Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 41 to 43 of 43

Thread: Mite count.

  1. #41

    Default Re: Mite count.

    Quote Originally Posted by Colleen O. View Post
    In hindsight after the mite counts I should have pinched the two high mite count queens, combined my favorite with the larger colony and combined the other two. They may all have made it then.
    I would be a pit causious about uniting colonies, that are having problems, with healthier colonies. There might be viruses and uniting can cause more harm than good. Good surviving colonies with low mite counts are best suited to make increase. I would leave the ones with troubles untouched, or carry them into one special yard of weak colonies. Sometimes some of them can suddenly start growing again, most of them will perish.
    Treatment free, honey production, isolation mated queens, www.saunalahti.fi/lunden/varroakertomus.html

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Delhi, New York, USA
    Posts
    347

    Default Re: Mite count.

    I just went into my hives today....the Buckfast hive did great, exactly how yours did; minimal usage of honey, hardly touched the candy board and they weren't interested in the pollen pattie.
    I used the screened bottom board for mite counts and treated with MAQS in the fall. They were very gentle and had a good sized cluster. I am very happy with them and can't wait for the queens to come in June.

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    St. Louis, Missouri, USA
    Posts
    626

    Default Re: Mite count.

    Quote Originally Posted by Juhani Lunden View Post
    I would be a pit causious about uniting colonies, that are having problems, with healthier colonies. There might be viruses and uniting can cause more harm than good. Good surviving colonies with low mite counts are best suited to make increase. I would leave the ones with troubles untouched, or carry them into one special yard of weak colonies. Sometimes some of them can suddenly start growing again, most of them will perish.
    I was concerned about that. In the fall the only sign of problems were the mite counts. The one I lost to dysentery, I believe the honey got fouled by small hive beetles because it was frothing/fermenting in the comb.

    I would like to keep both overwintered queens here at my home yard where I can keep a close eye on them but when I take the Buckfast queen out and the new queens are mated I could take that original colony (minus the original queen and a few bars) to a remote location. Would that be enough to minimize the potential problem?

    Would it be better if when I remove her I release her in a nuc made from my colony with the better mite count and no sign of viruses? Then I could take the whole colony with their newly mated daughter queen to the remote location.

    Right now the Buckfast colony is building better than the MNH Mutts but the mutts are catching up fast (they were 3 brood bars to 5 a few weeks ago) and seeing 4 DWV bees and having such a high mite count I think the Buckfast will start falling behind in the next month or so.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads