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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Mtn. View, Arkansas, USA
    Posts
    1,147

    Default 24 Hour Mite Fall with Hopguard

    I am treating my home yard with Hopguard and I just finished a count for the first 24 hours after the strips were put into the colonies. I only did a spot check using an average colony that was made from a nuc this spring. It has built to a deep and a medium with a moderate population with 7 deep frames and 4 medium frames of adult bees. This colony had a natural mite fall count of 54, an average of three 24 hour counts. The brood pattern is spotty and brood is only on three frames.

    The actual count of adult varroa dropped in the first 24 hours is 1193. This count makes me wish I had left the sticky board in for anothr day or two and counted the fall, it would have given me a better idea of how many mites were on the adult bees.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Laurel Hill, Fl
    Posts
    324

    Default Re: 24 Hour Mite Fall with Hopguard

    I'm didn't put a sticky board in mine when I treated this weekend. Wish I had, you went from 54 to 1193! I was about 150... I will be doing a count coming out of treatment in 42 days....
    I'm hoping to see very few. I'm going to compare it to two hives I'm treating with OA Vapor over the same time frame.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Mtn. View, Arkansas, USA
    Posts
    1,147

    Default Re: 24 Hour Mite Fall with Hopguard

    I have three colonies that were dropping 90+ in a 24 hour natural fall. I did not choose one of those because I have been told the natural fall number that would require treatment was 50, and I wanted to get an idea of how many mites would be in the colony. I have read that 30% of the mites are on adult bees and 70% are in the capped brood, but I don't think that can be true in this case. I don't think there is that much capped brood in the colony.

    I don't know if there is an accurate method to determine the mite population short of killing the colony and counting all of the dead mites. Perhaps someone with treating experience or training in mite populations can post and give us that information.

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