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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Giles, Virginia, USA
    Posts
    31

    Default Video- Feeding some wild honey bees

    It was a warm day the other day and a lone honey bee came flying around me while I was outside on the deck. I went inside and quickly mixed up a small bit of sugar water and came out and poured it on some saran wrap and laid it on the deck banister. She eventually found it and would leave and come back for it. I thought she'd bring some friends but only ever saw one bee visiting at a time. So I made up a pan of sugar syrup and set it out for her. She found it too, and the next day she brought back some friends. We'll see how many more show up tomorrow. Here's a couple of vids though. I had to improve the raft as you can see in the second video. They kept falling into the syrup and I had to keep rescuing them. Enjoy

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gg753Pjm-Hw
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MkxU7_DlTgk

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Giles, Virginia, USA
    Posts
    31

    Default Re: Video- Feeding some wild honey bees

    Update on the wild bees- TONS showed up today. I had to move them away from the deck because it was like bee bonanza out there. Took them some time to figure out where I moved it to and several kept showing up on the deck. Supposed to have rain moving in tonight and turning cold.. so might not see the girls again this year. Hopefully I helped them boost some of their stores a bit. I enjoyed watching them at least.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3iBbQAyxfks

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Tipton, TN, USA
    Posts
    784

    Default Re: Video- Feeding some wild honey bees

    That's funny.... You should see it, when you have a real bonanza... You wouldn't be able to see that plate for all the bees... On the plus side, you could catch a bunch of them and try beelining to located the hive... =)

    Or sprinkle a little flour on a couple and see how long it takes for them to come back..
    Solo for the last 4 Years, ~60 Hives, TF + Oils.
    http://tradingwebsites4bees.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Giles, Virginia, USA
    Posts
    31

    Default Re: Video- Feeding some wild honey bees

    Kevin- yea I'm sure if the weather holds out a few more days it'll be even crazier- or imagine at springtime- which I'll put out some again and see what I can get. I did think of the bee-lining and tried to get an idea of which way they were flying. But, I'm afraid they're heading towards some property that may be posted. I didn't think of the flour idea! If the weather is nice tomorrow and they're feeding then I'll give a few of them a sprinkle- thanks for the ideas!
    Last edited by StonyCreekBees; 12-05-2013 at 05:57 PM. Reason: typo

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Tipton, TN, USA
    Posts
    784

    Default Re: Video- Feeding some wild honey bees

    You'd have to look it up.. but I think they fly at around 35 miles per hour... If you time it from when they leave to coming back, you should get a rough idea on how far away they are from you...
    Solo for the last 4 Years, ~60 Hives, TF + Oils.
    http://tradingwebsites4bees.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Giles, Virginia, USA
    Posts
    31

    Default Re: Video- Feeding some wild honey bees

    Update- so on the warm days we've been having I've made up some more sugar syrup and the bees have been coming to feed on it like crazy. I watched them closely and caught the general direction they were leaving to. And after a bit of a hike down a hill and up another steep rocky hill I spotted a hole in a tree about 30-50 feet up (I'm not great on judging distance/height).. I thought I saw some flying around the hole but wasn't certain. After hiking back home and picking up some binoculars and hiking back to the tree- I've confirmed that the bees are feral. I see some bees leaving in another direction from the feeder (and some bees are a lot darker - almost black- than the majority). So I think there's a couple of hives close by (whether the other one is feral or a managed colony.. idk). But I'm glad to have a feral colony so close to my house. I'm hoping I'll be able to set up a bait hive and catch a swarm off of these bees next season. The bees look great. I've not seen any mites on the bees visiting the feeders- but I'm not sure if mites typically latch onto foragers since they prefer staying near the cells and on nurse bees. But, I'm glad to see that this feral colony has survived the worse of our winter here. Though we're not out of the woods yet- we've been known to get snow and cold weather up until April. I'd really like to get a swarm off of these bees if they manage to survive til next season when I plan to start beekeeping.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Pima County, AZ, USA
    Posts
    7

    Default Re: Video- Feeding some wild honey bees

    I am curious about feeding the wild bees that visit my hummingbird feeders. I make hummingbird nectar anywhere from 1:3 to 1:5 (ratio of white sugar to water). Should I make the bee nectar stronger, say 1:1? Should I place it in an open pan?

    I live in a very hot climate, Sonoran Desert of southern AZ. I have to change the hummingbird nectar every other day in the summer. I assume I should replace/refill the "bee feeder" every other day also?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Pima County, AZ, USA
    Posts
    7

    Default Re: Video- Feeding some wild honey bees

    Sorry, I asked too soon. Never mind. I found this info: http://www.apishive.com/honey-bee-he...our-honey-bees

    Spring: March-April-May
    1:2 This formula is a very light syrup, it is made using one part of sugar to two parts of
    water. For example, 1 pound sugar to 2 pounds of water. It is used in late winter and early
    spring to stimulate the queen to lay eggs and helps the bees draw more comb.

    Summer June-July-August
    1:1 this formula is a medium weight syrup, it is made using one part of sugar to one part
    of water. For example, 1 pound of sugar to 1 pound of water. It is used as an artificial nectar
    to feed brood larvae in spring and summer or to get the bees to draw more comb.

    Fall Sept-Oct-Nov
    2:1 this formula is a very heavy syrup, it is made using two parts of sugar to one part of
    water. For example, 2 pound of sugar to 1 pound of water. This is used in fall or early winter as
    a honey substitute to feed your bees. The bees should add weight and will use these stores throughout winter. Ideal weight for a typical Rocky Mt. winter bee hive is about 120-140 pounds.

    Making the syrup: All three sryups are simple to make. Sometimes we call them simple syrups. Bring proper weight of water to a boil then reduce heat to low. Add proper weight of sugar and stir until dissolved. Never cook your sugar. In fact suggesting boiling is a bad idea. Just get all the sugar dissolved with non on the bottom. Let cool and then feed. If you your adding a feeding stimulant or essential oils add proper amount as suggested on bottle, mix well and watch your bees enjoy.

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