Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst ... 345
Results 81 to 99 of 99
  1. #81
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    DFW area, TX, USA
    Posts
    1,059

    Default Re: "What is Varroa good for?"

    Quote Originally Posted by WLC View Post
    sqkcrk:

    We know a lot about Varroa. And, there's more on the way.

    By the way, it's the viruses with which Varroa can infect Honeybees that are the real killer.

    DWV really has me concerned since I learned that it has jumped species into the common eastern bumblebee.
    I was wondering about that just yesterday........How long will it take the bees to develop some kind of immunity to the dozen or so viruses vectored by the varroa mite in the hive?
    Last edited by Lburou; 12-05-2013 at 03:53 PM.
    LeeB
    I try to learn from my mistakes, and from yours when you give me a heads up :)

  2. #82
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Auckland,Auckland,New Zealand
    Posts
    5,993

    Default Re: "What is Varroa good for?"

    Personally, I think a very long time.

    Be aware these viruses are not new to bees they have been with bees since time immemorial, and bees have not defeated them, they have just lived with them & kept the effects (mostly) low. Just, things are worse now cos these viruses are being injected directly into bees en mass, by varroa mites.

    It has been shown there can be thousands, or even a million times more of these viruses in a hive that is badly infected with varroa, than a hive with negligible varroa. which means a much greater pool of viruses for new variants etc to be selected from, and in theory, gives advantage in the arms race, to the viruses.
    44 years, been commercial, outfits up to 4000 hives, now 120 hives and 200 nucs as a hobby, selling bees. T (mostly).

  3. #83
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    DFW area, TX, USA
    Posts
    1,059

    Default Re: "What is Varroa good for?"

    Quote Originally Posted by Oldtimer View Post
    Personally, I think a very long time.......
    I'm sorry to say I think you are correct Oldtimer, and I must say, always enjoy and respect your posts here.

    So, what has the Russian honeybee done to accommodate the mites, has anything been demonstrated scientifically?
    LeeB
    I try to learn from my mistakes, and from yours when you give me a heads up :)

  4. #84
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,121

    Default Re: "What is Varroa good for?"

    >So, what has the Russian honeybee done to accommodate the mites

    Probably gather more propolis... the bees don't have much of an immune system. They borrow theirs from the plants...
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  5. #85
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    jackson county, alabama, usa
    Posts
    4,531

    Default Re: "What is Varroa good for?"

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Bush View Post
    >So, what has the Russian honeybee done to accommodate the mites

    Probably gather more propolis... the bees don't have much of an immune system. They borrow theirs from the plants...
    interesting. in the short time i've had with just a few hives i've noticed that my strongest and most productive colonies also are heavy propolizers, and just the opposite for the weaker/nonproductive ones.
    journaling the growth of a treatment free apiary started in 2010. 20+/- hives

  6. #86
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Cleveland, OH, USA
    Posts
    475

    Default Re: "What is Varroa good for?"

    Quote Originally Posted by imthegrumpyone View Post
    What ever happen to "Only the strong survive" ? And how did bees survive all these centuries with our intervention ?
    Well, "only the strong" is a bit of an oversimplification. I don't suppose many would think white-tail deer are stronger than, say, grey wolves; but presently the deer are over-populated, and the wolves are mostly all gone. Does "only the strong" ever stop you from taking your dog or cat to the vet when they're sick or injured?

    Bees and humans go back a couple thousand years; we've had a direct hand in their genetic development all that time, and have personally carried them from their natural ranges to every corner of the world. People and bees are serious BFF's. It's human nature to try and look out for our friends, as it were.
    Beeless since 2012; coming back in 2014. Suffering from apicultural withdrawal!

  7. #87
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,121

    Default Re: "What is Varroa good for?"

    >Does "only the strong" ever stop you from taking your dog or cat to the vet when they're sick or injured?

    It would if you were trying to help the species.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  8. #88
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    St. Albans, Vermont
    Posts
    5,379

    Default Re: "What is Varroa good for?"

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Bush View Post
    >So, what has the Russian honeybee done to accommodate the mites

    Probably gather more propolis... the bees don't have much of an immune system. They borrow theirs from the plants...
    What about their huge propensity to swarm?

  9. #89
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    St. Albans, Vermont
    Posts
    5,379

    Default Re: "What is Varroa good for?"

    Webster claims that infestation by varroa is a great thing. Makes our bees better bees.

    Whatever

  10. #90
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    27,086

    Default Re: "What is Varroa good for?"

    Kirk, not Merriam, I assume.
    Mark Berninghausen #youmatter

  11. #91
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    DFW area, TX, USA
    Posts
    1,059

    Default Re: "What is Varroa good for?"

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Palmer View Post
    What about their huge propensity to swarm?
    It would seem pretty hard to refute that conclusion.
    LeeB
    I try to learn from my mistakes, and from yours when you give me a heads up :)

  12. #92
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    cumberland me
    Posts
    230

    Default Re: "What is Varroa good for?"

    I saw two bees "fighting" on a landing board this summer. One bee was biting the other bee on the thorax. The bees separated. The bee being bitten on the thorax returned to the other bee. Was this a display of grooming or something else? The concept of hygienic behavior in regards to mites is interesting-especially if this is done outside of the hive. The guard bee could have easily not let the mite ridden bee enter.

  13. #93
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Cleveland, OH, USA
    Posts
    475

    Default Re: "What is Varroa good for?"

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Palmer View Post
    Webster claims that infestation by varroa is a great thing. Makes our bees better bees.

    Whatever
    Mr. Webster is welcome to have the betterest bees of all if that's what he wants.
    Beeless since 2012; coming back in 2014. Suffering from apicultural withdrawal!

  14. #94
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Gainesboro, Tennessee, USA.
    Posts
    398

    Default Re: "What is Varroa good for?"

    Well in nature when pressures occur like varroa this results in the dying of all the weak stock. It breeds a better bee by selection. Just like using some chemical control can make resistant mites that are tougher over a time.

    Beekeepers are still breeding weak bees in the eyes of nature. Face it our bees have a crutch.

  15. #95

    Default Re: "What is Varroa good for?"

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Bush View Post
    >What is the natural predator of Varroa?

    Pseudo scorpions.
    Really? You mean those 3-5mm long insects with scissors?

    These was recently a public query for people by one scientist to tell all pseudo scorpion discoveries. I e-mailed her to tell that in our house there is living one species. She was actually looking for those living out in the forests...
    Treatment free, honey production, isolation mated queens, www.saunalahti.fi/lunden/varroakertomus.html

  16. #96
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Otero County, New Mexico, USA
    Posts
    1,388

    Default Re: "What is Varroa good for?"

    Juhani, we have some out here in the desert that are about 3 inches long, tan, and totally evil. I would NOT want them in my hives or anywhere near them. Not sure they would go for varroa, they would probably just eat all the bees, like the black widows and scorpions do. Evil creatures, not quite "centipede" evil, but evil none-the-less.
    NM desert/mountain beekeeper - Black Mesa Honeybees.

  17. #97
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Grosse Ile, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    2,863

    Default Re: "What is Varroa good for?"

    Quote Originally Posted by Kamon Reynolds View Post
    Well in nature when pressures occur like varroa this results in the dying of all the weak stock. It breeds a better bee by selection. Just like using some chemical control can make resistant mites that are tougher over a time.

    Beekeepers are still breeding weak bees in the eyes of nature. Face it our bees have a crutch.
    Amen.

  18. #98
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,121

    Default Re: "What is Varroa good for?"

    >Really? You mean those 3-5mm long insects with scissors?

    Yes.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  19. #99
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Cleveland, OH, USA
    Posts
    475

    Default Re: "What is Varroa good for?"

    Quote Originally Posted by Kamon Reynolds View Post
    Well in nature when pressures occur like varroa this results in the dying of all the weak stock. It breeds a better bee by selection.
    And sometimes in nature the "weak stock" is so much of the overall stock that the "better" stock that remains is less than the species' minimum viable population, so the entire species all dies anyway.

    Other times in nature, species survive by depending on other, completely different species for various things - protection, reproduction, or what-not. Many flowering plants cannot survive at all unless insects pollinate them, for one extremely potent example. With bees specifically, Michael Bush has provided an exceptional example above - bees, largely lacking immuno-defenses of their own, gather propolis from trees and plants to perform an antibiotic and antiseptic role in their own hives.

    Humans are capable of similar interactions. I am persistently mystified by the inability of so many people to understand or concede that humans, as a naturally-evolved and existing species on Earth, is capable of entering into symbiotic relationships with other species - or that such relationships can be anything other than parasitic and harmful to the non-human actor. What nonsense. For instance, there are what's considered "beneficial" bacteria within our bodies that take a minute amount of the food we eat, and in exchange secrete chemicals our body uses, or which predate other more harmful microorganisms that we would have trouble dealing with otherwise.

    Our working to control varroa mites and other bee diseases in exchange for using the excess honey, wax, or other products that bees produce, is just another example of this kind of relationship. It is veridically no different from bees using saps and fluids from plants to act as their exo-immune system. In a world where they could talk, would you counsel plants to stop giving bees the materials with which they make propolis, in the hopes that the bees would evolve their own better internal immunological machinery and survive without the plants' help? Would you counsel the bees to stop eating pollen and let those lazy flowers learn how to reproduce on their own?
    Beeless since 2012; coming back in 2014. Suffering from apicultural withdrawal!

Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst ... 345

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads