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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Quincy, Illinois, USA
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    278

    Default Re: Missouri Bees from a Walnut Tree, turned into log hive

    Wow! That is very cool. I understand the process of removing the comb, rubber banding it into frames and all. The collection of the bees them selves and getting them into a box, do you use a vacuum? I do plan on building one this winter.
    Last edited by honeyman46408; 09-09-2013 at 05:07 PM. Reason: UNQuote

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Imperial, MO, USA
    Posts
    166

    Default Re: Missouri Bees from a Walnut Tree, turned into log hive

    I move a great deal of them as they're clinging to the comb, a lot more will move into the hive body if I find and cage the queen, and yes I do use a bee vac.
    Last edited by honeyman46408; 09-09-2013 at 05:04 PM. Reason: UNQuote
    "Teach your kids to hunt and fish, and you won't have to hunt for your kids"
    Four Ridge Apiaries www.fourridgebees.com

  3. #23
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Rockford, MI
    Posts
    2,605

    Default Re: Missouri Bees from a Walnut Tree, turned into log hive

    It is my guess that if you build them a good watertight roof they will be fine until spring. Goldenrod should be blooming and is the last real good nectar flow for the bees.
    If I had a hive like that, the Hogan trap out would be a permanent addition to the log hive!

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Park City Ky
    Posts
    1,842

    Default Re: Missouri Bees from a Walnut Tree, turned into log hive

    Quote Originally Posted by BeePappy View Post
    Thanks for that. We had thought of trying to catch a swarm from it in the spring.
    Rather than try to catch a swarm from it, trap starts from it. If they survive the Winter they are obviously survivors, good stock, and you could take 3 to 4 starts from it each year from now on. Great way to increase your hive count with survivor stock. If you haven't done a trapout, e-mail me at cchoganjr@scrtc.com and I will send you the instructions for a trapout for taking starts.

    Cut outs work great also, but, if you cut them out, then it is a one hive, possible two, solution. If you can leave the tree in its current position, I would trap starts.

    Good Luck.

    cchoganjr

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Quincy, Illinois, USA
    Posts
    278

    Default Re: Missouri Bees from a Walnut Tree, turned into log hive

    Update to this log hive. I added in a roof to protect the log hive entrance from the weather (rain and snow). It also does shield them from a direct hit of the sun. We've had 9 straight days of 90 + temps here, so a lot of fanning going on. The roof seems to help. This hive has now been upright for nearly two weeks, and has been in our yard for 16 days. The bees are much more accustomed to us and are a lot less aggressive which is good.
    I only fed them a few times to get them charged up. The other local hived joined in the "open feeding" used Boardmans on a nearby ladder, and a frenzy ensued. Not always friendly. I opened up the feeder mount by removing the back piece so it is like a tunnel. The first feeding, several bees got trapped in the back and didn't make it.
    Anyway, here are some pics.






  6. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Greene, Missouri, USA
    Posts
    557

    Default Re: Missouri Bees from a Walnut Tree, turned into log hive

    Cool. Are you going to hive them different next spring?
    No one famous.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Quincy, Illinois, USA
    Posts
    278

    Default Re: Missouri Bees from a Walnut Tree, turned into log hive

    Quote Originally Posted by Bee Whisperer View Post
    Cool. Are you going to hive them different next spring?
    Yes BW, the plan is to do trap starts from this log if they overwinter well. Mr. Hogan provided some good direction on how to accomplish this. It does make sense to be able to get at least a few starts off this one colony, and keep the log in tact for awhile. His link is in one of the above posts to this thread. We have another log hive that we could do the same thing, although it already has a box on the top of it, and the bees are slowly moving in.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    East Peoria, IL
    Posts
    398

    Default Re: Missouri Bees from a Walnut Tree, turned into log hive

    Every bee tree that I tried to "rescue" after falling had the comb collapsed and was pretty much a total loss. I've decided I'm not going to mess with fallen bee trees unless there is a $350+ check after everything is cleaned up. They've all (4) been a mess inside but I do have one sitting in my bee yard that does seem to be thriving. One we did yesterday as an impromptu bee club demonstration had absconded and we realized after starting to do some cutting that there weren't nearly enough bees anymore. The robbed out and chewed up comb when we got to the top of the hive was a testament to that. FORTUNATELY, the sun was shining just right and I was watching the bees as they flew away landed on the swarm 25' up in a nearby white pine. One of our helpers works for the power company and the shop was a mile away and got is a 35' telescoping hot stick with a bucket taped to it to catch the swarm. Second was a 36" oak tree (at the base) that was dead and felled for firewood. The colony was 30' up and all the comb was smashed to pieces from the impact. We had a Stihl 039 with 24" bar that was just barely enough to cut the **** thing open. A lot of work yesterday with nothing really of value.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Quincy, Illinois, USA
    Posts
    278

    Default Re: Missouri Bees from a Walnut Tree, turned into log hive

    Quote Originally Posted by DLMKA View Post
    Every bee tree that I tried to "rescue" ... lot of work yesterday with nothing really of value.
    Sorry to hear that DLMKA. I wondered about 'dropping' sections of tree from high up how much damage would be done. I have one in line for next spring that is 30' up, in a 16" dia. section. It's several years old, the owner has seen many swarms come from this colony. My thought was to take off the top of the branch section, then put rope around it which goes down to a truck or tractor, cut the hive section lose, let it drop and swing and then lower it to the ground. This one won't weigh near as much as that Walnut.
    The Walnut did fall, but perhaps only a few feet, and the top section of tree would have cushioned it somewhat. The tree trunk was off the ground until I cut it lose, and dropped it about 1'. I'm sure the comb was disrupted. They did rob out a hive when I got them here to home, but seemed to take only what they needed if that's possible. I fed them hard for a few days thinking they could re-build inside. Now they would appear to be acting like a 'normal' log hive. I see them bringing in pollen, and their numbers are better than my two Lang hives.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    East Peoria, IL
    Posts
    398

    Default Re: Missouri Bees from a Walnut Tree, turned into log hive

    If it's lowered down (and I see it lowered) I don't mind doing it but trees cut down or fallen in storms I'm not messing with them anymore without getting paid. Not worth an entire Saturday on the business end of a chainsaw.

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Park City Ky
    Posts
    1,842

    Default Re: Missouri Bees from a Walnut Tree, turned into log hive

    If you have some one operating the chain saw who will cut a little at a time, and let the tree fall slowly, I have found that you can save the bees, most of the time. (Not always, some trees fall so violently that the comb is destroyed and the bees abscond).

    For years, I got calls from a local logger who wanted the log that wasn't hollow, but, wanted me to remove the bees, and he was very good at falling the trees, then I would cut above where I thought the hollow ended, and he would then get a log or two above the bees. He would then take the dozer and load the log for me. I would take the log to the bee yard and set it back up like it was, using the loader on the tractor. I would then trap bees from the logs until they died out. (they normally die out because I took the queen, and the log did not make a new one). I have several hollow logs laying around the yard. I have never had a swarm go back into one of the vacant logs. So, apparently, they are not good swarm boxes.

    If you think the comb is mangled or destroyed, then split the log in halves, remove the bees, save any good brood, attach to frames, remove all honey and tree residue from the area, leave the box overnight, next morning move the bees to your yard.

    Most often, you will lose a lot of bees that are drenched in honey, no way to survive. But, you can normally get enough bees to make a good hive.

    cchoganjr

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Quincy, Illinois, USA
    Posts
    278

    Default Re: Missouri Bees from a Walnut Tree, turned into log hive

    Quote Originally Posted by Cleo C. Hogan Jr View Post
    I would then trap bees from the logs until they died out. (they normally die out because I took the queen ...
    cchoganjr
    What would determine whether or not the remaining colony makes a new queen if you take the queen in a trap start?
    Time of year, strength of remaining colony, amount of stores - all of above?

    Just guessing,
    Thanks.

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Park City Ky
    Posts
    1,842

    Default Re: Missouri Bees from a Walnut Tree, turned into log hive

    BeePappy.... Absolutely essential in making a queen is a viable egg, or multiple viable eggs in the feral source. (tree, log)

    Also whether the (or multiple) virgin queens successfully return to the feral colony after mating, I.E. did not get lost, or get eaten by a bird etc.

    Also dependent on how quick the feral colony realizes they are queenless. If the queen has been in your box for four or five days, laying eggs, then you remove the box (or frames), with the queen, all the eggs in the feral source, (tree, log), may no longer be viable to make a queen.This is probably the most likely reason the tree, log, colony dies.

    In Spring there are normally a lot of open brood from which they can make a new queen. As Summer comes on, there are fewer and fewer. Also all of the above. (time of year, strength of colony, amount of stores)

    cchoganjr

  14. #34
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Blythewood, SC
    Posts
    123

    Default Re: Missouri Bees from a Walnut Tree, turned into log hive

    Enjoyed reading about this. Thanks for the photos as well.

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Lake county, Indiana 46408-4109
    Posts
    3,539

    Default Re: Missouri Bees from a Walnut Tree, turned into log hive

    Here is one I am doing now.
    Ed, KA9CTT profanity is IGNORANCE made audible
    you can`t fix stupid not even with duct tape

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Lake county, Indiana 46408-4109
    Posts
    3,539

    Default Re: Missouri Bees from a Walnut Tree, turned into log hive

    2 more
    Ed, KA9CTT profanity is IGNORANCE made audible
    you can`t fix stupid not even with duct tape

  17. #37
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Quincy, Illinois, USA
    Posts
    278

    Default Re: Missouri Bees from a Walnut Tree, turned into log hive

    Honeyman,
    These are both "trap starts" in process?
    How's it going so far?

  18. #38
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Park City Ky
    Posts
    1,842

    Default Re: Missouri Bees from a Walnut Tree, turned into log hive

    honeyman46408

    Your bee yard looks a little like mine. Empty logs laying around, where bees have been moved into hives.

    cchoganjr

  19. #39
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    brooklyn, ny
    Posts
    109

    Default Re: Missouri Bees from a Walnut Tree, turned into log hive

    I had a similar reduce after sandy. I put empty honey supers over the trunk and an upper and lower entrance, and out cover. I used polystyrene on the bottom. It worked well until the rats chewed through the foam. Since you have wood on the bottom it should work well for you.

  20. #40
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Lake county, Indiana 46408-4109
    Posts
    3,539

    Default Re: Missouri Bees from a Walnut Tree, turned into log hive

    I used polystyrene on the bottom. It worked well until the rats chewed through the foam
    the bees will chew foam out too
    Ed, KA9CTT profanity is IGNORANCE made audible
    you can`t fix stupid not even with duct tape

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