you going to feed HFC to keep your colonies alive? Or do they come with a full deep of honey on them?

    <snip for civility> you could have bothered to look up the US studies. They are dirt easy to find.

    All open field studies show the same thing. Occasionally a minor yield improvement can be observed with large numbers of hives on soybeans. This has been shown to be due nearly 100% to improved self pollination and next to zero cross pollination in well controlled studies. The Brazilians are simply replowing old infertile ground to pump up their paper count in the literature. Lump it right in there with cold fusion and polywater. As a farmer I will not grow a crop that needs insect pollination and only produces a gross income per acre of perhaps $750 when prices of the commodity are unusually high. Land around my farm sells for as much as $8000 an acre now. I need a return on my investment.

    By the way, the closest paved road to my farm is several miles. And all we have are dirt two tracks going from the road back to the fields. I doubt if any sane semi driver is going to take his truck down those two tracks. But I am sure you can rent a local driver, tractor and open hay rack to move your hives and caging materials from the truck to the fields and back from the fields to the truck at the end of pollination. I will bill you for any crop destroyed in the course of installation or removal.
    Last edited by JohnK and Sheri; 12-26-2013 at 10:58 AM.

  7. #107
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    New York City, NY
    Posts
    4,317

    Default Re: Pollination of soybeans

    Richard:

    (I've got my degrees and LLC binder + ledger in view.)

    There certainly are current U.S. studies showing increased soybean yields by Honeybee pollination (Milfont, 2013).

    I've also seen the Erickson studies, though they're somewhat dated.

    As I've noted, the Chiari studies from Brazil are interesting in their details.

    I've also taken the time to look over 'Mississippi Soybean Variety Trials, 2012'.

    I thought that Honeybee pollination could not only help increase yields in the lagging operations, but that they might just help some of the more productive operations break the 100 bu/acre barrier.

    There's no information on proximity to existing Honeybee operations though.
    Last edited by JohnK and Sheri; 12-26-2013 at 11:12 AM.

  8. #108
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    groveton tx
    Posts
    149

    Default Re: Pollination of soybeans

    If the seed companies had varieties that produced nectar every year they would be heros to most beekeepers. We don't need to charge pollination fees. That's crazy. But if you could make a box or 2 of honey every year in the over farmed areas wouldn't that be awesome!

  9. #109
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    New York City, NY
    Posts
    4,317

    Default Re: Pollination of soybeans

    Quote Originally Posted by babybee View Post
    If the seed companies had varieties that produced nectar every year they would be heros to most beekeepers. We don't need to charge pollination fees. That's crazy. But if you could make a box or 2 of honey every year in the over farmed areas wouldn't that be awesome!
    That's the right way to think about it.

    As long as both you and the soybean farmer benefit from the relationship, then it can start growing into a huge pollination market for beekeepers.

    It's really just a matter of applying all of the research that shows that Honeybees not only increase soybeans yields (on certain varieties, under certain conditions), but that those colonies also become more productive themselves.

    It should be a Win/Win relationship.

    The Honeybee/soybean markets that are the first to do this on a large scale get a big competitive advantage as well.

  10. #110
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    New York City, NY
    Posts
    4,317

    Default Re: Pollination of soybeans

    Ooops.

    Substitute Palmer, 2010 or Ray, 2010 as you wish.

    I'm not going back to do editing since I've already made my points: research has shown that Honeybees can increase soybean yields, and beekeepers have reported soybean honey crops (productivity).

    (read the rest of it anyway)

    Since you've mentioned Brazil...

    Soybean futures are at $10 a bushel largely because of projected increased soybean production in Brazil.

    So, not only is Brazil increasing it's production, and driving down prices, it's also doing most of the research for increasing soybean yields via Honeybee pollination.

    The U.S. does have the advantage of increased soybean production in the South, which also happens to be a major Honeybee producing region.

    Furthermore, U.S. beekeepers already have much of the needed logistical support in place as a result of California almond pollination.

    I doubt that Brazil has anything like the migratory pollinators that we have here.

    Finally, I'm not sure, but I think that a lot of that equipment is pretty much available anyway right around the time that soybeans start to flower (R1). That should coincide with the summer dearth as well.
    Last edited by WLC; 12-25-2013 at 01:27 PM.

  11. #111

    Default Re: Pollination of soybeans

    Bees go Hungary in Ga. Sitting on beans. No honey to be made no matter what color the bloom is. Would be nice if they developed one that did produce and be planted in ga.

Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst ... 456

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads