Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Palmdale, CA
    Posts
    65

    Default Raising Queens in the Southwest US

    I have a couple questions. Can queens be raised in the southwest US successfully? Or do people not do that much since there are so many AHB's? Is there a way to keep the AHB stock out of your queens?

    I am raising some queens now to see how it works, but I imagine that the queen will find a AHB drone. I know that Glenn Apiaries managed to do it, while being in southern California.

    One other question. Does it make a difference if I am at a higher elevation where the winters are much colder than LA? i.e. where it get into the 20'-30's at night and snows occasionally? I suspect that AHB's don't like the cold as much.

    Thanks for any help/insights.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Solano, California, USA
    Posts
    1,302

    Default Re: Raising Queens in the Southwest US

    Quote Originally Posted by Hilltop View Post
    I have a couple questions. Can queens be raised in the southwest US successfully? Or do people not do that much since there are so many AHB's? Is there a way to keep the AHB stock out of your queens?

    I am raising some queens now to see how it works, but I imagine that the queen will find a AHB drone. I know that Glenn Apiaries managed to do it, while being in southern California.

    One other question. Does it make a difference if I am at a higher elevation where the winters are much colder than LA? i.e. where it get into the 20'-30's at night and snows occasionally? I suspect that AHB's don't like the cold as much.

    Thanks for any help/insights.

    1. Glenn's transitioned to all AI after the wild bees showed up. Learning to AI would help you but its surely not the first thing I would put on any list that you will need in queen raising.

    2. Your location will put you behind the April demand curve for queens. To cold.. to late. least for early April queens.

    3. What prodigious pollen source do you have that would facilitate your ability to raise queens?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Palmdale, CA
    Posts
    65

    Default Re: Raising Queens in the Southwest US

    I was wondering if that was how Glenn's did it. That's good to know. I'm only looking to raise a few queens for myself and maybe a few others - not anything big. Some years it is quite warm here in April (like this year), but some years it is cold. There are a lot of wildflowers near me and the bees seem to find a lot of pollen early in the year.

    Do all those rearing queens in AHB zones use AI? Or do they just not raise queens? I assume that AHB will be everywhere in the US eventually. Does that mean that everyone will one day use only AI?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Otero County, New Mexico, USA
    Posts
    1,383

    Default Re: Raising Queens in the Southwest US

    Most of us where I am raise queens, at least for our own use. I could never sell them as my season for raising them is too short. I am 8000' up and it is pretty cold, but I also run hives in the desert at 3000'.

    Just breed for good traits. Don't breed from runny or mean bees. African genes are pretty inescapable in most areas for many reasons, not just the Brazilian influence. Where the bees come from is not as big an issue as the traits you propagate.

    I don't like to import bees from out of state - and on the same token, I don't like shipping our bees to other places. We need locally adapted varieties. We won't get that unless we breed from what we have on hand. My queens are bred mostly from bees that I have gotten from high elevation. Not because African genetics doesn't survive the cold, because it most assuredly DOES survive cold, but because for whatever reason they do not like the wet you find above the pines in the mountains and are quite rare up there. I don't usually breed from any bees I get from the desert flats. They are usually too runny and or mean. the mean is actually pretty rare around here, but you do see them, they are mostly runny and a little un-predictable - sort of like a longhorn from the old west days.

    When raising queens amongst the local stock, usually the bad traits show up after the 2nd generation, if they are going to.
    NM desert/mountain beekeeper - Black Mesa Honeybees.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads