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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Alachua County, FL, USA
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    6,787

    Default Genetic Variability of the Neogregarine Apicystis bombi, an Etiological Agent

    Genetic Variability of the Neogregarine Apicystis bombi, an Etiological Agent of an Emergent Bumblebee Disease
    The worldwide spread of diseases is considered a major threat to biodiversity and a possible driver of the decline of pollinator populations, particularly when novel species or strains of parasites emerge. Previous studies have suggested that populations of introduced European honeybee (Apis mellifera) and bumblebee species (Bombus terrestris and Bombus ruderatus) in Argentina share the neogregarine parasite Apicystis bombi with the native bumblebee (Bombus dahlbomii). In this study we investigated whether A. bombi is acting as an emergent parasite in the non-native populations. Specifically, we asked whether A. bombi, recently identified in Argentina, was introduced by European, non-native bees. Using ITS1 and ITS2 to assess the parasite’s intraspecific genetic variation in bees from Argentina and Europe, we found a largely unstructured parasite population, with only 15% of the genetic variation being explained by geographic location. The most abundant haplotype in Argentina (found in all 9 specimens of non-native species) was identical to the most abundant haplotype in Europe (found in 6 out of 8 specimens). Similarly, there was no evidence of structuring by host species, with this factor explaining only 17% of the genetic variation. Interestingly, parasites in native Bombus ephippiatus from Mexico were genetically distant from the Argentine and European samples, suggesting that sufficient variability does exist in the ITS region to identify continent-level genetic structure in the parasite. Thus, the data suggest that A. bombi from Argentina and Europe share a common, relatively recent origin. Although our data did not provide information on the direction of transfer, the absence of genetic structure across space and host species suggests that A. bombi may be acting as an emergent infectious disease across bee taxa and continents.
    http://www.plosone.org/article/info%...l.pone.0081475
    americasbeekeeper.com
    beekeeper@americasbeekeeper.com

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Pleasant Shade, TN
    Posts
    439

    Default Re: Genetic Variability of the Neogregarine Apicystis bombi, an Etiological Agent

    Is there any info on whether the parasite is endemic to the New Zealand population? I didn't find any info about that in this article, granted, I read quickly. If it is not, it may suggest that the disease was dormant in South America and did not infect bumble bees until the terrastrus species of bubble bee was introduced. Terrastrus may have played as a "mutational ladder".That would also explain the genetic difference in the parasite found in the Mexico populations.
    Like I said though, that info may have been there, but I didn't see it. I also wish I took more advanced genetics classes in college. The whole field of study is interesting to me. Thanks for posting.


    truts
    A man is worth just as much as the things about which he busies himself- Marcus Aurelius

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