My recipe/method for sugar blocks
Page 1 of 6 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 441

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Roy, Wa
    Posts
    2,860

    Default My recipe/method for sugar blocks

    I ran across these photos and thought I'd post them again.
    I put a sugar block on every hive that is in a single or when the cluster is near the top of the hive.

    25# cane sugar
    one quart cider vinegar
    sprinkle of electrolytes
    1-2 T citric acid (Found in your canning dept)
    splash of pro Health or other scented essential oil of choice

    Mix together about 1/3 of the sugar and vinegar at a time in a five gallon bucket with a large drill and paint paddle mixer. If you try to mix it all at once, you will get uneven moisture distributation.
    Mixture will feel very soft, but not wet or sticky.
    I use a shallow aluminum baking sheet that fits right into my Cabelas food dehydrator. You can use any size pan you want, but be sure your bricks are no taller than your frame extension under your inner cover.
    Here I sprinkled some dry Beepro on the bottom of the pan.Don't do it, it just gets gummy. Sugar will not stick to the pan after it has dried.
    Fill the pan to desired depth with moistened sugar mix:



    Roll out and lightly compress in the pan:



    NOW sprinkle with Beepro or other protein mix if desired. I don't want to force them to eat protein if they don't want to, especially if they can't get out for cleansing flights regularly:



    Be SURE to cut the sugar into block sized before it hardens. You'll never do it after it's hard. It takes about 2 weeks sitting out in the unheated greenhouse to harden.

    But will set up and harden in 1-2 days in the food dehydrator at about 130 degrees:



    You can also let it sit several hours in your oven on low temp

    Here is the brand of electrolytes and vitamins I've been using for two years with excellent results:



    I bought it online at ValleyVet.com (I use about 1/2 tsp per 25# sugar)

    Here is the application and overwintering results.
    Heer is a double nuc with a large volume of bees.



    You can see the sugar block is almost gone. This photo is late winter 2012:



    Even hives that are heavy will still consume this block. I was surprised they would do so, but it didn't worry me they would reserve their natural stores for spring when they started raising brood. And that is exactly what they did.

    Here is a photo of a hive that was just bursting at the seams in a single deep late summer. In Sept. Relucently, I threw on an undrawn shallow and left for hunting for 2 weeks. I was surprised to see by the time I got back they had drawn and filled the center of the frames. So now..dummy..I thought, now they get to go through the winter with empty new frames on the outside. DOH! Here is another good example of feed directly above the cluster. Although the bottom deep was packed and heavy, they still seemed to appreciate the sugar.



    All the hives I put sugar blocks on treated them the same they consumed the middle of the block first, directly above the cluster. The condensation from the cluster forms syrup droplets on the brick. Easy for them to take up. Every hive I had, when checked in late winter has open syrup in cells near the brood nest. With no flow that time of year, I attribute this to the sugar brick.

    Even without experience, I think most people would guess new undrawn frames have no use or insulation value in an overwintering hive. Here is a dorkey video I made to show you, in the event you have drawn frames that are empty available, to fill them with at least something-for R value if nothing else. The sugar recipe is exactly the same for filling drawn comb:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PwC8aEA3FOw

    Here is how they take to the sugar filled comb:



    Feed on the top bars, directly above the cluster is very important. I wouldn't use the frames filled with sugar as a reliable feed source overwinter. But it fills up the empty spaces within the hive. And as you can see, do eventually get to it. This frame is in early spring. Below the sugar is new larva and eggs, then pollen. Actually a nicely worked frame. Did they eat the sugar, or haul it out? I don't know for sure, but saw no evidence of sugar granules on the bottom board or entrance area.
    Compare the photo above to a natural, honey filled frame below. You can see they work a sugar filled frame just like a honey filed frame:



    On a closing note:
    Since beekeeping details are critically local, I'll give you a few more details to consider:

    My bees are all very dark Northern bred with Carniolan genetics in the background. I overwinter in large colonies, which appear to be frugal with their stores. You might not be able to get away with overwintering Italians this way.
    I feed my bees fortified syrup and protein patties during late summer dearth. Large hives heavy with stores get just enough syrup to keep brood rearing somewhat active. Nucs get fed regularly. I go into winter with a lot of young healthy bees and heavy hives.

