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Thread: fall help

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    fayette oh
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    11

    Default fall help

    Hi new bee keeper from northern Ohio. Its 9/11 and I need to medicate for AFB before winter. I have a very Strong packed hive consisting of two deeps and two medium supers. The temp is 96 today but its suppose to drop into the mid 60s next week. Both of my supers are 3/4 full of uncapped honey and I know I can't treat for AFB with them on. Should I skip the treatment and leave the two medium super on through winter. My hive is overly packed and I don't think all the bees will fit if I remove the supers, plus there almost full but no caps. The state inspector told me to leave the supers on for the winter due to my very large population but then i cant medicate. I'm a new keeper so i don't have another hive or any drawn comb to start a new hive. This late in the season i may get some more warm weather or it could start to change soon. I have no idea what to do. If i remove the super will the cram themselves in the bottom and tough it out, or should i leave the supers on and remove them in the spring for medication. There has been some FB in the area but mine inspected fine.Thank

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Athens, OH
    Posts
    2,668

    Default Re: fall help

    Are you sure you really want to put antibiotics in your hive? If you feel like you just have to do something, treat for mites.
    Politics is the entertainment branch of industry. -Frank Zappa

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    fayette oh
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    11

    Default Re: fall help

    I dont want to. From my reading i thought it was normal.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Athens, OH
    Posts
    2,668

    Default Re: fall help

    Some do. I would burn mine first.
    Politics is the entertainment branch of industry. -Frank Zappa

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    649

    Default Re: fall help

    If yours inspected fine, no need to medicate for AFB.

    Take the two mediums and extract. From my experience, honey tends to crystalize in the comb and it can not be extracted in the spring. Test for moisture if you can get access to a refractometer. Extract and put it the freezer if you are unsure. Leave it in the freezer until you want to use it. It takes no harm being frozen and will not crystalize.

    Sample for mites and treat if required. Otherwise, I say treat them for mites.

    The bees will fit and organize themselves.

    Then make 2:1 syrup and feed beginning about Oct 1. The bees will fill any empty cells. This should be your feeding focus.

    Put on a feeder rim of 2-3 inches in depth. Drill a a 5/8 inch hole at front. Feed wetted sugar on top of frames covered in s sheet of news paper(Mountain camp method) or fondant or make a candy board, starting Christmas. This item is just an insurance measure but I'd recommend it for a new bee keeper. This item may only be a further $10 of cost.

    Check with other bee keepers in your area and make windbreaks, insulate, wrap, close off screen bottom boards, provide minimal but adeqate ventilation. Too much moisture inside the hive and dripping on bees is deadly.
    If you always do what you always did, you'll always get what you always got!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    fayette oh
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    Default Re: fall help

    Thank you

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Taylor County, Georgia, USA
    Posts
    713

    Default Re: fall help

    I can't comment on wintering in Ohio because I don't live there. However, treating for AFB is an exercise in futility. A lot of beekeepers do it as a prophylactic treatment...there might be a good reason, but I don't know what it is.

    If you have AFB, nothing will get rid of it except a lighter and gasoline. Tylan and terramycin are expensive and will kill off a lot of good bacteria as well. They will not, however, kill the spores. The spores stick around and reinfect the hive.

    I think cg3 had the best post. If you really feel like you need to do something, treat for mites. They are a much larger threat to your bees than AFB.
    Try it. What could happen?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Central Oregon
    Posts
    41

    Default Re: fall help

    I think you are getting good advice. Why treat if you don't actually have the problem. Treating will likely cause an imbalance in the hive ecology and may actually cause the very problem you are trying to prevent or some other problem.

    When a person takes antibiotics, they are likely to get a yeast infection because the antibiotics killed the good bacteria that was keeping things in check. Just something to think about as you make your decision.

  9. #9

    Default Re: fall help

    Did you try the shake test on the frames if nothing came out I would pull and Extract.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Manning, SC
    Posts
    2,084

    Default Re: fall help

    Quote Originally Posted by JStinson View Post
    I think cg3 had the best post. If you really feel like you need to do something, treat for
    mites. They are a much larger threat to your bees than AFB.
    You (IMO) are absolutely correct. You want mite free hives heading into winter. Mites are the number one cause of colony demise. Pick a treatment plan and then treat!
    http://OxaVap.com
    Your source for Oxalic Acid Vaporizers

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Knox, Pa. USA
    Posts
    1,258

    Default Re: fall help

    You never gave us a clear description of your hive configuration. However, for some reason I get the impression that you have a single deep brood box with a super on it, Or maybe you are referring to the upper brood chamber as a super because the queen has not used it for brood. In any event Regardless of what you have if you are in northern Ohio you will most likely need a two deep configuration to winter. Now do not fret if you have one deep and a medium, or even a shallow. the bees have a good chance with that. but you have to leave it for them, if you have an excluder on it must be removed so the queen can use the upper box also. You are in the midst of a good flow right now and the girls will have no trouble filling the upper box. In Fact if 80% of the frames are drawn in that super I would add another. They may not fill it, but the drawn frames will come in handy later.
    I kept hives In Ashtabula right on the lake for many years you cannot get anymore north in Ohio than that.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    fayette oh
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    11

    Default Re: fall help

    I have two deep broods and two medium supers. Im in fayette oh just outside wauseon

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Knox, Pa. USA
    Posts
    1,258

    Default Re: fall help

    sied172. If you have two suppers each #/4 full of uncapped honey, that would be an indication that the two deeps are also full of stores surrounding the brood As a general rule that would be ample supplies for a hive, in Ohio. You are still in the midst of a goldenrod flow, and the bees will most likely fill the remainder of the supers. weather they cap them is anybody's guess, however with decreasing humidity that we usually have this time of year, I would say chances are good. in about 3 weeks I would inspect the hive no need to completely disassemble the entire thing, Just remove the supers, and split the boxes. if they weigh about 70 pounds a piece then I would harvest the honey. You should have enough to winter. If in doubt leave one or two suppers for insurance.
    As far as treating for AFB, if you do not have it don't treat.. Who is your inspector

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