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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Navajo County,AZ
    Posts
    4

    Default Africanized bees

    I want to talk to people who have had experience with or studied Afrcanized bees at all. I am in AZ and deal with them alot but would still like to start a discussion and think tank here about them.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    belmont,Mississippi,USA
    Posts
    29

    Default Re: Africanized bees

    I'd like to hear about this, myself. I'm still hopeful that our temperatures and rainfall are enough like the AHB's stopping point in Argentina that they may never make it here. But, it would be nice to know how to deal with them. Just in case.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    140

    Default Re: Africanized bees

    If you do an archives search you will be occupied for days on AHB threads with some very good information.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Orange Grove, TX
    Posts
    13

    Default Re: Africanized bees

    Quote Originally Posted by hillbeekeeper View Post
    But, it would be nice to know how to deal with them. Just in case.
    Cowhide or rubber gloves, no goat skin gloves. Full suit, like Mann Lake's vented that they cannot sting through. Pretty much good to go, oh and warn everyone within 3-600 yards.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    5,408

    Default Re: Africanized bees

    I work diligently to keep my apiaries as free from AHB influence as I possibly can.

    I have been very successful at virtually eliminating excessive defensiveness. Colonies that exhibit that trait (I promptly destroy their queens, then distribute their resources). Though I still have a few colonies that exhibit one of the most pervasive, to me, AHB traits -- that being excitability (commonly referred to as "runny"). These "runny" bees seem to be very vigorous workers, maintaining their colonies very successfully. However, they make it more difficult to avoid accidental stings, but don't seem to be any more aggressive than typical, docile EHB colonies.

    I am now working to reduce the runniness, carefully, since it appears to be associated with increased vigor, which I appreciate. Working runny hives is best accomplished with a good pre-plan and expedient manipulations. Since this is counter to my own objectives, to spend extended time in almost every hive as I examine them, I appreciate the positives of runniness, but don't appreciate the negatives (difficulty with extended manipulation times).
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Washington County, Maine
    Posts
    2,963

    Default Re: Africanized bees

    It is interesting that some Africanized genetic markers are found in stocks of bees sold to the general public (BeeWeaver). My conclusion is that unmanaged stocks of African-European crosses are bad news, but that careful breeding (and who defines what careful is?) may help us win the fight against varroa.

    Now if what you are talking about is working unmanaged African European hybrids then I suggest you pay attention to people like Joseph Clemens who has to live with them (or at least be on guard against them)
    Master Beekeeper (EAS) and Master Gardener (U Maine CE) www.beeberrywoods.com

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