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Thread: Wax Moths

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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Taylor County, Georgia, USA
    Posts
    713

    Default Wax Moths

    I just got done with the wax moth section in Langstroth's Hive and the Honeybee. He calls it the Bee Moth. He talks about the wax moth like modern beekeepers talk about SHB. Sometimes, he makes the problem sound nearly as serious as Varroa is today. Even to the extent of apiaries being decimated by it.

    So, here's my question: Have bees evolved since Langstroth's time to be better defenders against wax moths? Or am I just in an area where they are not a problem? Judging by this forum, wax moths seem to be a minor annoyance rather than the full blown crisis Langstroth talks about. I read much more on here about SHB than moths.

    Thoughts?
    Try it. What could happen?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Mtn. View, Arkansas, USA
    Posts
    1,245

    Default Re: Wax Moths

    The German bee in genereal use before the Italian was introduced to the US was a very poor housekeeper, and would have moth problems even in what then was considered to be a strong hive. The Italian on the other hand, was a very good housekeeper and would remove the eggs and larvae of the wax moths. Now wax moths destroy mostly drawn comb that is in storage and has not been treated to prevent moths and larvae from developing. Many of the treatments available now would not have been available to the beekeepers in Langstroth's day.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    1,347

    Default Re: Wax Moths

    i don't think shb and v mites had invaded yet.

    Moths like shb only plague weak hives where im at. I havn't lost a hive bc of either. But once the hive is weak they go in for the KO. I do notice a little moth activity in some hives early spring when the cluster is weak with alot of open comb and their sole focus is brood production. Warm weather SHB have lower populations up north, harsh winters knock them down. Sorta the same with v mites, lack of brood production probably has more influence though.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Lakeland, Florida
    Posts
    256

    Default Re: Wax Moths

    I've been helping in an apiary last couple months with 63 hives. I can tell you that I've seen a half dozen hives that were just chewed up and decimated by the wax moths. Their larva is like little maggots crawling and eating and I helped clean 2 hives out personally. just plain ole ugly nasty and if it'd been my hoves i would have bleached and cleaned before reusing. I know this is central Florida and we have just about everything but i'm wondering how to spray or prevent the moths. Any solutions out there??? I'd hate for those things to grab a good foothold in my garden!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    1,347

    Default Re: Wax Moths

    Quote Originally Posted by Santa Caras View Post
    i'm wondering how to spray or prevent the moths. Any solutions out there??? I'd hate for those things to grab a good foothold in my garden!
    Im sure theres something out there, I don't like spraying my bees so wouldn't know treatments/chemicals. Wax moths don't like paradichlorobenzene.

    Keep your hives strong & remove unused comb is the best prevention!! And similar to shb remove hiding spots like sloted top and bottom bar frames.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Topeka, Kansas, USA
    Posts
    73

    Default Re: Wax Moths

    Spraying combs with BT I purchased from forum member Sundance works for me to prevent wax moth damage to combs, and is considered organic.

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