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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Chelan, Washington, USA
    Posts
    1

    Default Coloring Beeswax Candles

    One thing I've been wanting to do but would like some advice on is when
    making beeswax Candles, how do I dye them different colors?

    Specifically, Can I just use any old dye, or can I possibly ruin the Candle
    if I don't use a specific process or type of dye? I just want to be able
    to make like say Red candles for holiday, that sort of thing.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    2,436

    Default Re: Coloring Beeswax Candles

    Quote Originally Posted by Kfollower View Post
    One thing I've been wanting to do but would like some advice on is when
    making beeswax Candles, how do I dye them different colors?

    Specifically, Can I just use any old dye, or can I possibly ruin the Candle
    if I don't use a specific process or type of dye? I just want to be able
    to make like say Red candles for holiday, that sort of thing.
    I use my own blood!! Adds to the earthiness of the beeswax.

    jk no idea.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Grosse Ile, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    2,972

    Default Re: Coloring Beeswax Candles

    They make color chips to add to the liquid wax.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Outagamie County, Wisconsin USA
    Posts
    1,187

    Default Re: Coloring Beeswax Candles

    Mann Lake, Betterbee and some others sell beekeeping supplies and candle supplies. They are also online.

    You can use the color chips for candles or even use the candle honeycomb texture sheets to tint your wax. If you dip your candles, you can just make the last two dips in colored beeswax.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Chester County, Pennsylvania, USA
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: Coloring Beeswax Candles

    Do you color beeswax for the last two dips? Or do you color a different type of wax for the colored portion? I've read that it can be difficult to color pure beeswax.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    51,071

    Default Re: Coloring Beeswax Candles

    I always thought the color was one of the nicest things about a beeswax candle, and it's what identifies it as such. If I see a red candle, I assume it is paraffin...
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 42y 40h 39yTF

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Outagamie County, Wisconsin USA
    Posts
    1,187

    Default Re: Coloring Beeswax Candles

    There are color chips that can be used to color beeswax. Most candle supplies I buy are from either Mann Lake or Betterbee. I have also used (gasp) the honeycomb sheets that they sell in various colors to color beeswax. Keep in mind that the color you add will be affected by the natural color of the beeswax. Think blue and yellow yields greenish unless you use enough blue color. Also, melted wax is quite a different color from what it ends up like when solid.

    While I have dipped natural (uncolored) beeswax into colored beeswax for the final two dips, I don't like the candles as much. They are not as crisp. It was more work, too. Now I just color all the wax I will be using for that candle.

    I never add fragrance or essential oils to my beeswax candles, preferring the natural sweet scent of beeswax. Scents like those from E.O. or synthetic are not meant to be burned. I will also never add any paraffin wax to my candles. For special occasions, I will add bayberry wax (from the plant) to beeswax.

    Anyone that sells colored beeswax candles will identify them as such as beeswax is a selling point. The natural candles seem to glow throughout the top portion of the candle. The tinted candles don't seem to do that. I do get bloom on all my BW candles - natural or tinted.

    Look for that bright glowing ball in the flame area of a beeswax candle. Very cool!

    All said and done, I prefer the natural beeswax colors ranging from almost ivory to yellow to golden. People buying candles like color options in addition to the natural look.
    *

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