    My climate, although wet, is fairly mild. My bees can get out for cleansing flights on a regular basis. There has been some discussion previously on Beesourse that feeding sugar during winter months causes dysentery. I have never had one case of dysentery, ever. I never treat with fumagillin, ever. I do however put cider vinegar in every feed I provide to them. I go through several cases of cider vinegar a year. I wouldn't spend the $$ if I didn't think I got a benefit.
    Northern colonies have to endure a fairly long winter inactive period.

    Use REAL cider vinegar, I might add. Not Cider FLAVORED vinegar.

    It is possible, these sugar blocks are not necessary. But I don't have the years of experience some do, and feel comfortable with the extra security. I had excellent overwintering results.

    Hope this helps with your winter prep. Others feel free to add recipes and your techniques.

    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Mille...56954971040510
    Last edited by Lauri; 11-13-2013 at 08:32 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Massillon, Ohio
    Posts
    5,237

    Default Re: My recipe/method for sugar blocks

    Great post Lauri !

    If one does not have a dehydrator or greenhouse available, could the pans be put in a conventional oven on low heat to harden the sugar blocks?
    To everything there is a season....

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Roy, Wa
    Posts
    2,860

    Default Re: My recipe/method for sugar blocks

    Sure, Just set it on low for several hours.
    These Cabelas food dehydrators are very handy to have though. I have even put frames of honey/open nectar in them overnight to be sure the nectar has a low enough moisture content to they won't ferment in storage. Just set it low enough so the wax doesn't melt and walk away. They are digitally controlled and temps are consistent. I've even hatched chicken eggs out in them, in a pinch. They are a little spendy, but I see them regularly in the Cabelas bargain basement for half price.
    They are indispensable for dehydrating food and making jerky.


    /IMG]


    And that my friends, is straight from the horses mouth!

    Last edited by Lauri; 12-15-2013 at 06:41 PM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Kingsport, Sullivan, Tennessee
    Posts
    810

    Default Re: My recipe/method for sugar blocks

    My, what big teeth you have Grandma.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Lake County Ill
    Posts
    490

    Default Re: My recipe/method for sugar blocks

    Lauri
    Would a dehydrator work as a device to decrystallize honey jars (Glass) since the temperature cans be set and controlled? I am looking for something to recrystallize a volume of jars at one time.
    Thanks

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Roy, Wa
    Posts
    2,860

    Default Re: My recipe/method for sugar blocks

    The Cabaleas dehydrator is digetally controlled and very accurate. So accurate and controlable I am going to convert one into a incubator.

    It would work great for gently warming honey already in jars. The wire racks, while stout, would have to be reinforced to hold that much weight though. A solid pan like I use for the bricks would help.
    Lauri Miller.
    Carniolan Hybrids. Glenn, Latshaw & Wild lines.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Posts
    2,208

    Default Re: My recipe/method for sugar blocks

    Lauri...which make/model of dehydrator are using for your sugar blocks? Is the same as the Cabelas one you mention...it looked different in the photos.

    Thanks
    Janne....first hives April 2013, 19 hives, treat, plant zone 8b, at sea level, latitude 49.13, longitude 123.06

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Issaquah,WA,USA
    Posts
    2,674

    Default Re: My recipe/method for sugar blocks

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Gillmore View Post
    Great post Lauri !

    If one does not have a dehydrator or greenhouse available, could the pans be put in a conventional oven on low heat to harden the sugar blocks?
    Yes on low I do mine at 170 the lowest setting in the over. Except for the strong vinegar smell in the house all day it works just fine.

    Quote Originally Posted by beepro View Post
    How does an extended sugar blocks thread
    ended up like this.
    Has anybody tasted the bee pro before to give a description?
    Do people taste the Purina also to see if it is better then the Alpo?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Rader, Greene County, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    10,360

    Default Re: My recipe/method for sugar blocks

    Quote Originally Posted by EastSideBuzz View Post
    Do people taste the Purina also to see if it is better then the Alpo?
    You should know better than to pose such a question on Beesource!

