Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 34 of 34
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Herrick, SD USA
    Posts
    4,551

    Default Re: Chances of queen dying on mating flights

    Large scale queen producers would, I am sure, agree that anything over a 90% success rate is pretty rarified air though at least some of the "misses" may well involve cells that never hatched. If you don't have a lot of nearby hives to distract a returning, disoriented queen, though, I would think its reasonable to expect at least 9 of 10 queens to successfully find their way back into the proper hive.
    "People will generally accept facts as truth only if the facts agree with what they already believe."- Andy Rooney

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Reno, NV
    Posts
    3,149

    Default Re: Chances of queen dying on mating flights

    Quote Originally Posted by heaflaw View Post
    So, she can be and often is mated with her own sons.
    Please explain exactly how it is that an unmated queen has produced a son to mate with. This is going to be interesting.

    I suspect that you mean brother.
    Stand for what you believe, even if you stand alone.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Mtn. View, Arkansas, USA
    Posts
    1,300

    Default Re: Chances of queen dying on mating flights

    Using instrumental insemination it is possible. A virgin queen can first be gassed with carbon dioxide which will induce her to start to lay, the eggs are drones and when the drones mature the semen is used to inseminate the virgin queen. At least that is how I have read it can be done.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    28,014

    Default Re: Chances of queen dying on mating flights

    Quote Originally Posted by marcos bees View Post
    I have a virgin queen that may be my only chance at a queen that will lay eggs. My other hive has no queen. Unfortunately, here we cannot order queens like in the U.S., so I have to make this queen work or I'm in deep crap and will likely lose both hives.

    What is the chance my queen will die on her mating flights? If she does then I'm up a creek.

    Also, does she mate with drones from her hive or other hives? I ask b/c there is no one in the local area who has meliferra, so I assume she would have to mate with drones from one of my hives. And there aren't that many drones. Like only a handful.
    All the other bees in your area, are they apis dorsata or apis cerana? Or both?
    Mark Berninghausen
    Squeak Creek Apiaries



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Lincolnton, NC
    Posts
    1,118

    Default Re: Chances of queen dying on mating flights

    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel Y View Post
    Please explain exactly how it is that an unmated queen has produced a son to mate with. This is going to be interesting.

    I suspect that you mean brother.
    Yes, I meant genetically related.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    28,014

    Default Re: Chances of queen dying on mating flights

    I thought that there was a theory that queens flew farther away from the hive to mate than drones flew to mate. If true, that would keep queens from mating w/ their brothers.

    I looked in my Encyclopedia of Beekeeping but couldn't find it stated. Other interesting stuff in there though. Drones don't start searching for the queen scent 9-0-2 until they get to a certain altitude, about 30 feet up. If I recall what i read correctly. How drone congregations are established and why they are established where they are is not fully understood.
    Mark Berninghausen
    Squeak Creek Apiaries



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Stockholm, NJ, USA
    Posts
    68

    Default Re: Chances of queen dying on mating flights

    Marco, isn't Indonesia a tropical country? I come from a tropical country myself and feral bees are abundant in tropical countries, a least where I am from. They even settle in peculiar high places, trees and masonry wall. Just ask the locals about bees in the area. It must be a good flow year around.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Indonesia
    Posts
    69

    Default Re: Chances of queen dying on mating flights

    Robert, yes indonesia is very tropical. Where are you from?

    There are wild bees here, but they are mostly apis cerana, the local native bee. Apis mellifera were imported back in the day and although they do well here, they are not native, so I am not sure if they can be considered "feral". Generally, what we find in the wild here are cerana.

    Quote Originally Posted by roberto487 View Post
    Marco, isn't Indonesia a tropical country? I come from a tropical country myself and feral bees are abundant in tropical countries, a least where I am from. They even settle in peculiar high places, trees and masonry wall. Just ask the locals about bees in the area. It must be a good flow year around.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Lincolnton, NC
    Posts
    1,118

    Default Re: Chances of queen dying on mating flights

    Marcos, let us know what you do and how it works out for you.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    28,014

    Default Re: Chances of queen dying on mating flights

    Quote Originally Posted by roberto487 View Post
    It must be a good flow year around.
    This is a false assumption that people often make. There is nowhere that one will find good flows all year around. Ecosystems and flowering plants don't work that way. In temperate climates, such as the Northern parts of the US, we have warm times when flowering plants can produce w/ dry periods when they don't followed by a cold time w/ snow. Tropical areas have rainy seasons.
    Mark Berninghausen
    Squeak Creek Apiaries



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Stockholm, NJ, USA
    Posts
    68

    Default Re: Chances of queen dying on mating flights

    Quote Originally Posted by marcos bees View Post
    Robert, yes indonesia is very tropical. Where are you from?

    There are wild bees here, but they are mostly apis cerana, the local native bee. Apis mellifera were imported back in the day and although they do well here, they are not native, so I am not sure if they can be considered "feral". Generally, what we find in the wild here are cerana.
    Marco, I am from the Dominican Republic, the Apis mellifera were also imported a while back and they have a strong hold on the ecosystem, they are basically everywhere. I have seen hives on colonial ruins in the capital city and in the country side they are abundant on avocado and mango trees.

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Indonesia
    Posts
    69

    Default Re: Chances of queen dying on mating flights

    Thanks Roberto. What kind of flowers do the bees feed on in the DR?

    Right now I see mango trees here starting to bud. Should be a few months til they are in bloom.

    Quote Originally Posted by roberto487 View Post
    Marco, I am from the Dominican Republic, the Apis mellifera were also imported a while back and they have a strong hold on the ecosystem, they are basically everywhere. I have seen hives on colonial ruins in the capital city and in the country side they are abundant on avocado and mango trees.

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Stockholm, NJ, USA
    Posts
    68

    Default Re: Chances of queen dying on mating flights

    avocado, mangoes, bananas, passion fruit, papaya, guava, squash, citrus, and so on.

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Indonesia
    Posts
    69

    Default Re: Chances of queen dying on mating flights

    Thanks Heaflaw, this is the info I was looking for. Yeah, I wanted to know how long the eggs or larva could last in transit while not being fed by nurse bees. Here the post office will not allow bees to be shipped.


    Quote Originally Posted by heaflaw View Post
    Since no one else is answering you, I'll try and then maybe someone north of the Mason-Dixon line can help also.

    It takes about 3 days for eggs to hatch into larva. For bees to raise a new queen, they need to use larva that has hatched less than 3 days and preferably only one day. So, if your shipment takes a long time to arrive, they cannot use the larva to raise successful queens.

    The larva need to be fed as soon as they hatch from eggs, so if eggs are shipped and at least some of them are newly laid, I guess that would work. The eggs/larva absolutely must be kept warm-I think around 85 degrees F.

    It would be far better to have the frame of eggs shipped along with the adhering nurse bees to keep them warm and attend to any larva that hatch. They would need to be shipped in a ventilated container (cage made of screen wire would be perfect) and would need feed of soft candy, fondue, etc. Too much jarring in shipment would not be good.

    Hope I didn't leave something out.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads