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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Amherst Virginia USA
    Posts
    146

    Default Re: Land Managment for your bees

    linden poplar and fruit trees...borage and clover goldenrod and asters
    Last edited by wengeasley; 09-05-2013 at 02:30 PM.
    I love my honey bees!

  2. #22
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    paulding Georgia USA
    Posts
    152

    Default Re: Land Managment for your bees

    My bees seem to like clover, so I probably would plant some white dutch, sweet yellow and crimson clovers. Because I like the way it looks and it has a fairly long booming cycle, I would plant some borage also.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    steeds, north carolina, USA
    Posts
    66

    Default Re: Land Managment for your bees

    Tulip poplar is a very good source of nectar here. It is our largest spring flow and produces very good honey.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Kingston, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    271

    Default Re: Land Managment for your bees

    Mustard, very early pollen and nectar source.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Tulsa, OK
    Posts
    86

    Default Re: Land Managment for your bees

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Bush View Post
    Tulip poplar is a very good nectar source. Lombardy poplar is not, but it makes a lot of propolis as does cottonwood, aspen and all the rest of the poplar family. Black locust is a big honey producer. Honey locust, oddly enough, is not.
    How did the Tulip Poplar do on your previous land? Planted 3 in NE Oklahoma, couldn't keep any of them alive.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,341

    Default Re: Land Managment for your bees

    >How did the Tulip Poplar do on your previous land? Planted 3 in NE Oklahoma, couldn't keep any of them alive.

    I have clay soil (as most of Oklahoma does as well). On the advice of someone smarter about such things as me, I dug a hole like 3' wide and 3' deep and filled it with a mixture of purchased top soil, potting soil and shredded pine bark. Then I had to water consistently for the first couple of years. They are doing very well.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Brazoria, TX
    Posts
    34

    Default Re: Land Managment for your bees

    Your forest patch will have its own group of flowering plants - those will supplement the wild flowers and crops on your neighbors land. Here in TX I have blackberry (late spring) wild grape (early summer) and trumpet vine (mid and late-summer) in my woodlot - certainly you will have other species. I have the bees on the northeast side of the trees, so they get shade at in the afternoon, and can go either into the woods or on the meadow.

    The plants in the woods may also have some protection from drought. Also, the brush would make a good wind break for the hives in winter.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Veedersburg, IN
    Posts
    3

    Default Organic matter cover cropping and bee forage

    I'm trying to build up the organic material in my soil and generally improve its fertility while providing as much bee forage as possible. Any suggestion? I assume probably sweet clover or a mix of clover, probably ryegrass, its clay and could use some breaking up so maybe forage radish in some qty, I want to get as much biomass as possible so I'll be cutting it and removing material to composts piles so I don't think Sainfoin would be a good choice. I don't have much experience with Sainfoin but Dadant calls it a multi cropped legume while other sources say it is a once a year harvest crop, seeming contradictions. I also have about 12 acres I could plant some more perinieal forage and though that's of secondary importance at the moment I'd be interested in suggestion about that as well. FYI I'm in SW Ohio.

    Anybody have any experience with different Basswood Tree types? I keep hearing about bee bee trees but they are considered an invasive species in a number of states including here so I intend to stay away from them.

    Wyatt

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    967

    Default Re: Organic matter cover cropping and bee forage

    I've used rye/clover planted in November and incorporated after seed heads form on the rye (prevents grow-back...cut before the seed is viable) with success to both choke weeds and build organic matter in upstate NY.
    The tilth improvement was huge.

    Getting multiple crops with a particular species (and how many cycles) will depend a lot on location/ growing season length.

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