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Thread: Honey Labels;

  1. #41
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    Default Re: Honey Labels;

    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel Y View Post
    4. Whole food to Fancy Up scale is exactly what I am looking for. we are also considering selling much of it as a holiday, Gift. Gift basket sort of product. It is likely we could end up in nothing but Upscale due to other products I can make and sell.
    If you are targeting the upper end of the market, then packaging is of the utmost importance.

    Think of it like wine. What do you look forward to drinking more? The wine that has the elegant, classy feel and look to it. And when you drink it, you need to take the cork out and you your nicest wine glasses ......or....

    Do you want franzia? Box-O-wine? Where you drink it out of a solo or dixie cup?

    What experience do you want your customer to have?
    Do you put a short blurb on the back of the packaging that tells what type of bees the honey came from? The landscape? The family that raises the bees? et cetera.

    How do you connect your customer with you/the product and give them the opportunity to feel like this honey was made just for them?
    Last edited by Jared.Downs; 09-28-2013 at 09:42 AM. Reason: odd words... here and there.

  2. #42
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    Default Re: Honey Labels;

    Quote Originally Posted by cg3 View Post
    If you're going after the upscale market why cheap out on packaging?
    I wouldn't know I hadn't thought of doing so. I would have to assume you did. so you tell me. I said I take care in how I spend my customers money. And that was after someone pointed out it is the customer paying for the label not me. So far what I have seen and what they want to charge for it is not responsible spending of my customers money. I consider paying more than what something is worth being not only cheap but irresponsible.

    As for what I am doing now. That is for my friends family and coworkers. I have not yet started "Marketing" my honey. That is one of the things I am the process of ding and it is not yet even a top priority. The label we have right now is not much more than a way those people can give our contact info to anyone they find interested in it. A lot of our honey has been sold with no label at all.
    Stand for what you believe, even if you stand alone.

  3. #43
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    Default Re: Honey Labels;

    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel Y View Post
    And that was after someone pointed out it is the customer paying for the label not me.

    As for what I am doing now. That is for my friends family and coworkers.
    @Daniel Y-

    While it's true your customer is paying for the packaging...it ultimately cuts into your margins. From a business perspective, I'd rather not look at it as though my customer is paying for the packaging. Instead I'd look at what percentage of your retail price you want to devote to packaging.

    I remember either talking with some one or reading some where on here that the small containers for honey often can account for a greater percentage of the cost to make the goods when compared to selling say a 5 pound container of honey.

    If you can maintain that percentage (what you deem you want to spend for packaging) across every different amount of honey you sell then I'd think it'd be a more business sound approach.

    As for your comment about friends, family, co-workers. It sounds like word-of-mouth is more how you've been selling than relying on packaging or a retail setting. If that is the case, you could always go with a clean simple label....I'd actually go with a tag. This way you could undo the "tag," wash the container and do a deposit / return program since you know all your customers and re-coop some of the packaging cost. Plus it's environmentally friendly. Another marketing strategy.

    It sounds like your at such a small scale that you have a lot more ways to get creative.
    Last edited by Jared.Downs; 09-28-2013 at 10:55 AM. Reason: bad sentences

  4. #44
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    Default Re: Honey Labels;

    Probably don't want to make your own but here is a few labels https://app.box.com/s/8rfmn4wd2g7lsne19udn . I use the program photoscape to add the words (i.e Kansas Wildflower Honey).

  5. #45
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    Default Re: Honey Labels;

    Quote Originally Posted by Jared.Downs View Post
    How do you connect your customer with you/the product and give them the opportunity to feel like this honey was made just for them?
    Overthinking it a bit.
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

  6. #46
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    Default Re: Honey Labels;

    It's kind of hard discussing things w/ folks who aren't doing things that we are discussing. If you aren't really selling honey of course you don't need to buy nice labels. And I never meant to imply that I advocate expensive labels anyway. Just good labels which do the job you want them to.
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

  7. #47
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    Default Re: Honey Labels;

    Quote Originally Posted by sqkcrk View Post
    Overthinking it a bit.
    I respectfully disagree. I understand where you're coming from though.

    Some companies or brands don't operate in the manner I'm describing above. Some focus on their product while others focus on delivering an experience to their customers and these companies recognize that the product is just one portion of the experience.

    You can still sell honey without doing what I've mentioned above but I'm willing to bet that you would get a better following for your brand / product if you did.

    The day I start selling honey at retail, I'll be try to establish a connection with the customer to show them my process and make them feel like they are apart of it.

    The connection I'm talking about is shown in videos made by manufacturing companies that make to show their products being manufactured by the people that work in the factories. They want you to develop an understanding for the product and see that there is a person that made your product.

  8. #48
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    Default Re: Honey Labels;

    When I put jars on a grocery store shelf, where 90% of my honey is sold, how do I go about making a customer feel as though I put up jar number 692 just for them? What item do you buy that you feel was made just for you?
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

  9. #49
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    Default Re: Honey Labels;

    Quote Originally Posted by sqkcrk View Post
    When I put jars on a grocery store shelf, where 90% of my honey is sold, how do I go about making a customer feel as though I put up jar number 692 just for them? What item do you buy that you feel was made just for you?
    Mark, your questions are great as it helps me brainstorm / think of different ways for all of this. Keeping in mind there is no "right" way to do this....if there was, everyone would do it. And retail can be a tricky.

    But trial and error with these ideas will hold the truth to how your customers react. Or you could do all of this and your sales do not change due to the grocery store not seeing an increase in foot traffic.

    And keeping in mind, getting a new customer and keeping an existing customer are two different target audiences.

    But your comment about "jar number 692," how many do you bottle at a time and put on a shelf? You might think about numbering them ex. (692/1000) While this doesn't speak to the product being made for that specific customer and more to the "collector" or "connoisseur," that's one approach that might increase sales.

    And maybe I should switch my statement from "made just for you" to "making you feel apart of the process"? Aside from monogramming / tailoring (clothing as an example) it might be hard to provide that feeling for your customer.

    Let's say you bottle 1,000 jars at a time. Each one gets it's label. But you decide to print a tag or wrap the jar with a piece of card stock that the consumer will remove prior to opening the jar. On that tag / card stock, you print a graphic / image / text that shows you (Mark) working the bees. It shows the bee keeper that does all the hard work. etc. And maybe you make three versions of this, that way your existing customer gets to see a different one and learn something new about your operation each time they purchase your product. And maybe being because of that graphic / image / text, a new customer decides to purchase your honey rather than the stuff from Ecuador or other parts of Central and South America.

    Maybe that card stock isn't printed? Maybe it's a combination embossing / debossing?
    One thing to keep in mind is, at the end of the day it's all about differentiating your brand/product from the other guys.

  10. #50
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    Default Re: Honey Labels;

    30,000lbs worth 2 years ago. Not as much the last cpl years. I have 250 buckets put up so far w/ more to come as I get the last of this year's crop off and extracted.

    I have been doing this for some time now. I'm sure there are books written on Product Labeling and all sorts of courses on Marketing found in any Small Business Schools you could find.

    I like to keep my label simple and sweet, like my honey. It's generic in a way, but being yellow w/ black lettering you can't miss it from across any room. Other than my 5lb jar label which has illustration on it, my labels are all text. They tell the customer what they need to know and does not elaborate on how the honey was produced or processed. Other than some of the honey I identify as Buckwheat, Orange Blossom, Bamboo, Blueberry Blossom, or Cranberry/Basswood, my label identifies the contents of the jar as HONEY.

    I like your hang tag idea. DanielY might not like me passing the cost onto the customer though.

    I attended a Small Business Course a couple of years ago and the Instructor recommended that I change my label and Company name. He thought I should have my face on the label. I guess that it should be the whole label actually. And change the name to something which said something about what the company is, rather than "Squeak Creek Apiaries". But I maintained that once you got used to the name you'd never forget it. Squeak Creek is where I live.

    I have never had any trouble selling as much honey as I want to and could sell much more if I wanted to. What I am doing has worked well enough for me. I think I will keep on doing it. But I do like kicking around ideas.

    I may work up that hangtag idea. Unfortunately the guy I like working w/ on things like that has moved far away.
    Last edited by sqkcrk; 09-28-2013 at 03:40 PM.
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

  11. #51
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    Default Re: Honey Labels;

    30,000 lbs.... how's your back? That's a solid amount of honey.

    Some people love the saying "if it ain't broke, don't fix it" but I am in the business of always trying to improve things.

    If you're happy with how things are going then that's awesome. If you're well established in your area, then keep doing what you're doing and make minor adjustments as you need to.

    As a designer that's done branding for companies, I see nothing wrong with your name being "Squeak Creek Apiaries." I actually like that it's not generic or lengthy.

    I know in my previous post I mentioned showing you "working" the bees. But I'd suggest not putting your face on the label. Not knowing whether Squeak Creek is an actual creek, I might have an iconic part of the creek (if it is a creek) with a bee getting a drink of water or something that speaks to your area.

    As far as small business schools and what other people say, take it all with a grain of salt including what I've said. You know your market / product better than any one here or any where else.

  12. #52
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    Default Re: Honey Labels;

    My back is just fine. Thanks. Carried 8 buckets of honey into the house today, two at a time.

    Yeah, I didn't get along w/ the instructor too well. He didn't care for me either after a while. Maybe if I had gone to his class back when I was starting out rather than after being at it as long as I had.
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

  13. #53
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    Default Re: Honey Labels;

    Actually I like the Hang tag and for some bottles it is about the only thing I an think of that I like. What I don't like about them is that will be separated from the bottle. Also keep in mind they do not work well if you sell honey at farmers markets and such where you will be packing and unpacking those bottles. those tags tend to take a beating. You can also end up with a lot of people touching the tag to see what is written on or in it. Which can result in it needed to be replaced if ti gets dirty. Printed cards could actually be far cheaper than labels.
    Stand for what you believe, even if you stand alone.

  14. #54
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    Default Re: Honey Labels;

    At least some states require that the label be fixed to the container.
    Politics is the entertainment branch of industry. -Frank Zappa

  15. #55
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    Default Re: Honey Labels;

    One shouldn't use a hangtag as a label. Charlie's right. Follow State label regulations.

    (regulations? when will this oppresive government get off our backs?)
    oops, sorry. something in my brain.
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

  16. #56
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    Default Re: Honey Labels;

    If you're required to attach the label but want alternatives for packaging / label, then I'd put the bare minimum on the container and put the rest of the info you want to include where ever / how ever fits your brand and message.

    This isn't exactly what I had in mind with the attached card stock but it's along the lines.


    Again, not entirely how I'd do it. More of a card stock wrapping the entire bottle from front to back.

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