Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Alachua County, FL, USA
    Posts
    6,880

    Default Pesticide Residues Detected in Pollen Trapped from Honey Bees in Connecticut

    Using a Hazard Quotient to Evaluate Pesticide Residues Detected in Pollen Trapped from Honey Bees (Apis mellifera) in Connecticut
    Analysis of pollen trapped from honey bees as they return to their hives provides a method of monitoring fluctuations in one route of pesticide exposure over location and time. We collected pollen from apiaries in five locations in Connecticut, including urban, rural, and mixed agricultural sites, for periods from two to five years. Pollen was analyzed for pesticide residues using a standard extraction method widely used for pesticides (QuEChERS) and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometric analysis. Sixty pesticides or metabolites were detected. Because the dose lethal to 50% of adult worker honey bees (LD50) is the only toxicity parameter available for a wide range of pesticides, and among our pesticides there were contact LD50 values ranging from 0.006 to >1000 μg per bee (range 166,000X), and even among insecticides LD50 values ranged from 0.006 to 59.8 μg/bee (10,000X); therefore we propose that in studies of honey bee exposure to pesticides that concentrations be reported as Hazard Quotients as well as in standard concentrations such as parts per billion. We used both contact and oral LD50 values to calculate Pollen Hazard Quotients (PHQ = concentration in ppb ÷ LD50 as μg/bee) when both were available. In this study, pesticide Pollen Hazard Quotients ranged from over 75,000 to 0.01. The pesticides with the greatest Pollen Hazard Quotients at the maximum concentrations found in our study were (in descending order): phosmet, Imidacloprid, indoxacarb, chlorpyrifos, fipronil, thiamethoxam, azinphos-methyl, and fenthion, all with at least one Pollen Hazard Quotient (using contact or oral LD50) over 500. At the maximum rate of pollen consumption by nurse bees, a Pollen Hazard Quotient of 500 would be approximately equivalent to consuming 0.5% of the LD50 per day. We also present an example of a Nectar Hazard Quotient and the percentage of LD50 per day at the maximum nectar consumption rate.
    http://www.plosone.org/article/info%...l.pone.0077550
    americasbeekeeper.com
    beekeeper@americasbeekeeper.com

  2. #2

    Default Re: Pesticide Residues Detected in Pollen Trapped from Honey Bees in Connecticut

    There goes american honey sales to the floor. who is going to buy and eat honey with pesticides in it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    McClure, OH
    Posts
    1,017

    Default Re: Pesticide Residues Detected in Pollen Trapped from Honey Bees in Connecticut

    The most alarming fact, at least to me is that the pesticide residue is in the pollen. I believe that it is an accepted practice to not apply pesticide during bloom in order to protect pollinators (all pollinators and not just honey bees). Maybe I am wrong in thinking this.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    KC, MO, USA
    Posts
    1,162

    Default Re: Pesticide Residues Detected in Pollen Trapped from Honey Bees in Connecticut

    Some pesticides are put on the seed and absorbed by the plant throughout the plants life, then go back into the soil for the next plants/weed to absorb.
    It can take years for some pesticide to break down in the soil.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Mirabel, Québec, Canada
    Posts
    423

    Default Re: Pesticide Residues Detected in Pollen Trapped from Honey Bees in Connecticut

    Quote Originally Posted by merince View Post
    The most alarming fact, at least to me is that the pesticide residue is in the pollen. I believe that it is an accepted practice to not apply pesticide during bloom in order to protect pollinators (all pollinators and not just honey bees). Maybe I am wrong in thinking this.
    I don't think the law cares about non-cultured flowers, neither here nor where you live. Sure, it's illegal to spray on apple blossoms and the like, but dandelion, lotus, clover, goldenrod, and the rest...? Pretty sure nobody thinks twice before spraying those.

    And as FlowerPlanter said, spraying during the bloom isn't the only way to get pesticide residues in the pollen.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    McClure, OH
    Posts
    1,017

    Default Re: Pesticide Residues Detected in Pollen Trapped from Honey Bees in Connecticut

    Quote Originally Posted by Dominic View Post
    I don't think the law cares about non-cultured flowers, neither here nor where you live. Sure, it's illegal to spray on apple blossoms and the like, but dandelion, lotus, clover, goldenrod, and the rest...? Pretty sure nobody thinks twice before spraying those.

    And as FlowerPlanter said, spraying during the bloom isn't the only way to get pesticide residues in the pollen.
    Sure, and I have seen it in action. However, don't you think there would be more residue associated with the urban areas (due to lawn and garden maintenance) as opposed to rural?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Spring Tx
    Posts
    113

    Default Re: Pesticide Residues Detected in Pollen Trapped from Honey Bees in Connecticut

    They will care one day when food is not plentiful and prices are sky high, ya go ahead and play with "Mother Nature".

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Mirabel, Québec, Canada
    Posts
    423

    Default Re: Pesticide Residues Detected in Pollen Trapped from Honey Bees in Connecticut

    Quote Originally Posted by merince View Post
    Sure, and I have seen it in action. However, don't you think there would be more residue associated with the urban areas (due to lawn and garden maintenance) as opposed to rural?
    I really couldn't say. It used to be that the government cracked down on pesticide use in urban landscapes... but they've slacked off on this. Just a few years back, they approved a pesticide for grubs in lawns over here...

    Sadly, pesticides are everywhere, even where they aren't allowed, even where you'd least expect it. For the moment, my hives are on other people's lands, but when I get a land of my own, flooding the landscape with bee-friendly crops is on my priority list. One can't prevent his bees from going anywhere, but creating an overabundance of nectar and pollen sources nearby ought to discourage them from needlessly traveling further into lands you have no control over.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    26,812

    Default Re: Pesticide Residues Detected in Pollen Trapped from Honey Bees in Connecticut

    So, do you know that pesticides are found on Himilayan mountain peaks? There isn't anywhere you can hide.
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Dominican Republic
    Posts
    8

    Default Re: Pesticide Residues Detected in Pollen Trapped from Honey Bees in Connecticut

    Quote Originally Posted by sqkcrk View Post
    So, do you know that pesticides are found on Himilayan mountain peaks? There isn't anywhere you can hide.
    Even In a 3rd world country where poverty is rampant and locals cannot afford any type of chemical/ pesticide it exists. What is becoming of our world besides greed? What do we leave our children? An empty shell of a infrastructure?
    So sad...
    The Constitution State?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    26,812

    Default Re: Pesticide Residues Detected in Pollen Trapped from Honey Bees in Connecticut

    The winds of the World go everywhere unimpeded by man. The winds blow all sorts of chemicals where they are not applied. Not to mention rain.
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads