Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    5,031

    Default For bees and butterflies

    Just before Spring, I rounded up various milkweed seed, to try in my bee garden plantings.

    I knew they were also host plants for Monarch butterflies, but was not aware that their was a related species that also used the milkweed for a host, the Queen butterfly. They appear to be the first to colonize my milkweed garden as host plants (food for their larvae).



    There are pesky yellow aphids bothering many of the milkweeds (you can see them in the background of the photo - above), does anyone know how to reduce them greatly, without harming the caterpillars, butterflies, or bees?

    There are already many lacewings pursuing these aphids, as well as many additional clusters of lacewing eggs.
    Last edited by Joseph Clemens; 07-26-2013 at 09:28 AM.
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Knox, Pa. USA
    Posts
    884

    Default Re: For bees and butterflies

    lady bugs eat aphids

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Sacramento, Calif. USA
    Posts
    267

    Default Re: For bees and butterflies

    lady bugs eat monarch and queen eggs and young caterpillars.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    5,031

    Default Re: For bees and butterflies

    Well, the aphid problem almost sorted its own self out. Soon after my starting this thread, lacewings laid many groups of eggs on these plants, the eggs hatched and aphids began to disappear, then hoverfly larvae arrived, then beetles that somewhat resembled lady bugs (though, not lady bug beetles). Now, there are very few aphids, though every few weeks there are dozens of Queen butterfly larvae feeding on most of the various milkweed host plants, including the (Calotropis procera) milkweed tree.

    I was surprised they spontaneously chose this for one of their host plants. It can grow to the size of a small tree, though mine are still only three feet or less in height. Its leaves resemble those of a Magnolia tree, which is why I'm surprised the butterflies chose it to lay any eggs on.
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads