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  1. #1
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    Jan 2010
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    Alachua County, FL, USA
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    Default Long-Term Effects of Repeated Exposure of Honey Bee Colonies to Flowering Crops Treat

    A Four-Year Field Program Investigating Long-Term Effects of Repeated Exposure of Honey Bee Colonies to Flowering Crops Treated with Thiamethoxam
    Neonicotinoid residues in nectar and pollen from crop plants have been implicated as one of the potential factors causing the declines of honey bee populations. Median residues of thiamethoxam in pollen collected from honey bees after foraging on flowering seed treated maize were found to be between 1 and 7 g/kg, median residues of the metabolite CGA322704 (clothianidin) in the pollen were between 1 and 4 g/kg. In oilseed rape, median residues of thiamethoxam found in pollen collected from bees were between <1 and 3.5 g/kg and in nectar from foraging bees were between 0.65 and 2.4 g/kg. Median residues of CGA322704 in pollen and nectar in the oilseed rape trials were all below the limit of quantification (1 g/kg). Residues in the hive were even lower in both the maize and oilseed rape trials, being at or below the level of detection of 1 g/kg for bee bread in the hive and at or below the level of detection of 0.5 g/kg for hive nectar, honey and royal jelly samples. The long-term risk to honey bee colonies in the field was also investigated, including the sensitive overwintering stage, from four years consecutive single treatment crop exposures to flowering maize and oilseed rape grown from thiamethoxam treated seeds at rates recommended for insect control. Throughout the study, mortality, foraging behavior, colony strength, colony weight, brood development and food storage levels were similar between treatment and control colonies. Detailed examination of brood development throughout the year demonstrated that colonies exposed to the treated crop were able to successfully overwinter and had a similar health status to the control colonies in the following spring. We conclude that these data demonstrate there is a low risk to honey bees from systemic residues in nectar and pollen following the use of thiamethoxam as a seed treatment on oilseed rape and maize.
    http://www.plosone.org/article/info%...l.pone.0077193
    americasbeekeeper.com
    beekeeper@americasbeekeeper.com

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
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    Athens, OH
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    2,668

    Default Re: Long-Term Effects of Repeated Exposure of Honey Bee Colonies to Flowering Crops T

    "Flowering maize" is corn?
    Politics is the entertainment branch of industry. -Frank Zappa

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
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    5,847

    Default Re: Long-Term Effects of Repeated Exposure of Honey Bee Colonies to Flowering Crops T

    Thiamethoxam is the treatment we use on our canola for flea beetle protection. Two week protection period after planting as the pesticide levels decrease with growth and become in effective

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
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    syracuse n.y.
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    1,876

    Default Re: Long-Term Effects of Repeated Exposure of Honey Bee Colonies to Flowering Crops T

    I haven't read the entire piece yet but found interesting

    The study included an investigation of potential carryover of residues from rotation of seed treated barley to a following crop of seed treated oilseed rape, and from a two year seed treated maize rotation. they at least did a 2 year test, but I can't see where they gave the results after the first year to see if the #'S Go up.

    also they say the seed are treated with a "flowable" pesticide, I assume that this means the seed's were not treated as most seeds aroound me are with the seeds having the pesticide all ready on the seed when delivered.
    mike syracuse ny
    I went to bed mean, and woke up meaner. Marshal Dillon

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    Alachua County, FL, USA
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    Default Re: Long-Term Effects of Repeated Exposure of Honey Bee Colonies to Flowering Crops T

    It does mean the seed are treated before sale or delivery. The problem really becomes when middlemen apply an additional treatment, possibly with a different product and usually without the adjudavents that regulate the release and retention of the product. The second application is not only inherently more toxic, but quite frequently was not applied with the safeguards to make it work in the safest manner. This straight from the largest seed supplier. . .
    americasbeekeeper.com
    beekeeper@americasbeekeeper.com

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