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Thread: Recovering Bees

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Palm beach Florida USA
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    152

    Default Recovering Bees

    Heres a link to all the pictures. my wife took 2 of every frame front and back except one. the bees got a little to close and she went in. they seem fine to me and they are back to being a little mean
    they are going out again and bringing in pollen.What ever it was seems to of passed. If you see anything let me know
    http://www.beesource.com/forums/show...248-Dying-Bees original post about these bees

    http://s230.photobucket.com/user/Gen...c42f4.jpg.html


    Gene
    Last edited by Genemiller; 12-07-2013 at 09:12 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    hinesville ga usa
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    343

    Default Re: Recovering Bees

    good looking hive, is that foundationless comb,?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    St. Albans, Vermont
    Posts
    5,373

    Default Re: Recovering Bees

    Don't let them run out of feed.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Davie, Florida, USA
    Posts
    825

    Default Re: Recovering Bees

    Hi Gene....Great job! Did you see new larvae? I tried to zoom in on the pics, but it got too fuzzy to tell.

    I snagged this off of the web, not my photo, but did you see anything that looks like these cells?

    http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=...ed=0CEAQ9QEwCA

    I saw capped brood, which would be a couple weeks old. Also, as empty as the bottom of your frames appear to be, I am still suspecting a robbing event that your colony successfully defended off. I will be interested to see others opinions.

    You might want to edit your post to include a link to your thread with the videos you posted so everyone has the full event leading into this.... just a thought.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Sacramento, CA, USA
    Posts
    2,841

    Default Re: Recovering Bees

    Is this the hive that had some dying bees earlier?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Jefferson Co, TX
    Posts
    637

    Default Re: Recovering Bees

    Like that exposed comb under the eaves. Were you able to save much of it?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Palm beach Florida USA
    Posts
    152

    Default Re: Recovering Bees

    Yes this is the same hive that was dying earlier and they are on foundationless. there are plenty of rice sized larva and every frame has some nectar and capped honey. some of the pristine comb at the bottom of those frames is new. 2 of the frames have been completely filled out in just the last month. i really have no idea how much food bees need but if they are bring in pollen then shouldn't that suffice? remember things here are different then the rest of the country, technically this is our flow. i only have residential for my source but we have plenty of flowers. I'm in zone 10B if that helps. My wife was nervous when taking the pictures because the bees were really flying. She usually takes clearer pictures. i haven't been smoking them because they were hardly flying but today they seemed their old selves, just less bees. Here is what they are bringing in.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    KC, MO, USA
    Posts
    1,168

    Default Re: Recovering Bees

    Some of your frames look a little spotty, might just be they are recovering and she has started laying again, But I would keep an eye on it.
    Looks like you have some stores, I would feed and give pollen patties.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Rader, Greene County, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    6,096

    Default Re: Recovering Bees

    > I really have no idea how much food bees need but if they are bring in pollen then shouldn't that suffice?

    Pollen and nectar are not interchangeable bee food. Pollen is primarily protein, and nectar is primarily carbohydrates. Older bees mostly consume carbohydrates (nectar). Nurse bees need protein to be able to produce royal jelly to feed brood and the queen.
    Graham
    USDA Zone 7A Elevation 1400 ft

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Palm beach Florida USA
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    152

    Default Re: Recovering Bees

    Quote Originally Posted by Rader Sidetrack View Post
    > I really have no idea how much food bees need but if they are bring in pollen then shouldn't that suffice?

    Pollen and nectar are not interchangeable bee food. Pollen is primarily protein, and nectar is primarily carbohydrates. Older bees mostly consume carbohydrates (nectar). Nurse bees need protein to be able to produce royal jelly to feed brood and the queen.
    They are bringing in large amounts of pollen and they have stores on every frame. I didn't get to watch them today but I will tomorrow. How long before the pollen becomes royal jelly.

    Gene

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Rader, Greene County, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    6,096

    Default Re: Recovering Bees

    > How long before the pollen becomes royal jelly.

    Bees make "bee bread" with pollen and store it in comb cells for future use. But royal jelly is secreted from a gland on nurse bees heads, and used directly. Those nurse bees need to eat pollen (or bee bread, presumably) to be able to have their bodies manufacture that royal jelly.

    I suggest that you take some time and work your way through this document for a better explanation of how this all works:
    http://www.beeccdcap.uga.edu/documen...Article10.html
    Graham
    USDA Zone 7A Elevation 1400 ft

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