    How about a professional (human) dog food taste tester ...
    http://www.nydailynews.com/life-styl...icle-1.1445406



    ... a more interesting question is ...
    ... does KeithJ taste test Nutra-Bee ...
    ... or does JSL taste test with his product ...
    Graham
    USDA Zone 7A Elevation 1400 ft

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Reno, NV
    Posts
    3,792

    Default Re: My recipe/method for sugar blocks

    Quote Originally Posted by EastSideBuzz View Post

    Do people taste the Purina also to see if it is better then the Alpo?
    I suppose you could. I am not sure what information you would gather by doing so. It seems you think that better taste means better dog food? IN the years I spent breeding dogs we used a lot of factors to evaluate the value of any given food. mainly related to the health and condition of the dogs on any given amount of food.

    Same would be true for subs. a sub bees don't eat has no value.
    Everything gets darker, as it goes to where there is less light. Darrel Tank (5PM drawing instructor)

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Posts
    2,208

    Default Re: My recipe/method for sugar blocks

    How thick are your blocks?
    I tried this way ..used a rack dehydrator..and found it took forever to dry...then it cracked. My trays are about 1.75 inches deep.
    Janne....first hives April 2013, 19 hives, treat, plant zone 8b, at sea level, latitude 49.13, longitude 123.06

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    ireland
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: My recipe/method for sugar blocks

    hi 25# sugarcane the hash is lbs ?

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Denver, Colorado, U.S.A.
    Posts
    2,473

    Default Re: My recipe/method for sugar blocks

    Yes, "#" equals "lbs."
    --shinbone
    (7th year, 13 hives, Zone 5b, 5500')

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Cumberland, Kentucky, USA
    Posts
    70

    Default Re: My recipe/method for sugar blocks

    In the original post there is a picture of a dehydrator I think. What brand / model is it?

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Rader, Greene County, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    10,360

    Default Re: My recipe/method for sugar blocks

    Quote Originally Posted by threepingsthree View Post
    In the original post there is a picture of a dehydrator I think. What brand / model is it?
    In Lauri's post #171 she mentions using a Cabelas dehydrator.
    http://www.beesource.com/forums/show...or#post1101348


    I think you will find it here: http://www.cabelas.com/catalog/searc...tem1=IK-515819
    Graham
    USDA Zone 7A Elevation 1400 ft

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Walker, Alabama, USA
    Posts
    1,530

    Default Re: My recipe/method for sugar blocks

    Use REAL cider vinegar, I might add. Not Cider FLAVORED vinegar.
    Okay, I confess! I don't have a clue what "cider-flavored vinegar" is! To make pickles and a bunch of other stuff I use the ordinary Heinz Cider Vinegar that has the 5% acid level. So is that the "real" cider vinegar or the "flavored" one?



    Rusty
    Rusty Hills Farm -- home of AQHA A Rusty Zipper and Rusty's Bees.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Rader, Greene County, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    10,360

    Default Re: My recipe/method for sugar blocks

    Rusty, Heinz offers vinegar made from apples, and calls it Apple Cider Vinegar:
    http://www.heinzvinegar.com/products...r-vinegar.aspx

    Heinz also offers vinegar made from grain, and calls it Distilled White Vinegar:
    http://www.heinzvinegar.com/products...e-vinegar.aspx


    Then there is this product from a different manufacturer that starts with Distilled White Vinegar, then adds "apple cider flavoring";
    http://www.dutchvalleyfoods.com/prod...vinegar-6-1gal

    Graham
    USDA Zone 7A Elevation 1400 ft

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Roy, Wa
    Posts
    2,860

    Default Re: My recipe/method for sugar blocks

    Actually, in my area, the gallon size Heinz is Apple Cider flavored vinegar. I believe apple cider flavored vinegar is made from grain, while pure apple cider vinegar is made form apples.
    Three Monks brand is the only pure apple cider vinegar I have found.

    "Vinegar with apple cider flavoring, often contains the ingredient natural apple cider flavoring, and may also contain the ingredient caramel coloring. (possibly spelled charamel depending on the brand). Basically you are drinking vinegar that has been flavored and colored to look and taste like apple cider vinegar, as a cheaper alternative, and less acidic alternative to traditional apple cider vinegar. Drinking apple cider flavored vinegar, won't give you the same health benefits as drinking apple cider vinegar will. In fact, you are basically drinking straight up vinegar with artificial flavors and colors added, think of it as a kids juice box with "add in's" in it so to speak."


    (NaturalNews) Apple cider vinegar is often looked upon by natural wellness enthusiasts as a panacea for all good things. Taking a tablespoon or two of it every day is said to cure everything from gout to allergies and more. It's said that it is important that the apple cider vinegar you take be organic and have the "mother" in it to be of most benefit to you. The mother is a stringy-looking ball of matter that either floats at the top or settles at the bottom of a bottle of the vinegar and is the source of its sour, fermented taste.

    Many companies are now creating apple cider vinegar drinks that contain fruity flavors to mask the sometimes harsh flavor the vinegar has on its own. The age of apple cider vinegar as a health tonic is truly here, and while there is only anecdotal evidence that it actually cures many of the things it is said to, there is also plenty of evidence of definite health benefits in other areas.

    Here are some of the best documented and strongest health benefits of apple cider vinegar.

    1. It Helps Ease Stomach Cramps and Diarrhea

    This is a proven apple cider vinegar cure. The probiotics in the vinegar help ease diarrhea and the pectins from the apples in the vinegar ease stomach cramps. Mix a tablespoon or two in water or your favorite juice to get the best results.

    2. It Prevents Indigestion

    Another proven health benefit is its ability to stop indigestion before it starts. Simply mix 1 teaspoon of honey and 1 teaspoon of apple cider vinegar in a cup of water and sip it slowly a half hour before you eat something you know will cause you indigestion. You'll be surprised that you feel fine after eating!

    3. It Helps Ease Nighttime Leg Cramps

    This old folk remedy has a long history of proof to its effectiveness. Simply mix a tablespoon of apple cider vinegar with honey to taste before going to bed and drink it slowly. Those nighttime cramps shouldn't bother you anymore. Do this every night before bed for continuing results.

    4. It Drains Your Sinuses

    Do you have a stuffy nose due to allergies or some other reason? Fix it with a teaspoon of straight apple cider vinegar in a cup of water. The harshness of drinking the vinegar without any flavoring will help drain your sinuses and clear your nose.

    5. It Helps Energize You

    Apple cider vinegar is excellent for beating exhaustion. The amino acids it contains counteract the buildup of lactic acid you can get after exercising or other intense physical activity. It's also full of electrolytes that help eliminate that tired feeling. Electrolytes are the same thing that are in sugary sports drinks. A teaspoon of apple cider vinegar in chilled water has the same energizing effect without the sugar and artificial colors and flavors.

    Apple cider vinegar is also good for treating heartburn, easing the pain of arthritis, whitening teeth, and much, much more. There are entire books written on the miracle of apple cider vinegar. Even though many of its supposed benefits only have folklore to back them up, there is enough concrete evidence of its many benefits that many people take it every day as a general health tonic. Anyone looking to maximize their health could definitely benefit from a daily dose of this amazing amber liquid.
    Last edited by Lauri; 11-02-2013 at 06:30 PM.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Walker, Alabama, USA
    Posts
    1,530

    Default Re: My recipe/method for sugar blocks

    Okay, so I looked at the label and it says it is made from apples! The contents are apple cider vinegar and water. Sounds like that is the real deal, then.

    Thank you both! I learn something new every day!



    Rusty
    Rusty Hills Farm -- home of AQHA A Rusty Zipper and Rusty's Bees.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Huntington ,VT, USA
    Posts
    307

    Default Re: My recipe/method for sugar blocks

    If you use 2:1 syrup to moisten the sugar, it will harden up in few days rather than weeks.....but then you get no vinegar in the mix

Page 1 of 6 123 ... LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •