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Thread: Dying hive

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Bellville tx USA
    Posts
    1

    Default Dying hive

    I just started bee keeping last spring. I started with two hives. They both did well until the first of Sept. One hive is doing great but I noticed the other wasn't thriving as well. I fed both hives 2:1 syrup (inside frame feeder)and pollen patties. When I checked the hives this week, one is still doing great but the other is full of dead bees, has beetles and a spider like web, and almost no capped honey or brood. I know it won't make it thru the winter, so my question is----What do I do with it? What do I do with the drawn comb and the frames? Can I freeze them for the winter and put them in a new hive in the spring? Should I throw them away? CanI clean and sterilize them so they can be reused? I don't want to infect another hive but I hate to throw them out.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Sacramento,California,USA
    Posts
    3,787

    Default Re: Dying hive

    What I would do is shake the frames off out on the ground, and then freeze them for a couple days to kill any pests off. If the other hive is strong enough, I'd give them some, and store the rest in sealed garbage bags with some moth balls in it until spring. Then air them out for a week before re-using again with spring splits or packages. If you have room, keep them in the freezer until needed in spring. There's several options.
    “When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world.” – John Muir

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    tacoma, wa. usa
    Posts
    169

    Default Re: Dying hive

    I would agree with freezing the frames, you indicate spider like web? if this is on the comb, it is likely moth damage. The freezing will take care of this. I wouldn't use moth balls (naphthalene) as it's not good for bee's, even if you air it out a week....there are other chemicals if you want to opt that way, but freezing them as is should work fine until you put them back in service and just let your bee's clean them up in the spring. If you can do a decent evaluation of the remaining bee's you may want to consider combining them with the remaining hive.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Rader, Greene County, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    6,323

    Default Re: Dying hive

    Welcome to Beesource!

    If you do choose to use a mothball type product, the correct active ingredient to use is para-dichlorobenzene, also known as p-dichlorobenzene, pDCB, or PDB. As tacomabees said, do not use naphthalene mothballs.
    Graham
    -- The real problem is not precise language, it's clear language. - Richard Feynman

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Sacramento,California,USA
    Posts
    3,787

    Default Re: Dying hive

    Thanks you both for clarifying for me. All I've seen is the para moth products and is what I've used in the past.
    “When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world.” – John Muir

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