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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Utica, NY
    Posts
    10,024

    Default Are the Canadians wrong?

    Catch the Buzz:

    “We have concluded that current agricultural practices related to the use of neonicotinoid-treated corn and soybean seed are not sustainable,” the agency says in a statement.

    I tried this thread yesterday and didn't phrase the title correctly. I didn't mean to insult anyone.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Athens, OH
    Posts
    2,730

    Default Re: Are the Canadians wrong?

    They're just talking about planting procedures, not quitting the use of these chemicals.
    Buy the ticket, take the ride. -H.S. Thompson

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Toronto, ON Canada
    Posts
    92

    Default Re: Are the Canadians wrong?

    Dr. Tibor I. Szabo take on the issue is here.

    There's been a constant stream of news stories in ontario the last couple years of beekeepers loosing mass amounts of bees due to confirmed acute pesticide poisoning.


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Toronto, ON Canada
    Posts
    92

    Default Re: Are the Canadians wrong?

    We know the pesticides are a problem. Instead of being cautious, it seems they are just going to institute a few minor changes in planting procedures and the government is still trying to use varroa as a scapegoat.


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Athens, OH
    Posts
    2,730

    Default Re: Are the Canadians wrong?

    We have it here, too. It seems to be planting practises are indeed a problem.
    Buy the ticket, take the ride. -H.S. Thompson

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Utica, NY
    Posts
    10,024

    Default Re: Are the Canadians wrong?

    Can you explain that? If it were just the planting practices why would it happen everywhere? Isn't it the chemical that is killing the bees? I thought when the chemical hits the ground it becomes inert. Can't be if the bees die from contact with the dust. Most of the dust is going to hit the ground, no?
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

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