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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Fort Walton Beach, Florida
    Posts
    1,191

    Default Re: Another disadvantage with Foundationless

    Quote Originally Posted by odfrank View Post
    >
    How much time are you saving? The same goes for mono-filament line IMHO. What is the savings and benefit over the proven method of using wires?
    For foundationless, I think the advantage of heavy monofilament is that its diameter is so much greater than wire, so that it is less likely to cut the comb when the comb is soft. Plus it's faster to install than wire, the way I do it.
    Ray--1 year, 7 hives, TF

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Reno, NV
    Posts
    2,610

    Default Re: Another disadvantage with Foundationless

    I tried using monofilament but the bees chewed it out of the comb in less than a year. Never tried wire. I plan on using the skewers. I used small diameter dowel in my top bar for the first ten bars or so. it has worked well. one dowel has gotten broken off and it tends to casue the bees to mis direct the comb as they draw it so I did not put it on the rest of the bars. The comb has since been corrected.
    Stand for what you believe, even if you stand alone.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,492

    Default Re: Another disadvantage with Foundationless

    >has anyone else tried it?

    I've done a dowel but not the skewers. I don't think it's much different.

    >For foundationless, I think the advantage of heavy monofilament is that its diameter is so much greater than wire, so that it is less likely to cut the comb when the comb is soft.

    Wire needs to be crimped. Then it disperses the stress over a larger area and in different directions.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Santa Monica, CA, USA
    Posts
    1,449

    Default Re: Another disadvantage with Foundationless

    All my bars in medium-size category have no additional support. Bars for deep-size box needed some side support.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Серёжа, Sergey

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    jackson county, alabama, usa
    Posts
    4,042

    Default Re: Another disadvantage with Foundationless

    nice pics sergey! that honey looks good enough to eat!
    beekeeping since june 2010, +/- 20 hives, tf

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Santa Monica, CA, USA
    Posts
    1,449

    Default Re: Another disadvantage with Foundationless

    O, thank you! My bees are working very hard even in winter. Honey from those frames were extracted on Christmas day, thus - it is "Christmas honey"!
    Серёжа, Sergey

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    jackson county, alabama, usa
    Posts
    4,042

    Default Re: Another disadvantage with Foundationless

    good work and congratulations. i know how special it is to enjoy your own honey!
    beekeeping since june 2010, +/- 20 hives, tf

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX, USA
    Posts
    1,727

    Default Re: Another disadvantage with Foundationless

    I use 20 lb fishing line, bees haven't chewed through it.
    Time to be a gypsy again, 2014 will be my prep year, my bees want a better area with actual rainfall.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Campbell, Wyoming USA
    Posts
    418

    Default Re: Another disadvantage with Foundationless

    I have a lot of deep frames that I have that are foundationless, that wax looks pretty white odfrank, and I noticed it's not attached on the sides. I have had some break out like that, and the majority of the ones that do are not attached. I don't run foundationless in my supers just in my brood boxes. I have noticed the ones in the brood boxes that get a little bit of age to them have quite a bit more rigidity; however, I do have some that will crack throughout the entire comb but not fall out (these bloody Wyoming winters will reek havoc on them, maybe the expansion and contraction of a -20F night followed by a 40F high the next day?) but as long as they don't fall out the bees will patch them up in the spring. I do really like having the BB's foundationless so I'm in the process of moving all of my rite-cell into my supers and all of my BB's foundationless, it's been about a two year process for fifty colonies, pleased with the results so far.
    We the willing have done so much with so little for so long we can now do anything with nothing

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