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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Menomonee Falls, Wis.
    Posts
    2,606

    Default Re: New to the beebiz

    Be also aware that you MUSt have dependable equipment. What happens when you breakdown and the bees start to overheat? Will you replace them? I spoke with a gentleman that had another way to skin the cat. He rented a tractor from a large rental agency, and when there was trouble INSISTED that they bring a replacement tractor immediately.

    Ian - I bet you know how to work on your trucks yourself. Otherwise it can be expensive. pulled two broken axles(the part with the bolt circle you see where a "hub cap" would go on a cop car) out of a Mack today. It took about 1- 1/2 hours to diagnose, remove, and prep for new parts. Having trucks towed to the dealer can get expensive.

    Crazy greasy Roland

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,744

    Default Re: New to the beebiz

    Quote Originally Posted by jim lyon View Post
    Bee hauls, though, for us are 1,000 to 1,700 mile one way hauls which may take most of a week for a turnaround depending on whether you get stranded waiting for a backhaul over the weekend. When fuel was under a dollar a gallon beekeepers with big rigs would often just hustle back empty to haul another load. Now with $4.00 fuel and more restrictive enforcement of trucking laws this has become a thing of the past.
    good point Jim
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,744

    Default Re: New to the beebiz

    Quote Originally Posted by Roland View Post

    Ian - I bet you know how to work on your trucks yourself. Otherwise it can be expensive. pulled two broken axles(the part with the bolt circle you see where a "hub cap" would go on a cop car) out of a Mack today. It took about 1- 1/2 hours to diagnose, remove, and prep for new parts. Having trucks towed to the dealer can get expensive.Crazy greasy Roland
    yup, I know all about that kind of stuff. It is basically what makes us farmers. When we are making money, we get others to do our work, when we are not making money, we do the work ourselves.
    our CAT 939 crawler tore apart its rear dif this winter. We pulled the machine apart, had the diff rebuilt and we put it back together. The work would of been $25000 done in a shop, we did it for the cost of parts, $7000. To get someone else in to do the work our crawler does every year would be in the hundreds of thousands of dollars,
    Like I say, its got to pencil out, and then you need someone on the machine to run it

    I wouldnt haul my own bees 1700 miles away either, but having someone else run my hives down the road would make me nervous
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    10

    Default Re: New to the beebiz

    If you really want to Haul Bees, take a look at this shindig organised by Bee Culture on October 5th

    http://blog.beeculture.com/index.php...to-go-program/

    MILES TO GO PROGRAM
    Keeping Them Alive, Getting Them There and Back

    A two day conference on every aspect of Migratory Beekeeping
    If you move bees for a living, are going to or are thinking about it, you will not find the information, demonstrations and discussions offered at this gathering at any meeting, anywhere, ever.

    I'm in the UK, but a good friend of mine is one of the speakers, it will be worth your while to go along.

    Regards

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