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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    Alachua County, FL, USA
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    Default Florida beekeepers and citrus growers will meet September 18 in Lake Alfred

    Florida beekeepers and citrus growers will meet September 18 in Lake Alfred over potential bee pesticide exposure in citrus groves.
    Citrus Grower – Beekeeper Meeting
    September 18, 2013
    Auditorium, Citrus Research and Education Center
    700 Experiment Station Road
    Lake Alfred, FL

    9:30 – 9:50 AM
    Registration

    9:50 – 10:00 AM
    Introductions Andy Rackley, FDACS

    10:00 – 10:30 AM
    Purpose and Mission Adam Putnam, Commissioner, FDACS

    10:30- 11:30 AM
    Panel: Facing Challenges, Finding Solutions Facilitated by FDACS

    Citrus Grower Ben McLean III, Uncle Matt’s Organic
    Beekeeper (TBD)
    Citrus Research/Extension Michael Rogers, Ph.D., UF/IFAS
    Apiary Research/Extension Jamie Ellis, Ph.D., UF/IFAS

    11:30 – 12:00 PM
    Panel Questions and Answers Facilitated by FDACS

    12:00 – 1:00 PM
    Lunch

    1:00 PM to 1:15 PM
    Pollinator Protection Stewardship Programs TBD, CropLife America

    1:15 PM – 2:00 PM
    Best Management Practices: Breakout Groups Facilitated by FDACS

    2:00-2:15 PM
    Break

    2:15 – 3:00 PM
    BMP Exercise Summary and Next Steps Facilitated by FDACS
    americasbeekeeper.com
    beekeeper@americasbeekeeper.com

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Essex IA USA
    Posts
    34

    Default Re: Florida beekeepers and citrus growers will meet September 18 in Lake Alfred

    Good luck! I hope there is progress.

  3. #3
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    Jan 2010
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    Alachua County, FL, USA
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    Default Re: Florida beekeepers and citrus growers will meet September 18 in Lake Alfred

    State officials hope to avert a civil war between the citrus industry, one of Florida's largest agricultural commodities, and beekeepers, one of its smallest farm sectors. Florida Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam, also a citrus grower, said he hoped both groups, working with scientists, could come up with a solution to the problem.
    LAKE ALFRED | State officials hope to avert a civil war between the citrus industry, one of Florida's largest agricultural commodities, and beekeepers, one of its smallest farm sectors.
    At issue is the increasing use of pesticides in Florida's commercial citrus groves that growers see as crucial in the battle against an existential threat, the fatal bacterial disease citrus greening, but which many beekeepers worry is killing millions of their insects.
    Florida Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam, also a citrus grower, said he hoped both groups, working with scientists, could come up with a solution to the problem. He spoke to about 150 participants at a recent meeting at the Citrus Research and Education Center in Lake Alfred to start a dialogue between the two agricultural communities.
    More than one science will come into play, said Andy Rackley, director of the Division of Agricultural Environmental Services at the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, where Putnam is the chief executive.
    "Inevitably, political science gets involved in this. It's not in our interests to let this become a political issue," said Rackley, noting the bee-pesticide debate goes beyond state lines. "The eyes of regulatory agencies on a national basis are watching us. It's going to require some sacrifices."
    http://www.theledger.com/article/201...ver-Pesticides
    americasbeekeeper.com
    beekeeper@americasbeekeeper.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Stafford, Virginia
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    296

    Default Re: Florida beekeepers and citrus growers will meet September 18 in Lake Alfred

    I am not sure why there would be a civil war. I just touched base with our grower and we will be returning next year. Probably drop off some Nucs in Feb just before we send bees to Cali. We are fortunate enough to have great communication with our grower and I hope it remains that way. It is a small place with only 4000 acres but enough for our bees.

  5. #5
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    Alachua County, FL, USA
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    Default Re: Florida beekeepers and citrus growers will meet September 18 in Lake Alfred

    This is one of the items that came out of the meetings --

    Commercial Citrus Production and Alternative Bee Forage - Online MapThe Department has developed an online map to help inform beekeepers in making decisions on where to locate hives in citrus producing counties and to provide locations of alternative bee forage. This interactive online map illustrates the locations of:

    •Commercial citrus land use, in general;
    •Commercial citrus groves where all of the trees are 1-5 years old (planted since 2007). Some of these areas may be treated with soil applied neonicotinoids that could pose risk to foraging bees if citrus blossoms are present (note: significant blossoming occurs in trees 3-5 years old);
    •Boundaries of Citrus Health Management Areas (CHMAs);
    •Boundaries of Apiary Inspection Districts

    ••http://www.freshfromflorida.com/Divi...apping-Service

    By clicking this ArcGIS Online Link, you will access a map showing the location of commercial citrus land-use (grey and black). You also can see reset citrus groves (black) that were planted in their entirety after 2007. Trees in these reset blocks can range from 1-5 years old. Reset trees that are 3-5 years old can blossom and may pose risks to foraging bees if they were treated with soil-applied neonicotinoids prior to blossoming.
    Please be aware that many young citrus resets are not planted as solid zones (as depicted in black on the map). Instead, many groves may have young reset trees interspersed among mature trees (trees that are greater 9 feet tall). In these mixed blocks, as the relative number of trees that are 3-5 years old increases, the potential for risks to bees from exposure to neonicotinoids in flowers may also increase.
    The online map also provides alternative bee forage areas derived from Florida Cooperative Land Cover Map, Version 2.3 (FNAI 2012). Habitat was selected based on habitat descriptions found in the Guide to the Natural Communities of Florida 2010 Edition. Major honey bee nectar plants (Sanford 2003) and their bloom period are listed below:

    Citrus February - April

    Gallberry March - May

    Ogeechee Tupelo* April - May

    Saw Palmetto April - July

    Cabbage Palm June - July

    Black Mangrove June - July

    Melaleuca# August (variable)

    Brazilian Peppers# August - October
    americasbeekeeper.com
    beekeeper@americasbeekeeper.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    lee county, fl, usa
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    884

    Default Re: Florida beekeepers and citrus growers will meet September 18 in Lake Alfred

    That map is great! I knew of an orange grove about a mile from my hives, but according to the map there's another less than 1/2 mile.

    I have another area where I have a chance to put some hives and I was hesitant because I didn't know what was in the area for forage. The map indicates it should be a good spot.

    Thanks so much for posting the information. I'm going to get my apiary registered through the site. My hives are state registered but their location is not on the map.
    Pleasant words are a honeycomb, sweet to the soul and healing to the bones. Prvb 16:24
    March 2010; +/- 30 hives, TF

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Indian River, Florida
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    232

    Default Re: Florida beekeepers and citrus growers will meet September 18 in Lake Alfred

    Not much good has come out of the Lake Alfred meeting, Neonics are still being sprayed at an alarming rate. Grove owners are not allowing beeks back in their groves, just ask me. After being hit with Neonics twice in nine months I can assure you that the map is useless. Will it stop grove owners from spraying this deadly chemical at rates that are startling ? Recently the results came back that showed my bees were poisoned with one of the highest rates of Neonics recorded in bee kills. What difference would the map make?? I think the best thing AES can do is post a sign on the highway around the I4 corridor that states , "You Are Entering The Killing Zone". Anything south of I4 should be entered at your own risk!!!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Stafford, Virginia
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    296

    Default Re: Florida beekeepers and citrus growers will meet September 18 in Lake Alfred

    Broodhead, I was surprised the hoops I had to go through to be allowed back into the citrus groves this year. I sat for over an hour with the grower as he explained the plight of greening disease. Seems several are in a serious pickle down there.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Indian River, Florida
    Posts
    232

    Default Re: Florida beekeepers and citrus growers will meet September 18 in Lake Alfred

    You may not be so lucky to be back in the groves. If you knew what was going on in regard to the amount of neonics that were being applied you might just change your mind and go elsewhere to protect your bees. My case is still being reviewed by AES and it will be interesting how they determine how my bees were so poisoned at the distance they were from the grove. A few know this event and are anxiously awaiting the results, lawyering up may be the only resolve, most everyone is in denial.
    It puzzles me that citrus greening is a virus that has infected 75% of the trees in the state and they are spending millions to treat those already infected. Seems like being penny smart and dollar dumb. I feel for the citrus industry, but these neonics are showing up in some very suspect places. Researchers need funding to resolve this issue, it wiped out citrus in other places of the world I suppose Florida growers are fighting a losing battle. In fighting this crisis honeybees are being wiped out at alarming rates.

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Florida beekeepers and citrus growers will meet September 18 in Lake Alfred

    Beekeepers are struggling to protect their hives from the pesticides being used to combat citrus greening. Citrus greening is the common name for Huanglongbing, a bacterial disease in citrus trees spread by an insect known as the Asian citrus psyllid, or jumping plant louse. A tree infected with citrus greening produces bitter, hard fruit that is unsellable in the citrus industry. (WUFT) http://www.wuft.org/news/2014/03/13/...lems-for-bees/
    americasbeekeeper.com
    beekeeper@americasbeekeeper.com

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