Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: emerging queen

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    cumberland me
    Posts
    223

    Default emerging queen

    I was helping a bee friend cut queen cells. Her primary hive has swarmed twice. The goal is to prevent future swarms. It is late in the season and she needs to recombine the two swarms with the primary hive and treat for mites.
    We left one queen cell in the primary hive. Another queen cell was opened at the end. Maybe this was yesterday's swarm which she caught. When we cut open one queen cell the queen flew up and around and circled our veils. Another queen cell was dark at the point where the queen cell is attached to the comb. I thought the queen had died inside the cell. I was wrong. She put the queen cell in a canning jar (lid pierce with air holes) along with pieces of sugar candy and a damp towel and one nurse bee. It was late when we finished cutting cells. I thought it would be a good idea to put the worker bee in with the queen cell. The queen emerged and now the queen is chasing the worker bee around the jar.
    The plan today is to recombine the two week old swarm with the primary hive. In two days we will recombine yesterday's swarm with the primary hive.
    What about this newly emerged queen?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    1,344

    Default Re: emerging queen

    Swarms are pretty rare this time of year in the north but do happen. I usually leave queen cells, sometimes I will use them to start nucs but don't tear them down.

    How many capped queen cells were present before you cut them down? How big were these "swarms"? What did the queens look like, tiny?

    Im guessing superseder.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    cumberland me
    Posts
    223

    Default Re: emerging queen

    The first swarm was about 6 lbs. The swarm flew up 30 feet into a pine tree. The wife saw the bees swarm. The second swarm was not as big but still about two lbs. We looked through the primary hive and we definitely need to combine. The primary hive are package bees that were installed the last day of May. I usually don't cut out queen cells. The concern was that the hive would keep throwing after- swarms.
    When I arrived the wife had the second swarm already boxed in a screened container. Could we have just shaken the swarm into the primary hive? Instead we put the swarm into two combined shallow honey supers with a makeshift bottom board, a makeshift inner cover and an outer cover. We were thinking we need to wait a couple of days before combining the 2nd swarm with the primary hive.
    I am going up late this afternoon to recombine the two week old swarm with the primary hive. I did not spot the queen in the primary hive. It was after 5 pm-too late to see eggs without some sort of light.
    There were 2 capped queen cells and one uncapped queen cells. I think I made a mistake cutting those queen cells, but I am thinking there is a queen in one of those swarms.
    Last edited by linn; 09-09-2013 at 03:28 PM. Reason: number of queen cells (2) plus 1 opened.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    cumberland me
    Posts
    223

    Default Re: emerging queen

    Can the two swarms and the main hive be combined in one day? The plan is to find the queens in the main hive and the two swarms. We will cage the three queens and put one caged queen in the bottom brood box of the main hive. We will put newspaper between the main hive and the first swarm (two shallows). Can we put newspaper between the second swarm and the first swarm? This will mean we are combining the second swarm with the first swarm and the combined first and second with the main hive (all in one day). What about the poor caged queen in the bottom deep with all this chaos overhead?
    Last edited by linn; 09-13-2013 at 04:22 PM. Reason: question mark

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    cumberland me
    Posts
    223

    Smile Re: emerging queen

    Please disregard the above question. I went to my local bee supplier to pick up some items. The beekeepers/shopkeepers said it was more than a one day project. We will follow their suggestions and combine the first swarm with the primary hive. We will decide which of the two queens to keep. In a week we will combine the second swarm with the combined hive. We will also follow their advice and use hopguard because of the new swarm queens. This is more than a weekend project.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Campbell River, BC, CA
    Posts
    482

    Default Re: emerging queen

    Quote Originally Posted by linn View Post
    Can the two swarms and the main hive be combined in one day?
    I tried that the first time I got a swarm from one of our hives. I shook them into a box from the limb of the tree, then poured them back into the hive they came from. It took about 3 minutes till they were all clustered on the tree again.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads