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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Fayetteville, WV
    Posts
    57

    Default Mann Lake foundation

    This was the first year I have ever ordered from them, and had more problems than expected with the foundation. I like plastic foundation in wooden frames. I know what most are going to say the bees don't like it, but all my hives are using plastic foundation and I never had a problem with foundation from Brushy Mountain or Walter Kelley. So I figured they went light on the wax so I melted some down and brushed a new layer on the foundation and they took off great. But the thing that really got me wondering was I also ordered thin foundation for comb honey and the bees wouldn't touch it either. Anybody else had trouble with ML's wax?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Ankeny, Iowa, USA
    Posts
    574

    Default Re: Mann Lake foundation

    No problems here. Mann Lake Ritecell is the only thing I use.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Cookeville, TN, USA
    Posts
    3,910

    Default Re: Mann Lake foundation

    Same here - I wish I could trade all of my non-rite cell frames off. I think my bees just drew less comb period this year for some reason. Maybe because losses last year left me with enough comb that they just didn't need to. Could that be what happened to you?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Knox, Pa. USA
    Posts
    1,244

    Default Re: Mann Lake foundation

    I have never had a problem with Mann Lake frames.

    David I experienced the same thing. all my bees seem to be rather lax about drawing comb this year. the honey production seems down a bit too. which I find strange because we have had a steady bloom since April..

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Park City Ky
    Posts
    1,740

    Default Re: Mann Lake foundation

    Whether or not they draw comb, is often more a factor of need for additional storage, and a good honey flow. If foundation is given to the bees at the end of a good flow, or during a period where there is reduced nectar, the bees may ignore the foundation, and instead, fill the area above the brood, and the two outside frames of the hive. It may very well have nothing to do with the foundation itself.

    Sometimes a good way to get them started drawing comb is to give them one or two frames of drawn comb. Quite often this will start them moving up into the honey supers. (Unless the colony is strong, I would not give them all drawn combs, because drawn combs are harder to defend and protect than foundation.)

    cchoganjr

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Clackamas Oregon
    Posts
    695

    Default Re: Mann Lake foundation

    I have had great luck with deeps this year but poor luck with shallows. I plan on putting a frame or two of drawn in each super for next year because they did seem to go to town when they moved up. I also had some thin foundation in the shallows that I was going to use for cut comb and ended up with none.
    “Why do we fall, sir? So that we might learn to pick ourselves up” Alfred Pennyworth Batman Begins (2005)

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Camas, WA
    Posts
    1,918

    Default Re: Mann Lake foundation

    When did you put your cut comb supers on? My cut comb supers in Camas and those is Elmira, OR turned out great.
    Bruce

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Clackamas Oregon
    Posts
    695

    Default Re: Mann Lake foundation

    I had a LOT of swarming problems this year. From memory all 3 of my full size hives swarmed. I moved my two strong hives to the top of an apple orchard in Corbett (probably could see them from your house) and got a swarm that would not hardly fit in a deep. It built out 9 frames of deep foundation in a week. My checkerboard experiment did the same and it filled out a deep in 3 weeks. I built 11 deeps, 100 frames and wax used them all and had to make another order. I also built 8 shallows for cut comb (50 frames) , and 50 medium frames to existing equipment. Ended up with less than a shallow and a medium of honey and drawn comb. At the moment I am at 7 double deeps, my checkerboard (deep with 2 shallows), 3 singles, 2 queen castles, and a nuc. I am going to have to drive over there to Camas and learn from a master! I could visit you at lunch time.
    “Why do we fall, sir? So that we might learn to pick ourselves up” Alfred Pennyworth Batman Begins (2005)

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Camas, WA
    Posts
    1,918

    Default Re: Mann Lake foundation

    Quote Originally Posted by minz View Post
    I had a LOT of swarming problems this year.
    Well you need strong hives to make nice looking comb honey and swarming won't help that. I use shallows for cut comb. Making it (look nice) is harder than I originally thought it would be. You can't put the super on too early or they will chew holes in the foundation and too late and they won't fill out the frames. I put it on as the second super on a strong hive when they have the first (started on drawn comb) is almost full. I put the comb supers on the hives that are farthest along on filling their first supers. And I put them on when blackberries are opening.
    Bruce

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Fayetteville, WV
    Posts
    57

    Default Re: Mann Lake foundation

    Nectar flow, etc wasn't a factor, as soon as I replaced the uncoated foundation with foundation that I recoated the bees took off with it. These included everything from honey suppers to deeps. And the deeps were in small double frame splits as well as a booming cutout colony.

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