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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Escanaba,Mi, USA
    Posts
    20

    Default Emptly Honey Super?

    So, this is our first year with a hive, we started with empty undrawn frames in the brood boxes, and now we have drawn frames in nearly all of our frames in the two brood boxes. Our hive has been requeened by the bees themselves. But, the honey super has been on for about 3 weeks, and there is no drawn comb on any of the frames. I took out the queen excluder two weeks ago in case the bees were having problems with that. Is this normal? Do we have enough time left in the year for the honey super to be drawn out and get some honey in it?

    Thanks
    Bill

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Denver, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    13

    Default Re: Emptly Honey Super?

    Bill, a lot of what happens depends on a lot of things. Your hive may have been struggling to get going which prompted a supersedure. Which in turn probably cost you several weeks with your new queen getting going. I think I would be happy that your hive has done as well as they have under those circumstances. If it were me I would leave the super on if your deeps are full of brood and honey stores. If not I would take it off and let them grow. You might prepare yourself to feed them in the fall so they can winter without stress. Good luck

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Escanaba,Mi, USA
    Posts
    20

    Default Re: Emptly Honey Super?

    yea, the two brood boxes are full of honey and now brood again. I will leave the super on then and see what happens. Thanks for your reply.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    1,347

    Default Re: Emptly Honey Super?

    You're pretty far north and your season will be over before you know it. I would ask around locally about normal wintering weight, if fall flowers like goldenrod are blooming and plan accordingly. The super will most likely remain empty.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Slinger, WI
    Posts
    204

    Default Re: Emptly Honey Super?

    the bee's won't draw out the new foundation until they feel they need the space. When the brood boxes are full to their liking they will work on your honey super. I would leave the excluder in place, keep your queen in the bottom two, as for pulling the honey super I would say End of August to mid September. This gives them ample time to fill the extra space in the brood boxes created when the queen starts slowing down in preparation for winter. As for feeding, I prefer to put candy boards on, but I wait until February or March to do that, if you give them time your boxes should be around 75-80lbs each. That is what I shoot for in fall with my bees and I have a good success rate for getting my bees through winter.
    Steve Wenger
    Gentleman farmer/7 year Bee Keeper

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Ludington, Michigan
    Posts
    612

    Default Re: Emptly Honey Super?

    I keep supers on until I start to see alot of goldenrod which is still a ways off. This is star thisle season and the bee's can suprise you. A couple of years ago I helped a friend with the same problem. He was doing crush and strain with shallows and starter strips. His colonies were in the 2nd season with good populations. We took his supers and put them between the deep brood boxes for just a couple of days then back to the top. They build alot of comb in those 2 days.
    Last edited by danno; 08-01-2013 at 10:36 AM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Posts
    1,194

    Default Re: Emptly Honey Super?

    Quote Originally Posted by chevydmax04 View Post
    the bee's won't draw out the new foundation until they feel they need the space. When the brood boxes are full to their liking they will work on your honey super. I would leave the excluder in place, keep your queen in the bottom two, as for pulling the honey super I would say End of August to mid September. This gives them ample time to fill the extra space in the brood boxes created when the queen starts slowing down in preparation for winter. As for feeding, I prefer to put candy boards on, but I wait until February or March to do that, if you give them time your boxes should be around 75-80lbs each. That is what I shoot for in fall with my bees and I have a good success rate for getting my bees through winter.
    Does one simply guess the weight of a box or hive or do folks actually weigh them. If so what is the best way to do this....just a regular bathroom scale.

    I am older and am finding it very hard to lift even dadant size boxes when full. One hive now has 2 brood deeps and 5 dadant honey supers. I add the new honey supers between the topmost brood deep and the previous honey super so I need to shift a lot of boxes...which are now high up. Do some simply remove the full honey supers before adding another. If so is there any problem storing them. For winter I had planned on giving all hives a few frames of the honey as not all the hives have produced as much honey.

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