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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Campbell, Wyoming USA
    Posts
    438

    Default Honey temperature

    I've got a double jacketed bottling tank I picked up from one of the beekeeping suppliers online. I've currently got it warming my honey but it's been three days and still isn't as fluid as I would like it to be before I bottle it. What's the warmest temperature I can keep it at without causing damage/harm to the honey. It's a 55gal. bottling tank and I've only got 15 gal in it, it wasn't a solid mass of crystalized honey but it was pretty thick. I've got about another 60 gallons of honey I need to warm in this thing and I don't want it taking until Thanksgiving before I can bottle.
    We the willing have done so much with so little for so long we can now do anything with nothing

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Flora,IL
    Posts
    2,644

    Default Re: Honey temperature

    they should be set to about 105. your honey should bottle great at that temp, and it shouldn't take more than 3 hours to warm up. we run ours at 105 and its very fluid. One question is what kind of valve do you have on it??

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Campbell, Wyoming USA
    Posts
    438

    Default Re: Honey temperature

    Quote Originally Posted by gmcharlie View Post
    they should be set to about 105. your honey should bottle great at that temp, and it shouldn't take more than 3 hours to warm up. we run ours at 105 and its very fluid. One question is what kind of valve do you have on it??
    No idea, a dripless honey bottling valve? It just has a 14" piece of 3/8" metal round stock coming off of it that you pull down and a metal bracket that acts as a fulcrum to pry up the valve and then the honey flows out. The tank is currently set at 109 but it's been at that temp for 3 days and the honey is definitely warming it's just not warm enough that it's clear; it still has a milky color to it (it's white honey and when I extracted it's so light it's almost void of any color. Looks almost like HFCS)
    We the willing have done so much with so little for so long we can now do anything with nothing

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Bolton, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    277

    Default Re: Honey temperature

    Have you checked the actual temperature of the honey? Is it a the set point temp.?
    Maybe one or more of your heating elements are not working.
    What voltage is the tank rated for?

    Glen
    You Tube bee Channel Zone 5A
    http://www.youtube.com/user/GlenGH

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Grosse Ile, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    2,901

    Default Re: Honey temperature

    Sounds to me like Moon is saying that the honey has some crystallization in it which is making it pretty thick. A temp of 109 is not nearly hot enough to dissolve the sugar crystals, you need to go up to at least 130 to do that, but at that temp you begin to destroy nutrients in the honey.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    28,061

    Default Re: Honey temperature

    If it is partly crystalized you will have to raise the temperature up to 140 degrees at least and more likely 150 to get rid of all of the crystals.

    That sure seems like a HUGE tank. I have two Maxant Bottling Tanks which each hold 25 gallons each, which is plenty for me. I bottle as much as 30,000lbs of honey per year using both of them.

    I can't imagine washing out a 55 gallon bottling tank.
    Mark Berninghausen
    Squeak Creek Apiaries



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Palmer, Kansas, USA
    Posts
    98

    Default Re: Honey temperature

    Quote Originally Posted by sqkcrk View Post
    If it is partly crystalized you will have to raise the temperature up to 140 degrees at least and more likely 150 to get rid of all of the crystals.

    That sure seems like a HUGE tank. I have two Maxant Bottling Tanks which each hold 25 gallons each, which is plenty for me. I bottle as much as 30,000lbs of honey per year using both of them.

    I can't imagine washing out a 55 gallon bottling tank.
    I can't imagine bottling 30, 000 lbs of honey. Both of our minds were blown I guess.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    28,061

    Default Re: Honey temperature

    It's not something one does all at once.
    Mark Berninghausen
    Squeak Creek Apiaries



  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Campbell, Wyoming USA
    Posts
    438

    Default Re: Honey temperature

    I guess my concern with heating it to the point where it destroys or melts all of the crystals in the honey is that it damages the nutritional value of it? Maybe I'm off base on my thinking, I need to read up on honey and honey bottling more. I think I've got a couple of good books on it. I'm trying to sell the highest quality product possible and perhaps I'm under the mistaken assumption that means not heating your honey over a certain temp.

    Pasteurizing:

    Definition of PASTEURIZATION
    1: partial sterilization of a substance and especially a liquid (as milk) at a temperature and for a period of exposure that destroys objectionable organisms without major chemical alteration of the substance

    Based off of this definition I know people are going to say 'Well honey doesn't have any organisms or bacteria in it etc... etc... etc..' I'm just referring to heating it to a point where it alters the flavor and destroys the pollen grains in it.
    We the willing have done so much with so little for so long we can now do anything with nothing

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    28,061

    Default Re: Honey temperature

    If you heat it to 160 degrees for a period of time you will alter, notice I wrote alter, the color, because you have burnt the sugars in the honey. This may or may not alter the taste. It will not destroy the taste. Unless you really burn it. Caramelize it.

    The pollen is still there.

    I don't think anyone really depends on nutrition when consuming honey. I think you are holding nutritional value of honey too high. It's a sweetener. A special sweetener because of how it's made, where it comes from.

    If you are as concerned as you say, then you should not be heating it at all. You should be bottling it in the appropriate jars and selling it as RAW Honey. No matter what your customers may wish to have. Educate them that you don't heat it for reasons you hold. Me, I give people choices. Liquid or RAW. RAW meaning unheated and unstrained.
    Mark Berninghausen
    Squeak Creek Apiaries



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