Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 41 to 60 of 80
  1. #41
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Santa Clara, California, USA
    Posts
    45

    Default Re: Home made frames

    I herd of people jut buying the tops and bottoms from Dadant or Mann Lake. They make their own ends that are wider so that when you put 9 in a 10 frame box they are all perfectly spaces and almost a tight fit. This maybe the cheapest way to have them made.

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Tipton, TN, USA
    Posts
    774

    Default Re: Home made frames

    If you make the end bars thinner, you should shave the top bar also... At least you need to measure the gap and make sure that it's still 1/4"-3/8"...

    Frankly, unless you are going to make a bunch... I don't know if the 72 cents per is worth the effort... Now, once your going to make a couple thousand, build all the jigs/fixtures. It probably becomes worth effort...

    I.e. buddy of mine would cut a 2x6 down to the length of a medium/deep frame. Then he'd run it on a shaper to get the hoffman space on the sides... Then he just sliced it 3/8" with a fixture, similar to cutting bread/sandwich meat..

    I'm probably going to do something similar, but I need to look and see if that is the best way to do it. It might be easier/cheaper to set up a dedicated table saw with a vertical tenon slide and then another with a 45 degree cut for the side. It doesn't take much time adjusting machines and moving jigs around to offset the price of having a dedicated machine, assuming you have the space.. (100 dollar special at harbor freight... 500 frames and it should be paid for..))

    Need Santa to bring me a bandsaw...
    Solo for the last 4 Years, ~60 Hives, TF + Oils.
    http://tradingwebsites4bees.com

  3. #43
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Whitla Ab. Canada
    Posts
    271

    Default Re: Home made frames

    Quote Originally Posted by KevinR View Post
    Looks like it works, but not a very strong designed frame... Overall the techniques appear to be close to what you'd do, but I don't think I would "eyeball" the center lines. It appears that he's 1/8" or more off center.
    I put a dab of glue on my joints and use 3/4 inch long 1/4 inch crown staples instead of brad nails, it really makes them solid. I noticed too that he was off center but that was fixed by measuring correctly. My frames are foundation-less but I still make the saw cut in the top bar to hold Popsicle sticks.
    A Bank is a place where they lend you an umbrella in fair weather and ask for it back when it rains.- Robert Frost

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Tipton, TN, USA
    Posts
    774

    Default Re: Home made frames

    The top/bottom dado on the end bars add quite a bit of strength to the frame when glued in place. At almost 3 times the surface area for glue. I doubt the manufacturers would go through the trouble if if it didn't work out.

    With said, I doubt these frames will fall apart, but I've had some that still separated when glued/stapled from the top and side.. If I was going through the effort, I'd do everything possible to do it one time.

    But if you don't have the tools, all you need is a 1.25" wide bar on the top. *grins*
    Solo for the last 4 Years, ~60 Hives, TF + Oils.
    http://tradingwebsites4bees.com

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Victoria, Australia
    Posts
    657

    Default Re: Home made frames

    I've also thought of gluing two 8mm(5/16") strips on a 19mm(3/4") board to make the width for the end bars 35mm (1-3/8"), but the blade on my table saw doesn't quite make the height needed. So haven't tried it yet.

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    5,032

    Default Re: Homemade frames

    Previous post of mine, mentioning frame making -> Link.

    The best tool I have for creating accurate frame components, quickly, is my band saw with a carbide toothed blade. I highly recommend that anyone with a band saw, or planning to acquire a band saw, give serious consideration to also obtaining and using a carbide toothed band saw blade.

    I use the band saw to cut segments of lumber into blanks, then use the table saw with dado blade to cut all rabbet cuts, then once the blanks are ready, they can be quickly cut into individual parts, like End Bars or Top Bars, using the band saw.
    Last edited by Joseph Clemens; 12-09-2013 at 05:09 PM.
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,196

    Default Re: Home made frames

    What width and tooth pattern are you using? What size bandsaw as well? I have a 10" Rockwell that I need to get a new blade for.

    http://lumberjocks.com/assets/pictur...68783-438x.jpg
    Regards, Barry

  8. #48
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Algoma dr. Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    561

    Default Re: Home made frames

    The smaller wheeled bandsaws do not get good blade life. Sometimes not all that smooth a cut and if you happen to dull one side the cut runs off. Unless you get something with a fairly good size to it they are not that fast. They will rip wider stock than most table saws though. I have cut quite a bit of wood for strip boat construction and I found the circular saw gave better finish and the band saw was not worth the little bit of savings in the kerf loss.

  9. #49
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    5,032

    Default Re: Homemade frames

    My band saw is the cheapest one I could find, a $99 Craftsman - 10", with a blade 70-1/2" long. It worked well, but the blades would always dull quickly. I had the thought that a carbide toothed blade would be better, but it was more than a year before I could fit one into my budget. Now that I have one, it has increased the performance of my band saw, incredibly. Amazingly accurate, with smooth cuts and much more quickly.

    The blade I got is one with one tooth beveled in from one side, then one that is straight/flat, with the next beveled in from the opposite side. I'm not sure what that's called, but I believe it is a standard for this type of blade.

    See this link.
    Last edited by Joseph Clemens; 12-09-2013 at 05:08 PM.
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

  10. #50
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Algoma dr. Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    561

    Default Re: Home made frames

    Joseph, how wide is the kerf compared to a non insert tooth band? The problem I had with my small wheeled saw was gullet cracking (and breaking) from bending around the smaller wheels. Re the dulling; A lot of bands have the teeth sheared all from one side then sharpened and set. The bend memory of the tooth is different side to side and they tend to run off to one side. It is a fair chore to refile and set properly.

  11. #51
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Tipton, TN, USA
    Posts
    774

    Default Re: Home made frames

    100 dollar saw, with a 100 dollar blade... oh the Irony... *grins*

    I agree that quality blades/bits make a difference on tools... Hurts my feelings everything I break a carbide endmill. *sniffs*

    Looks like a .050" kerf on that bandsaw compared to a 5/16th (0.3125) or so that I think my tablesaw blades are.

    Guess it depends on how wide the piece you are slicing from on whether it makes much of a difference... But over time, I expect the tablesaw sawdust pile to be significantly bigger.
    Solo for the last 4 Years, ~60 Hives, TF + Oils.
    http://tradingwebsites4bees.com

  12. #52
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    5,032

    Default Re: Homemade frames

    Yes, as KevinR said, .050" kerf. Also, I got the 1/2" wide blade -vs- 3/8", so I could mount it where the carbide teeth were plenty proud of the bearings, so the carbide teeth would only contact the wood I was cutting and not destroy the bearings or the teeth. The carbide has already endured a year of work, and I'm using it much more than I ever used the typical all-steel blades. It shows no signs of the teeth becoming dull or stress fractures forming on the backing metal. And my shop is not heated or cooled, experiencing all the temperature swings our desert climate provides.

    When using the all-steel blades, they were, as you say, notorious for wandering and not cutting true, despite my best efforts. Now, with the carbide toothed blades, that is a very rare occurrence.
    Last edited by Joseph Clemens; 12-09-2013 at 05:08 PM.
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

  13. #53
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    5,032

    Default Re: Homemade frames

    Why I brought up the band saw and carbide toothed band saw blades in this thread.

    I had attempted to create homemade frames before I obtained the carbide toothed blade, but only managed to create a few, it was very time consuming, and they were very sad specimens, indeed. Since I obtained the carbide toothed blade, it has been much easier to make the cuts for frame components and I no longer consider homemade frame creation impractical. The materials cost much less than commercial frames, though the tools and manpower costs, likely bring the total costs of my homemade frames way above what it would cost me to purchase them, I custom design them to suit myself, so making them myself is the only option I have for frames that incorporate my own designs.

    Last edited by Joseph Clemens; 12-09-2013 at 05:07 PM.
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

  14. #54
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Algoma dr. Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    561

    Default Re: Home made frames

    Joseph they certainly look very nice. Do you find that ridge detail on the bottom bars leads to the comb being better attached? I built that into some of my top bars but have flat bottoms and they do not get built onto, or at least not in the first drawout!
    Attached Images Attached Images

  15. #55
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    5,032

    Default Re: Homemade frames

    Sometimes they attach the bottoms of combs more quickly to those with the matching bottom comb guides, and sometimes they don't. This coming season I am going to try paying more attention, to determine, for myself, if the bottom guides are truly worth the effort.

    Last edited by Joseph Clemens; 12-10-2013 at 12:50 AM.
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

  16. #56
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Richland Iowa USA
    Posts
    148

    Default Re: Homemade frames

    I was told to rub wax on the bottom and sides and that it would help... I was also told that on each inspection I should rotate the combs.. placing a new one at the bottom side, moving them all over one, the end one up and over etc... this way the combs are slowly moved through the center of the hive where they are primary and will get attached quickly.. I cant testify to the effectiveness of rubbing wax, but I can say the SLOW rotation does seem to help... IF there is no flow I rotate the top comb down to the bottom side so I dont end up with empty frames.. if there is a flow they will quickly fill the single empty frame...

    I dont use bottom guides but would be interested in knowing if they help!!!

    www.brokencrayoncrafts.com 6 yrs aiding 40+ hives 2 yrs personal. 17 hives (T, TF Goal) Zone 5a

  17. #57
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Tipton, TN, USA
    Posts
    774

    Default Re: Homemade frames

    Quote Originally Posted by SS1 View Post
    I dont use bottom guides but would be interested in knowing if they help!!!
    What do you mean by bottom guides?

    I usually just rotate my comb if they are slow to draw out the comb. I just checkerboard it between two well drawn brood combs. If you put it between honey combs, sometimes the ladies will draw the existing comb out and ignore the foundation.. So you end up with really fat honey combs and little sad partially drawn out combs..
    Solo for the last 4 Years, ~60 Hives, TF + Oils.
    http://tradingwebsites4bees.com

  18. #58
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Menomonee Falls, Wis.
    Posts
    2,464

    Default Re: Home made frames

    Mr. Clemons - I have no doubt you have good luck with your carbide blades, but have you ever tried a blade from Starrett? We used a 9' , 3/4 wide, .032" think, 3 teeth to the inch blade in a 1930's Wallace band saw, and where quite pleased. We where ripping 2*6 the tall way to make 3-3/8" pieces, and where impressed with how straight it cut.

    Crazy Roland

  19. #59
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,196

    Default Re: Home made frames

    What size bandsaw?
    Regards, Barry

  20. #60
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    5,032

    Default Re: Home made frames

    KevinR, If you look at my pics in posts 53 and 55, it shows my foundationless frame design, and frames with comb guides on both the undersides of the Top Bars and upper sides of the Bottom Bars, mostly in attempts to get foundationless combs attached to the Bottom Bars more quickly and readily. In honey supers the bees often seem to prefer deepening cells vs building new comb, to the annoyance of their keepers. Though give them empty space between brood combs and they usually do work that is more appreciated.

    Roland, I have not yet tried blades by Starrett, but I shall look them up, and if my budget allows, I will probably give them a try. Thanks for the info.


    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads