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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Palm Bay, FL
    Posts
    124

    Default This is interesting...

    Mike Harrell
    Zone 9B - First Hive April 17, 2014

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Pope, AR, USA
    Posts
    178

    Default Re: This is interesting...

    Since it says mites completely die off at only 110 that explains why the bees in Tucson Arizona at Dee Lusby's apiaries survive treatment free. It might not be small cell after all, it might be the 115 degree temps they get every year. Thanks for teaching me that 110 high temps kill mites but not bee brood!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Sacramento, California
    Posts
    151

    Default Re: This is interesting...

    So how long do I have to bake my hives to get rid of these pesky varoa?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Campbell River, BC, CA
    Posts
    834

    Default Re: This is interesting...

    The article says beekeepers manage mites by putting frames in an oven for an hour .

    I've never heard of that before. I'm questioning everything in the article .

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Park City Ky
    Posts
    2,058

    Default Re: This is interesting...

    This would be easy enough to test and verify.

    1. Do a mite count on a couple of hives.

    2. Place hives in a heated environment at 110 degrees for one hour.

    3. Do another mite count, with a followup mite count to see if mites were killed.

    4. Compare mite count results.

    cchoganjr

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Marshall county, AL
    Posts
    1,220

    Default Re: This is interesting...

    Quote Originally Posted by grozzie2 View Post
    The article says beekeepers manage mites by putting frames in an oven for an hour .

    I've never heard of that before. I'm questioning everything in the article .
    It clearly states, that: "Its well known in beekeeping circles that a certain temperature will sterilize the mite eggs prior to fertilization without harming the bee eggs."

    I can't believe you didn't know that. It's well known.







    I didn't know it either.
    The more I learn about bees, the less I know.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Clifford Township, PA
    Posts
    2,133

    Default Re: This is interesting...

    Learned lots from that article. All beekeepers only run a single brood box and all use queen excluders. Learned our frames are replaced with new ones after 3 or so years. Learned that "mitelets" hatching in the cells "eat all the food so that, when the bees hatch, there’s none left, and they starve." Learned that we bake our frames (presumably with brood?) for an hour in our oven to kill mites.

    Funny that someone mentioned Dee Lusby. Right in the very pages of Beesource, there is a series of articles by Dee, one of which talks about temperatures in the hive.

    "With an internal ambient temperature of approximately 106 degrees F both bees and brood die without some measures of heat regulation."
    http://www.beesource.com/point-of-vi...ield-part-4-2/

    I'm not really sure how my bees will be able to regulate the heat without learning to use the controls of my gas oven.

    I'm not really so negative about the prospects for this invention. I'm hoping that article was just the result of a writer unfamiliar enough with beekeeping to present the invention so unconvincingly. Perhaps someone with an actual knowledge of beekeeping and the product will present something more informative.

    I took a quick look at their web page. I see that the product is expected to be commercially available in the fall of this year.

    I see also that they use a positive quote from Marla Spivak about their invention. Someone should warn her that SNL is going to accuse her of of actively "promoting" the product simply for saying something positive about it.

    Hopefully, some positive results will come from this. We can use all the help we can get and plugging in a single frame will be less work than a series of OA applications.

    Might work. "Mitenot."

    Wayne
    Last edited by waynesgarden; 05-18-2015 at 07:45 PM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    48,591

    Default Re: This is interesting...

    >Since it says mites completely die off at only 110 that explains why the bees in Tucson Arizona at Dee Lusby's apiaries survive treatment free.

    Actually since the bees keep the brood nest 93 F no matter how hot it gets outside, it explains nothing about Dee Lusby's bees... Humidity is much more likely to be a factor than temperature. Humidity varies as the bees use it to cool the hive. You start with dry air but it gets pretty high humidity if the bees have to cool the air... So it's harder to predict on a given day what the humidity in a brood nest would be. The temperature is pretty predictable.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Herrick, SD USA
    Posts
    5,033

    Default Re: This is interesting...

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Bush View Post
    >Since it says mites completely die off at only 110 that explains why the bees in Tucson Arizona at Dee Lusby's apiaries survive treatment free.

    Actually since the bees keep the brood nest 93 F no matter how hot it gets outside, it explains nothing about Dee Lusby's bees...
    This may be true through evaporative cooling or it may not. It is an interesting theory, though and one that could be easily proven or disproven with an electronic indoor/outdoor type of thermometer that records high and low temps. I sort of have my doubts that 93 can always be maintained in prolonged periods of intense heat.
    "People will generally accept facts as truth only if the facts agree with what they already believe."- Andy Rooney

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Pope, AR, USA
    Posts
    178

    Default Re: This is interesting...

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Bush View Post
    >Since it says mites completely die off at only 110 that explains why the bees in Tucson Arizona at Dee Lusby's apiaries survive treatment free.

    Actually since the bees keep the brood nest 93 F no matter how hot it gets outside, it explains nothing about Dee Lusby's bees... Humidity is much more likely to be a factor than temperature. Humidity varies as the bees use it to cool the hive. You start with dry air but it gets pretty high humidity if the bees have to cool the air... So it's harder to predict on a given day what the humidity in a brood nest would be. The temperature is pretty predictable.
    Humidity? The brood temperature is only maintained in the core of the brood nest. ALL drones and bees that fly outside the hives will be subject to the 110 and lose all clinging mites. If the heat wave is predictably each year for long periods as it is every summer in Arizona's southern desert it would a phoeretic mite treatment that prevents even drifting bees and drones from even infecting hives with new mites from other hives.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Clifford Township, PA
    Posts
    2,133

    Default Re: This is interesting...

    Is there much honeybee activity in the Arizona desert when temps reach 110 other than maybe water gatherers?

    Wayne

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Pope, AR, USA
    Posts
    178

    Default Re: This is interesting...

    Quote Originally Posted by waynesgarden View Post
    Is there much honeybee activity in the Arizona desert when temps reach 110 other than maybe water gatherers?

    Wayne
    I doubt any bees would be out except drones in the afternoon heat. The intense heat probably affects an enormous area in the southwest preventing mite transfer and the water gatherers probably work overtime speaking of "humidity".

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