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Thread: weighing hives

  1. #41
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    Default Re: weighing hives

    If you feed, feed them all. Especially feed the stronger colonies. Those are the ones that you will split in the Spring. While the ones you merely get thru the Winter because you fed are not.

    If you open feed, it's the strong ones that get the feed.
    Mark Berninghausen
    The answers are the end. The questions are the journey. Journey on.



  2. #42
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    Default Re: weighing hives

    Quote Originally Posted by sqkcrk View Post
    If you open feed, it's the strong ones that get the feed.
    Does distance matter? The times that I have open feed (on the deck) there was a host of insects taking part in the feast. I didn't see too much fighting even with rival insects. Maybe it was the time of year. Although I have let the bees clean up my extractor and I know that would have been fall. I don't remember seeing much fighting there either.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  3. #43
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    Default Re: weighing hives

    Strong hives have more foraging bees.
    Mark Berninghausen
    The answers are the end. The questions are the journey. Journey on.



  4. #44
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    Default Re: weighing hives

    OK that makes sense.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  5. #45
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    Default Re: weighing hives

    I was afraid to feed the strong hive they have that top deep so full I can hardly lift it , I was thinking it would crowd them even more . Or can the top deep be packed full and they they pretty much live in the bottom deep .Also I have some wet frames , can I feed them in a empty box on top of the inner cover while treating with MAQS.

  6. #46
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    Default Re: weighing hives

    Well, now I am beginning to wonder. Are you calling a strong hive one with a lot of honey or one with a lot of bees?

    I think of a strong hive as one with a lot of bees with adequate honey. I don't see a lot of sense in treating a strong hive but that is another subject.

    What are your goals for next year?
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  7. #47
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    Default Re: weighing hives

    > I was afraid to feed the strong hive they have that top deep so full I can hardly lift it

    If you take some of those honey frames and give them to the weaker hives as David suggested, then there will be room for the strong hives to store more.
    Graham
    USDA Zone 7A Elevation 1400 ft

  8. #48
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    Default Re: weighing hives

    Acebird , The strong hive #3 to me is very heavy with honey in the top deep and weighs in at 155 pds. also its overflowing with bees . Maybe i'm wrong in treating it , I was told to treat all hives in the bee yard if any of your hives test positive for mites and just assumed it would have mites to , does a strong hive mean it won't have mites.My goal next year is to expand just a little and split my strong hives.

    Rader , So if I understand I could move some good frames from the strong hive over to the weaker one , if so what do I want to move , brood or just honey and brush the bees off .

  9. #49
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    Default Re: weighing hives

    > I could move some good frames from the strong hive over to the weaker one , if so what do I want to move , brood or just honey and brush the bees off .

    Your original question was about feeding. And David's response was about moving honey frames from the stronger hives and then feeding all hives. If that is your goal, then there is no need to move brood or bees. Just brush the bees off the honey frames you want to move.

    If you want to strengthen weaker hives by moving bees/brood, that is a different issue, but also possible. You do need to make sure that you are not accidentally moving the queen. David LaFerney offers good advice on this in one of your earlier threads. See post #7.
    http://www.beesource.com/forums/show...mes#post976898
    Graham
    USDA Zone 7A Elevation 1400 ft

  10. #50
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    Default Re: weighing hives

    Rader , When I was talking about moving frames I meant taking frames of honey from the heavy hive and putting them in the top deep of the lighter hive to boost up there weight and stores for winter , two full frames of honey could beef up the 85 pd #2 hive buy almost 15 to 20 pds. ,is this a good or bad idea.

  11. #51
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    Default Re: weighing hives

    Laketrout, I don't treat so you don't want to listen to me. My logic is that the strong hive wouldn't be strong if it was infested with mites. The weak hive could be succumbing to mites but you won't know if they can make it on their own if you treat.

    Next spring will tell you which hive is the strong hive and that is the one I would split. The weak hives will perish so you use that equipment for your splits or expanding apiary.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  12. #52
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    Default Re: weighing hives

    Brian,
    Strong hives can be infested w/ mites. As long as the ratio is not burdensome the strong hive will Winter fine.

    Weak hives may not be weak from mites and not burdened by mites and still not last thru winter. Or they might.

    Of course Spring splits should be made from the strong hives. Unless, later in the year you follow Michael Palmer's Nuc building program and make nucs from underproductive colonies.
    Mark Berninghausen
    The answers are the end. The questions are the journey. Journey on.



  13. #53
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    Default Re: weighing hives

    Since it is getting late in the season, you can potentially load a super of empty frames (preferably drawn) on the 155 pound hive (under their full supers, as close to the nest as possible) and feed them, so they fill the frames. Couple positives: 1) the strong hive should be able to take care of any robbers and 2) they have the right mixture of bees to store and cap quickly (as evidenced by the fact that they produced supers). Then take the frames out of this super and supplement the weaker hives. You can always do candy boards after frost, too.

  14. #54
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    Default Re: weighing hives

    Quote Originally Posted by sqkcrk View Post
    Unless, later in the year you follow Michael Palmer's Nuc building program and make nucs from underproductive colonies.
    He raises queens and I would assume he doesn't let the runts raise their own queen.
    The colony that can handle what ever is thrown at it is the colony I want in my apiary. Without lifting a finger spring tells me which one that is.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  15. #55
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    Default Re: weighing hives

    This is interesting , I have my first 24 hr. mite count with MAQS after taking my honey off. The strong hive #3 at 155 pds had 850 mites , hive #2 the weak hive had 175 and my best hive the only one that gave me any honey #1 50 mites but this one was odd, the bees moved all to one side of the deep , there was no debris on the count sheet on the one side and no mites either .I'll keep checking , weather has been cool not much sun but they are flying .

  16. #56
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    Default Re: weighing hives

    What about your Nosema levels. Don't forget the nosema.
    Mark Berninghausen
    The answers are the end. The questions are the journey. Journey on.



  17. #57
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    Default Re: weighing hives

    What do guys think of these counts , I think the heavy hive would have been dead come spring with so many mites , can't figure out why the one with only 50 mites and only mites on half of the board .

    Nosema ,sqkcrk , I wasn't going to worry about it as I have no way to test for it , what are you doing treating anyway as a precaution. I do have a bottle of Fumagilin-B let me know if you recomend me using it . Not sure if this would be a sign of trouble but I have noticed the hive that had so many mites has alot more bee poop on the front landing than the other hives , could it be nosema or is that dysentery ?
    Last edited by laketrout; 10-17-2013 at 04:16 PM.

  18. #58
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    Default Re: weighing hives

    laketrout,

    I have no idea on the one-sided mite drop. I was wondering if maybe that's where the cluster space / nest is.

  19. #59
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    Default Re: weighing hives

    merince , thats what it looks like there all clustered on one side but we have warm enough temps for them to move around and fly and the other hives aren't having a problem .

  20. #60
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    Default Re: weighing hives

    Quote Originally Posted by laketrout View Post
    What do guys think of these counts , I think the heavy hive would have been dead come spring with so many mites , can't figure out why the one with only 50 mites and only mites on half of the board .
    Well if you go back to your weight measurement you can clearly see that stored honey is not symmetrical. You will not get a lot of mite fall in the honey section. I have seen mites rain down in the tray below and then nothing. How does one tell if high mite fall is a good thing or a bad thing? I have seen wax chips all on one side. I think you will go nuts trying to make bees fall into a pattern that you can predict without having many exceptions. They can adapt. They will never put a sister or brother on the moon but they will survive a nuclear holocaust better then we will because they are adaptable and we aren't.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

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