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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Stevents Point, WI
    Posts
    30

    Default Fall Prep and such

    This is the first fall we'll be going into with our bees...

    Once the goldenrod flow is over, I believe we need to feed our bees ... 2 parts sugar to 1 part water.
    I bought an internal frame feeder and will put in the top brood box, and will have to remove 2 of the existing frames that are in there to accomodate that feeder.
    Is it OK to just pull out those 2 frames as they will most likely have honey or something, perhaps even brood?, in them? If we do pull them out, do we leave them
    out by the hive so the bees can remove what they can salvage from them?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Washington County, Maine
    Posts
    2,963

    Default Re: Fall Prep and such

    Outside frames should not have any brood so you should be ok. Stick the frames in your freezer and thaw them out prior to pulling the feeder for winter. When you take the feeder out the frames go back in the hive.

    If you were planning to leave the feeder in year round, than let the bees clean up the frames.
    Master Beekeeper (EAS) and Master Gardener (U Maine CE) www.beeberrywoods.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    1,632

    Default Re: Fall Prep and such

    Quote Originally Posted by jhrusky View Post
    This is the first fall we'll be going into with our bees...Once the goldenrod flow is over, I believe we need to feed our bees ... 2 parts sugar to 1 part water.
    Only if necessary. I would not feed just for the hell of it. Only if you think they need it, poor flow, drought, early frost, etc.

    I concur with dewey, but I don't like frame feeders, too much drowning. I prefer large jars, cans or buckets in an empty box ontop frames. I have 2 of 8 hives with brood on the outside frames on one side. Sort of unusually, but not uncommon.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Evansville, IN
    Posts
    2,567

    Default Re: Fall Prep and such

    Check the weight of your hive by lifting the rear with the cutout hand-hold. If you can lift it with one hand, it needs feeding. If you have to strain, it's probably OK, and if you cannot budge it, they are set.

    How many frames of what size contain honey? You will likely need a full deep of honey on top of a deep with brood, honey, and pollen before October. Feed to get that top box completely full and the brood nest backfilled if they don't do it themselves.

    I prefer a hive top feeder, like the one Kelley's bees sells. Easier, no need to open the hive to fill, no drowning so long as you have the top cover on tight, and no need to disturb the frames or move things around. Holds 4 gallons, so you only have to fill it a few times.

    Peter

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Stevents Point, WI
    Posts
    30

    Default Re: Fall Prep and such

    How do the bees get to the syrup on that one? The smaller one (1.5 gal capacity) appears to be where they can get to the syrup from the bottom but this one doesn't look like that unless it's just not visible in the picture.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Morgan ,Kentucky, USA
    Posts
    171

    Default Re: Fall Prep and such

    Your good to go on the frame feeder. I have used everything. Feeders are like mite treatments. Each has its place with negatives and positives. Top feeders are good and easy to fill and hold a lot but if the tops are a little warpy, or the styrofoam ones the ants and yjackets eat an enterance, robbing takes place. Frame feeders, especially the new ribbed sided ones, are a good way to get lots of food to lots of bees quick. Takes up a frame or so, and may have a little drowning. Trow in a couple of sticks for floats. If buying they cost a third or more less.

    Paint cans are good but require an extra deep. Jars are good but require lots of trips. Bags good for 2:1 but are risky spilling for me.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Evansville, IN
    Posts
    2,567

    Default Re: Fall Prep and such

    The Kelley feeder is a molded plastic insert in a shallow box. The center is raised, to divide the feeder into two compartments with sloping bottoms, and there is a metal mesh over the divider. There is a slot in the divider, so the bees can climb up and over the edge and down to the liquid on both sides. They can also use the screen, and since there is only a narrow gap between feeder body and screen, little or no drowning while allowing lots of bees access.

    The top is flat, so a decent cover will seal it up bee proof. No robbing, and the bees cannot reach you through the screen when you re-fill it. Just pop the top off and pour in. Very handy, and since it holds 2 gallon per side, perfect for feeding a colony so long as it's warm enough.

    The best part is that you do not have to move things around in the hive, just slap it on top and take it off when finished feeding. No moving frames out, no need to store them, and the hive stays closed due to the screen when the top is off.

    A division feeder will work better when it's very cold, though, because the syrup will be warmer. However, under those conditions it's probably better to use a candy board.

    Peter

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Red bluff, CA USA
    Posts
    33

    Default Re: Fall Prep and such

    I have frame feeders for my hives. In order to prevent too many bees from drowning I put zigzagged chicken wire inside of them. It gives them something to hold on to and climb up on!! I still get at least 1 or 2 dead ones in there but not as many as I did without it by far!

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